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  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 19:00
    Use Raspberry Pi to Print From Your iPad or iPhone @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    NewImage

    Use Raspberry Pi to Print From Your iPad or iPhone. via snapdragon tech

    Today my parents asked me to help them set up printing via their iPads. They have a rather old HP Deskjet 5940 printer with a simple USB interface.

    First you need to install CUPS (common unix printing system) for printer access. In my case the required printer drivers were installed automatically (hplip). If you are using a different printer you might have to check which packages you need.

    After cups is installed (took about 20 min here), enable remote access to it by editing the file /etc/cups/cupsd.conf in 3 places. Add those lines in the relevant places:

    1 Listen *:631

    2 Order allow,deny

    3 Allow 10.0.0.*

    Order allow, deny

    5 Allow 10.0.0.*

    After editing the file and restarting cups with service cups restart you can login to your print server on http://raspberry-pi.local:631. Simply click Administration > Add Printer and follow the steps. If the correct driver package is installed, and the printer is turned on, it should show up on the top of the list.

    If your printer installed correctly, it show up in your list of nearby printers, as well as on your iPad and iPhone. It’s not necessary to produce a special avahi-script any more, as with older iOS versions.

    Read More

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 19:00
    NEW PRODUCT – UV/UVA 400nm Purple LED 5mm Clear Lens – 10 pack


    1793 single

    NEW PRODUCT – UV/UVA 400nm Purple LED 5mm Clear Lens – 10 pack: Need some really bright LEDs? We are big fans of these 5mm clear UV / Purple LEDs. These emit UV ‘blacklight’ in the UVA spectrum so they are great for projects with fluorescent materials referred to as UV/blacklight-reactive or ‘glow-in-the dark’. They are bright (350mcd) and have about a 20-degree LED beam. They go easily into a breadboard and come in a pack of ten so you can easily add that extra UV zing to your project.

    If you need some help using LEDs, please read our “Introduction to using LEDs” tutorial for any electronics project.

    In stock and shipping now!

    1793 group

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 18:00
    Control your RC car with Scratch over GPIO #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    NewImage

    We love this RC car Winkleink programmed using Scratch on a Raspberry Pi over GPIO. Great fun!

    At the beginning of 2013 I started a Code Club at my local primary school and the kids love making and playing the games. Due to the way the club is set up in the school there is expected to be a few classes after the official Code Club sessions are completed so I’ve been trying to come up with some ideas of things I could bring in to the class to show the kids that Scratch can do more than make a cat move around the screen.

    Then on my regular trawl of the web I found this fantastic code http://cymplecy.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/scratch-controlling-the-gpio-on... for controlling the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi using Scratch.

    With an old cheap remote control car in a drawer I had the makings of a fun project for me that (hopefully) will be of interest to the kids.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 17:16
    New Products 4/9/2014 (video)



    New Products 04/9/2014 (video)

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 17:00
    PA Consulting Raspberry Pi Competition #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    PA Raspberry Pi competition challenges young students via raspberrypi.org

    The PA Raspberry Pi competition challenges young people to use the Raspberry Pi to make the world a better place. Last year I helped judge the competition and was amazed by the creativity and innovation of the entries (the excellent AirPi was one of last year’s winners). This year’s event was held in the Science Museum, and I went along to judge the Year 4-6 and Year 7-11 categories, and to run some workshops along the way.

    The Sonic Pi workshops were fantastic—they almost ran themselves, with the students continually trying out new things in quest to make the best music or silliest sounds (the exploding farmyard was a particular favourite). I’ve said it before, but Sonic Pi is genius.

    In the afternoon I joined my fellow judges: Rory Cellan-Jones, the BBC’s technology correspondent, and Claire Sutcliffe, co-founder of Code Club. We spent 15 minutes talking to each of the seven teams. The winning projects had to have the potential to benefit the world in some way and we were also looking for things like innovation, creativity and originality. What really stood out was the energy of the teams—they all talked passionately and knowledgeably about their projects and how they had used the Raspberry Pi to solve real world problems.

