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  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 20:10
    3D Printing Tips: PrettySmallThings – “Up and Running with 3D Printing” Tutorial Series #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Watch_the_Online_Video_Course_Up_and_Running_with_3D_Printing

    Kacie Hultgren, aka “PrettySmallThings” — one of my favorite designers from Thingiverse! — created a great getting started series for desktop 3D printer hobbyists: “Up and Running with 3D Printing” @ Lynda.com:

    There’s never been a better time to try 3D printing. This course draws a roadmap for getting started with 3D printing (aka additive manufacturing), from choosing a printer to learning about 3D modeling. After surveying a variety of commercial 3D printing technologies (filament-based, laser sintering, and more), author Kacie Hultgren walks you step-by-step through a variety of 3D design tools, including 3D modeling and 3D scanning. You’ll also learn how to repair designs so they’re ready to print, with netfabb Studio, a 3D printing suite. This is a great course for both 3D printing novices as well as designers with existing modeling skills that want to enter the 3D printing marketplace.

    Topics include:

    • What is 3D printing?
    • What can you make with a 3D printer?
    • Understanding the different 3D printing technologies
    • Designing with 3D modeling and scanning
    • Creating watertight 3D designs
    • Repairing a 3D file
    • Exporting your file

    Read More. Note, the embed below might not behave in your browser — visit Lynda.com for the free welcome video!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 19:00
    What Would Don Draper Make With a 3-D Printer? #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    shark

    Here are a bunch of the user-suggested ideas made into sculptural form for the Suntory 3D-Printing + Whiskey ice projects:

    From Wired:

    “There are 3-D things, 3-D printers, and 3-D projection everywhere but none of it seems really useful,” says TBWA Executive Creative Director Kazoo Sato. “We wanted to create something meaningful.”

    Each sculpture started as a block of ice nearly six inches wide and was painstakingly carved over a period of hours using a CNC router inside a 19 °F freezer/studio. A thick bit roughed out the form, a thin tip went for a second pass to bring out the details, and the cube was flipped so the process could be repeated. Each cube took between one and six hours of milling and some of the more complex designs, like the legs of the horse, required several blocks of ice to be milled and combined.

    The subjects of the sculptures were suggested by fans of Suntory Whisky who sent the company descriptions of pivotal moments in their lives where liquor played a prominent role. A professor likened the courage gained from a drink to the inspiring words of Abraham Lincoln. Sadness over unrealized childhood dreams of space travel were softened by three fingers and an icy astronaut. An imbiber shared a poetic vision of Kinkaku-ji, the golden Buddhist temple, and how a miniature version would transform brown liquor into a golden beverage as it melted. “We tried to pick simple to complexed shaped ideas, ones that had dreams and hope, ones with stories that emotionally moved us,” says Sato….

    Read More.

    Nike

    Pasted Image 4 24 14 12 51 PM

    Pasted Image 4 24 14 12 50 PM


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 18:00
    3D Printing Tips – Stress Testing Injected Hot Glue for Solid, Fast, Cheap 3D Prints #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Here’s a handy method for quickly creating strong parts using a combination of 3D printing and HMA injection — check out this tutorial by Hunter Nance at MAKE!

    Stress Testing Injected Hot Glue for Solid, Fast, Cheap 3D Prints.

    Printing a solid object (100% infill) has many advantages, namely strength and rigidity. However, it takes much longer to print with high infill and, of course, takes much more material.

    We at Lantern Robotics devised an interesting solution by injecting Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA) into hollow prints (0% infill). HMA, also referred to as hot glue, is a thermoplastic with a melting temperature around 180°C, which allows it to be injected into printed objects without causing them to distort or deform due to excessive heat.

    The result is a cheaper, faster printed object that is completely solid, and depending on your shell setting, can be rigid or flexible. Here’s how to try it.

    Pasted Image 4 24 14 11 27 AM

    Step 1: Print your object with 0% infill.  For our process 3-4 shells is ideal.

