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  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 13:00
    Anti-Surveillance Hair & Makeup Party #WearableWednesday
  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 12:00
    FastCo Story on CuteCircuit #WearableWednesday

    cutecircuit

    Geek Gets Chic With CuteCircuit’s High-Tech Fashion @FastCo Design:

    The problem with wearable tech is that all too often it simply isn’t wearable. Some designs are so aggressively nerdy-looking that the fashion-conscious won’t even think about donning them.

    London-based company CuteCircuit is trying to change that. Designers Francesca Rosella and Ryan Genz marry high fashion and high tech on the runway, making clothes that are as breathtaking as they are sophisticated.

    CuteCircuit’s newest collection recently debuted in a sci-fi fantasy of a runway show at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week. It featured glittering garments equipped with LED lights and models who used a smartphone app to make their outfits change color, glow in the dark, and play video loops.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 11:30
    From Jawbone to GoPro, Venture Money Flows Into Hardware #WearableWednesday

    From Jawbone to GoPro, Venture Money Flows Into Hardware @ WSJ.com.

    A hardware startup is still hard, but it is getting a little easier. The growing availability of 3-D printers and starter kits with easy-to-program circuit boards makes it simpler and cheaper to produce prototypes. Contract manufacturers stand ready to handle mass production and unravel supply-chain tangles. New fundraising techniques help entrepreneurs get started and test demand.

    The result: U.S. venture capitalists completed a record 31 fundraising deals for consumer-electronics makers last year, eclipsing the previous high of 29 in 1999, according to DJX VentureSource. They pumped $848 million into hardware startups, nearly twice the prior record of $442 million set in 2012.

    The flurry of deals included new funding for Jawbone, which makes wireless audio equipment and an activity-tracking wristband, set-top-box manufacturer Roku Inc. and camera startup Lytro Inc.

    “It’s definitely the dawn of a golden age of hardware,” said Scott Miller, chief executive of Cambridge, Mass.-based Dragon Innovation Inc., which advises hardware startups and helps them raise money.

    Read more.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 11:00
    MakeFashion on Solarbotics Flickr #WearableWednesday

    makefashion

    There’s not much info to accompany these fantastic photos of what is only called “MakeFashion” on Solarbotics’ Flickr stream. Outrageously awesome! If you’ve got more info, post up in the comments.

    makefashoin2

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 10:00
    Buckle up Tron Style #WearableWednesday

    HaloBelt

    Being visible at night is always a concern, whether you are riding your bike or just walking your dog. This LED belt spotted on Design You Trust is designed to keep you seen. There are some pretty gnarly statistics concerning pedestrians killed by autos, to the tune of 275K per year. So, this Halo Belt 2.0 is on a mission to protect anyone on the road. Think of all the potential users, including cops, joggers, children, military, roadside workers, and cyclists. That’s a lot of potential users.

    Apparently the company got its original start in 2012 on Kickstarter. So, they know how this belt thing works. Their site tells the story.

    We have utilized the feedback of early supporters and Kickstarter backers to create our new Halo Belt. The Halo Belt 2.0 has been redesigned to be brighter and rechargeable. We have also integrated our custom designed LED fiber optic system and 3M reflective elastic onto the belt that can be adjusted to the desired size and length to accommodate most users.

    Usually when you think of protective gear, the first thing that comes to mind is those reflective vests. Apparently they don’t hold up to a Halo.

    Since reflective jackets are only visible when a light source is projected onto it, it would be impossible to spot someone in the dark. We have designed the Halo Belt 2.0 to have a combination of high quality 3M reflectives as well as our illuminating LED fiber optic technology. This helps the user stay visible when he or she may not be in direct headlight projection.

    Considering most drivers are looking at their phones, that means less reaction time. So, better to go with the glow and hope that you are seen a few seconds in advance. Speaking of glow, check out our kit to make your own LED Belt.

    ledbelt_LRG


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 09:00
    This shirt will let you feel what players experience on the field #WearableWednesday

    Wearable Tech Insider posted this awesome video of a shirt that lets viewers experience the sensation of what players feel on the field.

    It’s the ultimate insider’s sport fan gear. Imagine wearing your favorite player’s jersey, but clothes being tricked out to receive sensations of what the player is feeling as he’s on the field.