    The year 4-6 category was won by St Mary’s CE Primary School with their recycling robot Pi ‘n’ Mighty. The robot scans packaging barcodes and then tells you if it can be recycled and which bin to put it in. The team was bursting with energy and falling over themselves to explain how they’d made it and what it did. I’d love to see a Pi ‘n’ Mighty in every school canteen, encouraging recycling and helping children learn about the topic. And it looks fantastic, exactly how a robot should look!

    Frome Community College won the year 7-11 category prize with their prodigious Plant Pi, a system to care for plants and monitor their environment. The team had covered every aspect including hardware and web monitoring, and they had even created an app. It really is a brilliantly designed and engineered solution that already has the makings of a commercial product. The project is open source and includes code, instructions, parts list and documentation.

    It was a great day and it was a real pleasure to speak to the finalists and to see young people doing remarkable and useful things with the Raspberry Pi. If I could bottle the innovation, enthusiasm, creativity and technical skills in that room then I would have a Phial of Awesome +10. (I would carry it around with me in a belt holster and open it for the occasional sniff when feeling uninspired.) Best of all, I know that we’ll be seeing some of these finalists again: skills like computational thinking stay with you for life and will serve these kids in whatever they do in the future.

    NewImage

    Read more

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 16:00
    20-year-olds build a device that converts voice input to Braille characters using @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    This innovative project is a device that converts what you say into Braille to help the visually impaired. See it in action around the 2 minute mark. Via YourStory.

    Give an engineer a tool and he will work wonders. This is what happened when Sanskriti Dawle and Aman Srivastav, second year students at BITS Goa, came across Raspberry Pi (a credit card sized computer) during a workshop.

    It didn’t excite them at first. “Typing code to make lights glow, what’s the big deal,” said Sanskriti. However, as Aman continued playing around with the device he saw a lot of possibilities. It was during a random conversation that they came up with the idea of a ‘Braille Dicta-Teacher’, a device to make learning Braille easier for the visually challenged…

    There are over 285 million visually challenged people in the world, and even in a developed country like the US less than 10 percent of the visually challenged people are literate. The scenario in India is much worse. To counter this, Sanskriti and Aman started Project Mudra. They have developed a device which converts voice input to Braille characters using Google’s speech API and hardware using Raspberry Pi.

    The device works in three different modes – Browse mode, Auto mode and Exam mode.

    Browse mode – In the browse mode, user speech input is converted into tactile Braille output. This enables users to speak out the words they want converted into Braille thus learning at their own pace and comfort.

    Auto Mode – The Auto mode runs a predetermined speech sequence and converts it into a tactile output. This is generally suited best for memorization and disciplined learning. It reads through all the English alphabets and numbers sequentially and the Braille output for each of them is generated synchronously along with the audio output.

    Exam Mode – Exam mode tests the user recall based on his ability to guess the correct letter in the Braille interface and gives the answer as speech output. Here a random letter is chosen in Braille script and the user is prompted by the speech input for the respective letter. Then the user’s input is checked against the database and the correct answer is revealed.

    “Learning ABC is the first step to literacy in any language,” says Sanskriti. And this is what they are trying to accomplish for the visually challenged…

    Read more.

    NewImage


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 15:00
    Setting Up Wireless Networking on Your Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi


    Muo raspi wireless dongle close

    This handy tutorial shows you how to set up wireless networking on your raspberry pi, from makeuseof.

    When you first acquire your Raspberry Pi, the best option is to use an Ethernet connection to ensure the operating system is correctly configured and up-to-date. You can then move onto a wireless USB connection once you’re happy.

    The benefit of Ethernet over wireless LAN on the Raspberry Pi – as with most other platforms – is that there is zero configuration required. All you need to do is ensure the cable is connected to a correctly-configured router, plug it into your Pi and boot it up.