    Stress Testing Injected Hot Glue for Solid Fast Cheap 3D Prints MAKE

    Step 2: Drill two holes: one for injections, and one for venting. Make the hole a tight fit for the tip of your glue gun, this allows good back pressure and prevents leakage.

    Stress Testing Injected Hot Glue for Solid Fast Cheap 3D Prints MAKE

    Step 3: Inject HMA into the print until glue seeps out of the vent hole. Let cool.

    Tips:

    • This method is best for objects with central voids or large cavities.
    • Use a precision metal tip (as pictured). It provides much more control.
    • If injecting into PLA use the lowest temperature possible on your glue.
    • Isopropyl alcohol breaks HMA’s bond with whatever it is sticking to.
    • Keep this in mind for clean-up or if you drip some glue on the outside of the model.
    • For larger objects you can drill additional holes.
    • You can always add the holes into your design, which allows more precise placement.
    • If using outside or in a high heat environment, cover the holes with a bit of ABS+Acetone.

    The details above will get you started, but check out the full article for more details of testing and methods.

    Pasted Image 4 24 14 11 29 AM

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 17:00
    Nintendo Style Case for the Raspberry Pi #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    NinTastic-Red_and_Gray-1_display_large

    Thingiverse user tastic007 uploaded an awesome Raspberry Pi case that makes you say, “Why didn’t I think of that?”. Inspired by the classic Nintendo entertainment system, He designed a 3-piece design that snap fits together. The case was modeled in Tinkercad and holds the Raspberry Pi Model B. The two-color flap is a great example of using the pause-to-change-filament feature on the makerbot replicator. Tastic007 wrote up a detailed guide on the build. The raspberry pi cartridge sticker on the SD card is a great finishing touch. It’s only missing the two buttons for power and reset. An LED next to the power button would make a great remix for anyone daring enough to print this project.

    This case was designed specifically in creating a RetroPie gaming system, which combines a number of video game emulator technologies into a single Raspberry Pi based solution.

    Check out more photos of this retro project on Thingiverse .

    Download on Thingiverse

    NinTastic-Main_Components-1_display_large

    NinTastic-Whole-1_display_large


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 16:03
    Hydrogen Fuel Cell Developer Kit


    Homehobbydevkits2 1024X1024

    Hydrogen Fuel Cell Developer Kit – Open-Source Systems @ Arcola Energy.

    Introducing the new range of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Developer Kits from Arcola Energy and Horizon Fuel Cell Technologies. The perfect starting point if you want to create your own fuel cell power system. Suitable for academic, hobby and commercial product developers. Easily design and build fuel cell systems using Horizon fuel cells. Integration with the popular Arduino, mbed and Raspberry Pi development boards allows easy connection to a computer to monitor performance. 

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 16:00
    DrugPrinter: print any drug instantly #3DxMedicine #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Egg cake machine

    Check out this journal paper proposing a 3D-printer-style machine designed to print any drug instantly, at the chemical level, taking its inspiration from a Chinese egg-cake oven (above). DrugPrinter: print any drug instantly:

    In drug discovery, de novo potent leads need to be synthesized for bioassay experiments in a very short time. Here, a protocol using DrugPrinter to print out any compound in just one step is proposed. The de novo compound could be designed by cloud computing big data. The computing systems could then search the optimal synthesis condition for each bond–bond interaction from databases. The compound would then be fabricated by many tiny reactors in one step. This type of fast, precise, without byproduct, reagent-sparing, environmentally friendly, small-volume, large-variety, nanofabrication technique will totally subvert the current view on the manufactured object and lead to a huge revolution in pharmaceutical companies in the very near future….

    Read More.

    DrugPrinterProcess

    Drugprintingprocess

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 15:00
    DIY Video Glasses for Raspberry Pi #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    3D Printed Video Glasses for Raspberry Pi

    If you missed your chance to buy a Google Glass, try this project. You can hack this wearable video display to make your own glasses­mounted wearable computer, powered with a Raspberry Pi.

    Our 3D Printed design turns this display into a google glass like form factor. It easily clips to your prescription glasses, and can display any kind of device with Composite Video like a Raspberry Pi.