    They’re trying it out in Australia. Foxtel and the agency CHE Proximity worked with three Australian Rules Football players – Scott Pendlebury, Luke Hodge and Trent Cotchin. The three donned sensors and “recorded” what it felt like to get tackled, to kick a ball, to score. During broadcasts, fans who wear shirts equipped with the proper technology — Bluetooth, haptic sensors — will be sent appropriate sensations in real time. See the tackle, feel the tackle.

    One presumes the sensations will be a little tamped down; having a couch potato experience an actual tackle might be a little … intense.

    Read more.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 08:00
    Finger Commands with Ring #WearableWednesday

    GestureRing

    You’ve always dreamed of waving your hand around like Minority Report and now you’ve got your chance, according to the International Business Times. This new ring, which recently got funded on Kickstarter, allows the user to use small finger gestures to command things like text messages, paying bills and even controlling appliances. Looks like fun, right? It’s called the obvious — Ring.

    If a you want to send a text message, just draw the shape of an envelope in the air. Want to take a photograph? Just draw the shape of a camera and Ring will take a picture with the camera on your phone. In order to actually type a message using Ring, you would have to spell out words by drawing them in the air with your finger, which could be useful if you just want to reply “OK” or “5mins” but could become troublesome for longer sentences.

    You are probably thinking the same thing we are, “what if you are a sloppy writer?” Luckily there is an app that has you covered. It allows you to alter the pattern to make it easier for Ring to understand you. Check out the video that shows the font and functionality (love the lamp dimming).

    Logbar Inc., the creators, have covered all bases, with Ring working on iOS and Android phones, tablets, PCs, Google Glass, and some smartwatches. They’ve also made it social media and smarthome device friendly. What’s really exciting is that it represents one of the smaller and smarter wearable tech products we’ve seen. It takes its cue from the natural human behavior of pointing, which means it will be easier to adopt.

    Although uses so far suggest the practical, it would be interesting to see an interactive art piece conducted by this ring. Perhaps we will witness a new way to spin tunes — in the air. Ring has made their app open source for developers, so you can join in on the fun. Not quite there yet, but attracted to devices that react to movement? You should check out our guide to Motion Sensors; it’s a good place to start.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 07:00
    Scough is a stylish scarf that filters out germs and pollution #WearableWednesday

    NewImage

    CrunchWear has posted about this fun new scarf that will let you walk fearlessly through the dirty streets of your city.

    The cold weather may be abating somewhat but that doesn’t mean we aren’t in for any more chilly days, particularly in the early parts of spring(not to mention next winter, and the eternal winter after that which is our souls.) One of the best, and easiest, accessories for avoiding winter chill is the humble scarf…

    Introducing the Scough, a scarf that filters out pollution and germs with the best of them, all the while remaining as stylish as anything else in your wardrobe. The secret here is an activated carbon filter that also contains a slight layer of silver. The end result is maximization of germ and pollution fighting power. Staying healthy is always a good thing, particularly if a zombie apocalypse-inducing germ is floating around like on the TV.

    The Scough comes in a variety of hip styles. After all, it was designed in Brooklyn(slight sarcasm intended, even though I do live there.) You can head on over to their website and pick one up for around $39. Happy scarf hunting!

    Read more.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 06:00
    Feel Football Games with this Shirt #WearableWednesday

    You’ve got your nom noms spread out on the coffee table ready for the big game. Now you slip on your special shirt, ready to feel every tackle, while safely being a couch potato. Sounds fun, right? According to Digital Trends, the Alert Shirt is going to make your sport fantasy come true.

    The Alert Shirt connects to your smartphone using Bluetooth, and is filled with tiny motors which attempt to replicate how a football player feels at key moments during a game. Think haptic feedback on a larger scale, and against your body rather than the tip of your finger.

    It has been created as a promotional tool for Fox Footy subscribers in Australia, provided they sign-up for 12-months of access to Rupert Murdoch’s dedicated Australian Rules Football channel. Known for being a tough, hard-hitting sport, the thought of being on the receiving end of any punishment handed out in an Aussie Rules match doesn’t sound particularly pleasant.

    Alert Shirt

    There have been DIY’ers making Arduino scarves and t-shirts that can create a vibration sensation for the wearer, but this technology is more sophisticated because it is using a lot more data. Think of it as creating several event possibilities for the wearer, rather than just one.