    Conversely, setting up wireless LAN on the Raspberry Pi can be tricky. The first thing to do is make sure you have chosen a compatible wireless USB dongle.

    Finding A Compatible Wireless USB Dongle

    There are various way that you might have acquired your Raspberry Pi. You might, for example, have bought it as a standalone unit and purchased the required additional components, a tactic that can prove more expensive than expected but still cheaper than other computers.

    Alternatively, you may have purchased a Raspberry Pi kit, containing the computer, a case, SD card, and other hardware, including the wireless dongle. In this case, you should be confident that the dongle will be compatible with the computer.

    Many early buyers of the Raspberry Pi didn’t have the option of a dedicated Wi-Fi dongle, and had to rely on trial and error. This is how the list of compatible hardware was created at elinux.org, which includes a section on wireless USB dongles.

    For the best results, you should get your hands on the USB Wi-Fi adaptor distributed through The Pi Hut. This is a Wireless N device that will also work on other platforms (Windows, other Linux distros, Mac OS X) and is available for around $10 plus shipping.

    This is the most common Wi-Fi adaptor in use for the Raspberry Pi, and is the one used to outline the process of configuring your WLAN connection below. Note that the following steps are intended for Raspbian users – the general process should be largely the same on your chosen Raspberry Pi distro, however.

    Configuring The WLAN Connection

    Start by connecting your USB Wi-Fi adaptor to your Raspberry Pi, ensuring the Ethernet cable is also connected. Check your SD card is secure and connect to your power supply.

    You’ll need to ensure your version of Raspbian is fully updated, so after you log on, enter:

    sudo apt-get update

    Alternatively, you can launch into the GUI (enter startx)> and enter the same command in LXTerminal.

    Next, check that the USB dongle is detected by your minicomputer – enter lsusb and check the results. The Wi-Fi device should be listed

    Muo raspberrypi commands lusb

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 15:00
    Make Moving Dragon Wings



    Have about $20? Then you can make a set of dragon wings with this tutorial from gryphern. The movements are controlled by body posture, and the wings are very lightweight. Materials to make the wings include a PVC skeleton, trash bags or a shower curtain, and other everyday objects. Even though the wings are fashioned from simple supplies, they’re durable. The video goes over the process in detail and has a demonstration – and a link to a downloadable diagram. Here’s the beginning of the tutorial:

    So first, design your wing and choose what material you want for the membrane. I decided on fabric when I saw this shimmery stuff, so I bought it off the bolt at the JoAnn Fabric store.

    Spread out your membrane material, that’s what will limit the size and shape of your wing. Then, cut the high temp PVC pipe into two pieces to match your design, it’ll be the long, moving part of the wing. The reason I’m using high temp pipe is that it’s thin and springy, it’s no wider that a Euro cent (Props to my EU viewers, yo!) I cut it at an angle so it would look cooler. It can be cut with a hand saw or a cable saw (which is wire cable with handles.)

    Read more and get downloads at gryphern’s site.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 14:00
    Dial-A-Song Builds Voicemail Music Box into Old Phone #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    Dial A Song

    Adam Haile wrote in to share about his Dial-A-Song project — in order to create a matrix keypad Raspberry Pi interface he had to write a new library around interrupts instead of polling (here!) that he wanted to share. “I’m using an old phone keypad here but it works great with your membrane 3×4 keypad equally as well.”

    Here are a few details from his ongoing Dial-A-Song Voicemail Musicbox Project:

    Much of the inspiration came from They Might Be Giants, who used to leave recordings of their songs on their answering machine, which could be listened to by calling (718) 387-6962. So, I wanted to combine a little of that with a phone tree menu to give the feel of calling in to a phone service to listen to music of your choice. Yes, it’s a little ridiculous, but why else would I be building it.

    As a way of documenting the project and an extra push to keep working on it, I’m going to be writing up a build log in several parts as the build progresses.

    …The first thing to do was remove the short ribbon cable that came on the keypad and replace it with something a little longer so I could more easily hook it up to the Pi.