    NTSC/PAL Video Glasses

    A pair of these wearable video glasses sets you back about 100 bucks, and the 3d printed parts are a free download on thingiverse. I printed these out to fit my glasses, but with a little CAD hacking, it can be adjusted to attach to nearly anything so you can customize the design to match your style.

    DIY Video Glasses for Raspberry Pi

    Full Tutorial at The Adafruit Learning System

    Thingiverse Download on our Thingiverse Profile


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 15:00
    Dead Space Isaac Clarke Costume with LEDs


    dead space costume

    Patient and dedicated cosplayers often give up hours to the cause, and Steven K Smith Props spent 300 hours over about three months to make this Isaac Clarke from Dead Space costume. The armor is detailed both in construction and paint, and Smith had to apply several light layers of spray paint and washes. He also installed LEDs to make the face light up. He explained the process:

    Moving on to the face lights. Very thin plexi glass purchased from Hobby Lobby was cut to fit in between the plates. The back side of each piece was sanded to diffuse the glow of the LEDs. To light the plates I wired 24 5mm leds to 2 AA battery packs. Because I couldn’t find the correct color I had to first sand then hand paint each LED aqua to match Isaac’s signature glow. I cut 24 little brackets out of sheet metal to hold the LEDs in place and to make sure that they were pointing up at the plexi glass. A very small gap was left in the 2nd Plexi glass plate this is where I will be able to see out of the helmet.

    dead space LEDs

    Read more at Instructables.

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 14:23
    Flying Robot Rockstars (video) #drone #drones



    Flying Robot Rockstars (video)-

    KMel Robotics presents a team of flying robots that have taken up new instruments to play some fresh songs. The hexrotors create music in ways never seen before, like playing a custom single string guitar hooked up to an electric guitar amp. Drums are hit using a deconstructed piano action. And there are bells. Lots of bells.

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 14:00
    Korean Government to Invest Heavily in 3D Printing, Offering 3D Printers to Individuals and Small Businesses for Free #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    WohlersAssoc

    Korean Government to Invest Heavily in 3D Printing, Offering 3D Printers to Individuals and Small Businesses for Free . Via 3Ders.org.

    As reported at koreajoongangdaily:

    The government yesterday announced its plan to nurture the local 3-D printing industry and has will supply printers for small and midsize companies to use for free.

    For its project, the Industry Ministry will spend 2.4 billion won ($2.3 million) this year to set up centers with printers, most of which will be imported, that can be used by the companies, and it will teach employees how to operate them.

    Starting next year, the ministry will lend 3-D printers to individual businesspeople and small companies for free.

    The government hopes the printers will increase manufacturing efficiency and generate profits in the local electronics, auto and medical industries, as well as other consumer goods.

    The Industry Ministry and Science Ministry received approval for their plan at a science and technology committee meeting with other ministers and private sector experts….

    Read More.

    3DPrinting in Korea

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 13:09
    “Added some colour syncing lenses to complete the suit!” #adafruit #led #wearableelectronics #cyberpunk #arduino #snowcrash
  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 13:00
    Using Simplify3D to slice beautiful prints #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Simplify3D sliced Simple Box - Bottom

    Simplify3D sliced Simple Box

    Ashley Webster shared these lovely photos of his weekend project on the 3D Printing google+ community. His goal was to make a simple box and print it as interesting as possible. That lovely looking sheen on the bottom of the part is printed on the build plate. We tend to get similar results when printing in ABS on a heated build plate with kapton tape but Ashley is using PLA. Using a 1:10 pva solution, he painted on a layer to his build plate and let it dry.

    The real beautify lies on how the part was sliced and printed. Using Simplify3D, Ashley sliced the bottom half of the box using 4 processes (4 sets of different slice settings). All at 0.2mm layers.

    I used Simplify3D. The bottom half of the box uses 4 processes (4 sets of different slice settings). All at 0.2mm layers.

    0-1.2mm: Concentric infill, 0.6mm width

    1.2-1.6mm: two layers of rectilinear infill to close a small gap at the center of the concentric infill and make the bottom watertight.