    …It’s super simple to use as you can see from the code below. Instantiate the class with a callback function and that function gets called when there’s a keypress on the pad. Just note that the callback will be running on the context of a different thread from the main thread. While it uses interrupts, RPi.GPIO cheats a little bit and the interrupts are actually running on background threads and so will the callback. Not usually a big problem but something to be aware of.

    You can grab the full library and find any updates to it on GitHub.

    Read More.

    Dial a song

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 13:00
    How to change the Raspberry Pi password #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    RaspberryPi Spy posted this useful video on how to change your Raspberry Pi password.

    The default Raspbian SD card image configures a default user account called ‘pi’ with a password of ‘raspberry’. Every device using this image will therefore have the same username and password combination. This is great for quickly getting starting but isn’t very good practice from a security point of view.

    You should therefore consider changing the default password as soon as possible. It’s easy to do and only takes a minute. Here are the simple steps you need to follow :

    1. From a command line prompt type passwd followed by the Enter key.
    2. Enter the current password followed by the Enter key.
    3. Enter the new password followed by the Enter key.
    4. Re-enter the new password followed by the Enter key.
    5. Your password has now been changed.

    Your screen will look something like the screenshot below:

    NewImage

    Changing your default password is important if your Raspberry Pi is connected to the Internet. SSH is enabled by default in the Raspbian image and this makes it vulnerable to hackers. Change your password and stay secure!

    … oh just make sure you don’t forget the new password!

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 12:00
    5 Pointers To Supercharge Your Raspberry Pi Projects @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi


    5pointers

    These five Pi techniques will help elevate you out of the beginner stages, from readwrite.

    However, there’s a steep jump-off point between the basics and the intermediate stuff. When you move from “setting up your Pi” tutorials to stuff like “building a media server,” the pre-project requirements start to get a little dicey. Many intermediate Pi tutorials, including some of the ones here on ReadWrite, assume a few things about your Raspberry Pi setup.

    Not every project will require all of the techniques suggested here, but knowing these procedures will make projects that do require them go much more smoothly later.

    When you’re ready to go beyond the basics, here are some things you can do to prepare your Raspberry Pi for any pre-requirements that a tutorial could throw at you.

    1) Using SSH

    SSH, which stands for Secure Shell, is a cryptographic network protocol that lets you securely transfer data between your computer and your Raspberry Pi. Projects might require it so you can control your Raspberry Pi from your computer’s command line without hooking it up to a monitor or keyboard.

    SSH now comes pre-installed in Raspberry Pi operating system Raspbian, so if you have installed the latest or close-to-latest version of NOOBS, you already have it.

    To use SSH, first you need your Pi’s IP address. Boot your Pi to the command line and type:

    sudo ifconfig

    Three paragraphs will appear. Your IP address will show up in either the first or the third line, depending on whether your Raspberry Pi is hooked up to an ethernet cable or via a wifi adaptor. If it’s ethernet, look in the first paragraph, which starts with “eth0.” If it’s wifi, look in the third paragraph, which starts with “wlan0.”

    Either way, you’ll see the words “inet addr” followed by an IP—something like 192.168.2.2, a pretty common default IP address that we’ll use for the duration of this article.

    Now you have the address that’ll allow you to access the Pi from your computer. If you’re on a Mac, you already have built-in SSH. Launch the Terminal application and type:

    ssh pi@192.168.2.2

    It’ll ask for your password. By default, this is always “raspberry.” If you’ve changed it to something else, use that instead. Now, you’re in!

    If you’re on a PC, there’s an extra step…

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 11:00
    12×32 LED Welcome to Class Bytes Raspberry Pi Demo #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    .

    12×32 LED Welcome to Class Bytes Raspberry Pi Demo:

    Worked on a 16×32 LED matrix from Adafruit.

    I am hoping to have a few demos ready for an upcoming event showing off the abilities of the Raspberry Pi at the Pflugerville Library.

    This is one of the demos – enjoy

    Read More.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 10:00
    Raspberry Pi’s Eben Upton: How we’re turning everyone into DIY hackers #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    NewImage

    The folks over at readwrite had the chance to talk to Raspberry Pi’s cofounder Eben Upton about the Raspberry Pi foundation, DIY hacking, programming, and more. Check out the full interview here.

    ReadWrite: What got you really interested in technology in the first place? How did that lead you eventually to the Raspberry Pi project?

    Eben Upton: So I actually got started when I was a kid. I have a father who has a certain amount of interest in engineering. He’s not an engineer, he’s an English academic. There were always piles of electrical stuff around the house that I used to play with before I understood what it did. Little things like making a light to have by your bed so you could read after “lights out” and stuff.

    And then I got a computer. In the UK we have these machines called BBC Microcomputers, which were 8-bit micros that were build for education. We had them at school, I got into programming at school, and I enjoyed it.

    These things weren’t necessarily in school for programming, or at least they didn’t tend to get used for programming. They would get used to run educational software. But I used to program on them. And then I bought one to program at home. I mean, the day I got my BBC micro, I went in my room, turned it on, and never came out again. [Laughs]

    Programming is amazing for a kid. When you’re a kid you don’t have a lot of power. You don’t have a lot of agency, a lot of control over the world around you. The great thing about programming is it’s a little world where you do whatever you want. And I certainly found that very compelling.

    I’d always been interested in science, math, kind of hard science subjects. Did a lot of computing, did a lot of programming on my BBC. I had a Commodore Amiga after that.

    At university I did a mixture of physics, engineering, and computer science. And then that really kind of led me to the Pi. Because after I’d been at university for a decade [while getting a doctorate], I realized that the kids who were arriving hadn’t had the chance to have that set of experiences as a child. You could still get Legos but … that ladder.

    We’d kind of pulled the ladder up after us. We built these very sophisticated and user-friendly computers for children to use now. Or not even computers—game consoles and phones and tablets, kind of appliances. But people were being denied that opportunity to tinker. So really Raspberry Pi is an attempt to get back—without kind of being too retro—some of what we kind of feel was lost from the evolution of computers over the last 25 years.

    NewImage

    RW: Tell me about inventing the Raspberry Pi.

    EU: We tried building some units based on what you’d call microcontroller technology. I don’t know if you’ve come across an [open source electronics prototyping] platform called Arduino? Sort of a similar level of performance to the Arduino. The nice thing about those chips is they’re very available, they’re commodity parts, they’re very cheap and easy to get ahold of.

    So we tried that. And we ended up with something which was technically a computer—you plug it into your television and stuff. But it was kind of primitive and it was clear that kids weren’t going to engage with it. So that was prototype one, and that prototype is coming to a museum in Ireland in an exhibition called “Fail.” [Laughs] I’m going to go see it next month. It’s in a glass cabinet as an example of a glorious failure.

    The nice thing about that was that was hand built. You can’t really build a modern Raspberry Pi by hand. But this one was primitive enough that you could actually solder it together and I soldered it together in a week. And it was a nice little toy.

    After I’d been at university for a decade of so, I went to work for a company called Broadcom, which is based in southern California but has a big office in Cambridge. They make cellphone chips. And we realized that cell phone chips are quite a good fit. They’re quite a good platform for building a Pi-like device, since they have a lot of graphics performance.

    I built a prototype based on that, based on a Broadcom dev kit. And that was much more powerful, much more capable, again at the same price point. But the challenge we had with that was that it was really a custom environment. It wasn’t a standards based platform.

    We were writing our own SD card drivers, our own file system, our own text editor. You find yourself doing a lot of basic work and although you end up with a platform which is powerful and programmable, it’s completely nonstandard [and] completely unlike any other machine. You don’t get to leverage any of the work that’s already been done by people on desktop platforms. That was prototype two.

    The real breakthrough for us was with prototype three. We got hold of another chip from Broadcom which had an ARM processor which was able to run standard Linux. That was really the point where we realized we had something that met all our goals. And that was the product we went to market with.