    1.6-2mm: two layers same as first set

    2mm+: 0.45mm filament width and rectilinear infill, because concentric didn’t work so well on the thin wall.

    This is an amazing technique that lets you set different slice settings based on the layers of the object. It’s great to see awesome results coming out from different slicing apps and Simplify3D is one we will definitely check out! As Ashley noted in the photo comments, “the craft to 3D printing is in the slicing.” Big kudos to Ashley for making such a lovely looking print! It definitely shows how to make the 3d printing process look seamless to the design. That wooden grain texture also makes a great combo!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 12:00
    Students solve old problem with new ketchup cap #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Students solve old problem with new ketchup cap:

    High school seniors Tyler Richards and Jonathan Thompson have spent a lot of time thinking about ketchup.

    As students in the Project Lead the Way program at North Liberty High School, Richards and Thompson have researched and developed a bottle cap that prevents that first squirt of ketchup from being a watery mess.

    Read More.

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 11:00
    123D Design Tutorial – Construct Features #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Probably one of the best tutorials on how to use the construct features in Auto Desks 123D Design. It’s one of those speedy videos on youtube that doesn’t have a voice over, but uses annotations and is very self explanatory (and has some awesome drum’n'bass music in the background). In just four minutes youtube user 3D Kobo shows you quick examples of using Extrude, Sweep, Revolve, Loft features. Be sure to check out the video, and give it a like if you find it useful.

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 10:00
    New PancakeBot #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    New PancakeBot featuring an Adafruit Motorshield!

    The New Version of PancakeBot. To be shown at the Bay Area Maker Faire. May 17th and 18th. San Mateo Fairgrounds.

    visit pancakebot.com for more details.

    Read More.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    Motorshield

    Adafruit Motor/Stepper/Servo Shield for Arduino v2 Kit: The original Adafruit Motorshield kit is one of our most beloved kits, which is why we decided to make something even better. We have upgraded the shield kit to make the bestest, easiest way to drive DC and Stepper motors. This shield will make quick work of your next robotics project! (read more)

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 09:00
    3D Modeling Enclosures for DIY Projects #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    3D Printed Enclosure Parts

    Getting your DIY electronics projects off the bread board and into a neat little package is probably one of the best uses for 3d printing.

    Designing your own project box may seem a little daunting, but knowing the design process can help you get started.

    A good data sheet will include layout dimensions, but sometimes they don’t. Luckily, a good set of calipers can assist you in measuring the dimensions of an object. You’ll be happy to know our custom products here at Adafruit include schematics and layout dimensions.

    Mitutoyo Calipers for Measuring Things

    Autodesk’s 123D Design [for desktop] is a great piece of free software that has an easy to use UI. Don’t let the simple interface intimate you, it can be a pretty power modeling tool. To get a breakdown of navigating around an object and an overview on features and tools, check out the autodesk 123d design youtube playlist.

    Autodesk 123D Design - 3D Modeling  enclosures for DIY Projects

    Let’s start off by creating a simple box from the primitives menu. When you select the box icon and move the mouse cursor over the canvas grid, enter a value for length, width, and the height of your desired project enclosure.

    Autodesk 123D Design - Adding Fillet

    Add a fillet to the edges to round them out by highlighting each side of the object. Hover over the floating gearing icon and select the Fillet feature. Enter a value to make the edges all round and nice like.

    Autodesk 123D Design - Shelling Objects for 3D Printing

    Highlight the top face of the box and choose the Shell feature. Enter 1.5 in the input box to make our project box 1.5mm thick.

    123D Design - Duplicate Covers

    Create a 1mm thick box with the same dimensions of the first box and make two duplicates of the object. This will make up our cover or lid that will snap onto the project box. Move the second copy above the first one so they’re separated.

    123D Design - Shell Duplicate Cover

    Highlight the top and bottom faces of the copy and shell it out by 1.5 mm. By selecting the top and bottom faces, it creates a frame.