    NewImage

    RW: What does that say to you about the potential demand for DIY projects like the Pi? Are we all going to be DIY hackers one day?

    EU: Yeah, I mean, that’s the thing. There is an enormous demand for it. And I think that there is a tie to the maker community. The maker community is much more developed in American than it is in the UK. We do have maker fairs and hackerspaces now, but it’s probably five years behind where it is in the U.S.

    So one thing we found when we started talking about Raspberry Pi, when it started getting international attention, we found we were launching into this very well established community of people who like doing all sorts of DIY activity: knitting, or, you know, woodworking.

    So that’s one of the things that led to that surprise increase in volume for the Pi. Makers who see it as a component they can use to build their projects. Which is great!

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 09:00
    How to set up your Raspberry Pi camera module #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_pi



    The blog average man vs raspberry pi has a great post about setting up your Raspberry Pi’s camera module.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, I recently purchased a Raspberry Pi camera module to open up a whole new bag of Raspberry learning opportunities and potentially take some great videos as well.

    Before I jump into the code and start to take time-lapse videos of various pointless things, I thought it would be worthwhile to share some steps on of how to connect your camera module to your Pi, including a few things to look out for. This will be ‘Part 1′ of a series of camera module posts. Let’s begin…

    Read the full tutorial here.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 08:00
    Meet Jasper: Open-Source Voice Computing for your Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    Jasper, a customizable, open-source platform for developing voice-controlled applications for the Raspberry Pi, is basically Siri’s super cool cousin, via Raspberrypi.org. Jasper’s developers are Charlie Marsh & Shubhro Saha, two BSE students at Princeton University.

    Jasper already comes with modules to deal with things like time, weather, Gmail, playing your Spotify music, news (and what’s on Hacker News)…and knock knock jokes. You can build your own modules to add more functionality. We’re really impressed by how well-documented Jasper is; new developers should be able to get to grips with building on the platform very easily, and we’re looking forward to watching what you guys get up to with it.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 07:00
    Animated Setting up your Raspberry Pi (VIDEO) #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Animated Setting up your Raspberry Pi (VIDEO)

    How to set up your Raspberry Pi – animation by Saladhouse, voiced by Johnny Ball – for the Raspberry Pi Foundation

    And here’s a quick shout from Liz @ Raspberry Pi Foundation about the voice talent, who has been making learning about science, technology, and mathematics cool in the UK since the 1970s!

    That’s the LEGENDARY Johnny Ball. Johnny donated his time and his voice talent to the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and we couldn’t be more grateful: Johnny, please watch out for the postman next week, ‘cos we’re sending you a present to say thanks.

    Read More.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 06:00
    How to change the command line font size on your pi! #piday #raspberrypi @raspberry_pi



    Raspberry Pi Spy has a useful tutorial for changing the command line font size on your Raspberry Pi.

    If you are using your Raspberry Pi with a smaller screen you may want to change the font used on the command line to make it easier to read. I usually do this when I am using various portable LCD screens (eg the HDMIPi).

    It only changes the font within the console if you are using a screen connected directly to the Pi. It won’t affect Putty/SSH sessions.

    Changing the font size on the console is easy to do and there are two methods you can choose.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 00:02
    Collin’s Lab: Soldering



    It’s sad to think of all the awesome things that won’t be built because some folks are turned off by the idea of soldering. Such missed opportunity! Soldering is the fun!

    In an effort to demystify, clarify & familiarize, we bring you the above internet video. Please share it with someone who thinks soldering is “not for them” and to gether we can make the world a better place – filled with blinking circuitry!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:30
    Open Printable Prosthetics R&D Resources #maketheworld #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Open prosthetics

    It is deeply heartwarming to check in on the progress at e-NABLE and other open printable prosthetics project teams since the MakeTheWorld: Prosthetics Hangout Series wrapped up at the end of October. Many of those featured during that series are still actively pushing this research forward, and at quite a clip!

    MakerBlock is one of the desktop 3D printing superstars who has taken up this cause. He has documented and shared a number of significant resources to catch you up to date on the collective volunteer R&D efforts so far. Here’s a resource he shared from those involved in university research into this topic:

    Marc Petrykowski of Creighton University was kind enough to provide some additional practical experience and information about the university’s research study into printable prosthetics.  For anyone looking to dive into this project, I’m cross-posting the information from the e-NABLE Google Plus group here.1 I’ve adjusted the formatting slightly, but otherwise everything below are Marc’s words.

    What exact measurements do you need (e.g., hand-length from where to where?)

    Below are photos of all of the measurements I use for designing a hand.2 Yes it does seem like a lot, but all of them are needed to ensure the best custom fit for the hand we make for the user. When making a custom hand, it is important to make the 3D printed hand as similar to the non effect hand (fingers, width, length, etc). Each hand also has to be custom because of the size (length, width, height) or the stump. Some are very tiny and some are much bigger, so that also plays a big role when you have to design a hand. There are two photos that are measuring angle of flexion and extension. Those are important to see how tight or how loose the hand has to be for the power and strength of the individual and to make the hand as functional as possible.

    How do you get them from scans etc.

    Scans from our 3D scanner are in the format .STL which can be imported into programs such as blender (Shown below). Then I can lay it into the preexisting hand design and see an image of how it will fit, including the gauntlet size. If there are further changes to be made, I can do it all in blender before the print.

    How do you apply those measurements to your model

    1. As stated above, the measurements matter for the size of the hand. You can’t have a hand that is much smaller then the opposite hand, but you also can’t have a hand that is too small or large for the stump. Everything has to be customize depending on each case. This is where the designing takes the longest. My goal as the designer and printer is to make the hand as near perfect as the other hand so it feels the same to the body and brain, thus they will respond with the effected hand like it was their real non effected hand. Also as stated above, the degrees of flexion and extension and the size/length of the fingers are all incorporated into the final design before the printing the hand.
    2. And if, as +Jorge Zuniga suggests, ALL parts can be pre-printed, I’m hoping you guys will take the lead in helping us make it easy.  (As easy as buying shoes at a shoe store)
    3. This is possible because all of the redesigning and redoing of the measurements are all done in blender. Remember, if you resize a finger to a certain percentage, then you have to do the same for the rest of the fingers, thumb, phalanges, palm, and the gauntlet. That is how you can print everything off as one complete print.

    Visit Makerblock’s complete post for the rest of the FAQ as well as other great resources!

    OpenPrintedProsthetics


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:26
    Migrate Arduino Code to C Code on New Microcontroller / Adafruit Jobs Board


    Arduino

    Migrate Arduino Code to C Code on New Microcontroller / Adafruit Jobs Board

    JoyLabz is looking for a computer engineer to transition Arduino code written for the ATmega32u4 to an cheaper, shorter lead time microcontroller. This is essentially a re-engineering of the Makey Makey (makeymakey.com) circuit board to a new MCU.

    Hardware:

    Select a new chip meeting the technical and business requirements for the project (5V, 20 to 22 digital i/o, USB HID, comparable power) such as Silicon Labs C8051F38x or Cypress CY8C32.

    The chip should be widely available and cost less than ATMega32u4 in bulk. The chip should have built in USB HID support and the vendor should allow registration of a PID under their VID.

    Software:

    Reimplement the existing Arduino C code (approx 750 lines) on the new MCU. This will include implementation of some Arduino libraries (see code link) if necessary.

    Add one new feature for key remapping (it’s a hack!) (estimated 200 lines code)

    Candidate:

    The eligible candidate should be an expert with writing software on 8-bit MCUs in Arduino and C.

    Show previous experience with writing on the selected platform or similar capability.

    Timeline goal is 1 month. Please submit a resume or website detailing your experience with similar projects and your rate for consideration.

    Learn More

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