    123D Design - Subtract From New Duplicate

    Create a new copy of the cover and move it up exactly in place with the framed out cover. Use the combine feature to subtract the frame from the new duplicate making a 1.5mm thinner cover copy.

    123D Designer - Trimmed Cover Copy

    Select the top and bottom faces of the trimmer cover copy and create a new shell with a 1mm thickness.

    123D Design - Shell Subtracted Cover

    Move the shelled frame down towards the original cover where the two intersect.

    123D Design - Combine Frame to Cover

    Use the combine join feature to merge the frame with the cover.

    123D Design - Positioned Parts

    Position the cover next to the box and ensure they’re both equally level to the grid. When you export these out as an STL, you’ll need to set the reset position of each axis so it prints in the middle of your build platform.

    Pleasant3D Quickly Center Object

    You can use a free app like Pleasant3D to quickly make this modification. Open it up and select the Center Object button, save and thats it! You can now slice it in Makerware, Replicator G, Slicer or any other slicing app.

    And there you have it! Some basic steps to get your first 3D modeled DIY electronics project started. So the next time you’re thinking about packaging your cool project, why not try 3d pinting. Having the capability to design and make just about anything for your projects is the best reason to own a 3d printer.

    What kind of 3D printed projects would you make if you had a 3D printer? Let us know in the comments below.

    Thanks for reading! Until next time, learn, make, share, repeat.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 08:00
    GoonQuad, an Emotive Quadruped Robot #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    GoonQuad, an Emotive Quadruped Robot:

    This week my students from Computing in the Creative Arts had a public exhibit of their term projects. This project is close to my heart as I worked closely with this particular group of students who despite having very little technical background were deeply passionate about creating an interactive robot capable of expressing emotions and interacting with people.

    The students involved were

    I have submitted this project to the robots and arduino contests. If you like it, your vote is appreciated :)

    I present you “Goon Quad”. In this version, Goon Quad has 4 prerecorded states (“angry”,”party”,”confused”,”breathe”), triggered by the touch of a person in areas specified by the eyebrows and a tattoo that read “Mom”, painted with bare conductive and used as capacitive sensors.

    My students just finished editing their video! Cheer them up with some comments and likes on YouTube :)

    Read More.

    3D printed robot


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 07:00
    A $50 3D-Printed Prosthesis Compared to a $42,000 Myoelectric Prosthesis #maketheworld #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    A $50 3D-Printed Prosthesis Compared to a $42,000 Myoelectric Prosthesis:

    I recently had the opportunity to work with a great guy named Jose Delgado, Jr., a 53-year old who was born without most of his left hand. I made a 3D printed prosthetic hand for Jose and, after using it for a while, I asked him to give me some honest feedback about how it compares to his more expensive myoelectric prosthesis. This is obviously not an “apples to apples” comparison in terms of the devices, but the real value of a prosthesis comes from how useful it is on a day-to-day basis, and that is the focus of the comparison here.

    This 3D printed prosthesis is a completely mechanical design. There are a series of non-flexible cords running along the underside of each finger, connecting to a “tensioning block” on the top rear of the device (the “gauntlet”). The tension is caused by bending the wrist downward. With the wrist in its natural resting position, the fingers are extended, with a natural inward curve. When the wrist is bent 20-30 degrees downward, the non-flexible cords are pulled, causing the fingers and thumb to bend inwards. A second series of flexible cords run along the tops of the fingers, causing the fingers to return automatically when tension is released….

    Read More.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 07:00
    From the mail bag…


    Mailbag animated
    From the mail bag!

    (Keep in mind this is coming from a mechanical engineer who had to take “Introduction to Electronics” twice…)

    Have no idea where else to post this, but spent some time this weekend with various new components from Adafruit and elsewhere and as I worked my way through various documentation and product pages I realized how much effort and thought has gone into everything. For me, it’s great to have a place to go where nothing is too trivial.

    Thanks to the crew at Adafruit – Nice to have you guys out there doing what you do!

    -vschmidtgvl

  • Thursday, April 24, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 4/23/14 (video)




    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 4/23/14 (video).

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