    It’s not some half-hearted attempt to make the wearer feel closer to the action either. Apparently, data regarding what happens in a match is already being collected. It’s then matched to new impact and sensory data collected during training sessions, sent to Fox’s dedicated app, and finally to the sensors in the shirt during a live game.

    The effects aren’t only felt when a player gets tackled, as the shirt also “flutters” to simulate a player’s nerves before an important kick, and amps up to replicate the elation after scoring. It’s all in real-time too. According to a spokesperson, the Alert Shirt is the closest we can get to feeling what a player feels, just by watching the game.

    So far this fan sport garment is only going to do you some good in Australia. So, either book your trip or start tackling construction of your own gear. Make your own touchdown hoodie using our FLORA microcontroller and a Vibrating Mini Motor Disc. Then you just have to figure out how you are going to get the touchdown info to your shirt — maybe with a WIFI or BlueTooth shield. Build it and your friends will come.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 05:00
    Epilepsy aid uses wearable sensors to predict seizures and call for help #WearableWednesday

    NewImage

    dezeen has the story on this wearable sensor that could help save the lives of those living with epilepsy.

    The Dialog device, developed by American technology company Artefact, would use a wearable sensor and an iPhone app to help monitor patients’ vital signs and keep a log of conditions leading up to, during, and after a seizure.

    “There are currently three million epilepsy sufferers in America, and it is the third most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s and stroke,” said Matthew Jordan, the project leader…

    The Dialog would deal with the problem by creating a digital network that connects the person living with epilepsy to caregivers, doctors, and members of the public who have installed the Dialog app with data and instructions on how to give assistance.

    The user attaches a nodule to the skin, which can be done either using transparent adhesive paper or by wearing it in a bracket that looks like a watch.

    Using a series of sensors that monitors hydration, temperature, and heart rate, it gathers information on the wearer and stores the data on a smartphone.

    Additionally, the sensor would prompt the wearer to take medication and record mood through the sensor’s touchscreen, and logs information about local climate conditions that could increase the likelihood of a seizure.

    In the event of a fit, the wearer simply grasps the sensor, which alerts a caregiver and anyone within close proximity of the sufferer who has downloaded the app.

    “It helps possible first responders be notified that a patient who is nearby is having a sustained seizure, directs the bystander to the patient, gives instructions on how to help the patient through the emergency, and affords a direct line of communication to the family caregiver,” said Jordan.

    When the seizure ends, information about the length of the seizure, along with other contextual information, is displayed on the user’s smartphone to help reorient themselves.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 23:32
    NEW PRODUCT – 2.8 TFT LCD with Touchscreen Breakout Board w/MicroSD Socket

    1770 LRG

    NEW PRODUCT – 2.8 TFT LCD with Touchscreen Breakout Board w/MicroSD Socket : Add some jazz & pizazz to your project with a color touchscreen LCD. This TFT display is big (2.8″ diagonal) bright (4 white-LED backlight) and colorful! 240×320 pixels with individual RGB pixel control, this has way more resolution than a black and white 128×64 display. As a bonus, this display has a resistive touchscreen attached to it already, so you can detect finger presses anywhere on the screen.

    This display has a controller built into it with RAM buffering, so that almost no work is done by the microcontroller. The display can be used in two modes: 8-bit and SPI. For 8-bit mode, you’ll need 8 digital data lines and 4 or 5 digital control lines to read and write to the display (12 lines total). SPI mode requires only 5 pins total (SPI data in, data out, clock, select, and d/c) but is slower than 8-bit mode. In addition, 4 pins are required for the touch screen (2 digital, 2 analog) or you can purchase and use our resistive touchscreen controller (not included) to use I2C or SPI

    1770 rainbow LRG

    We wrapped up this display into an easy-to-use breakout board, with SPI connections on one end and 8-bit on the other. Both are 3-5V compliant with high-speed level shifters so you can use with any microcontroller. If you’re going with SPI mode, you can also take advantage of the onboard MicroSD card socket to display images. (microSD card not included, but any will work)

    Of course, we wouldn’t just leave you with a datasheet and a “good luck!”. For 8-bit interface fans we’ve written a full open source graphics library that can draw pixels, lines, rectangles, circles, text, and more. For SPI users, we have a library as well, its separate from the 8-bit library since both versions are heavily optimized. We also have a touch screen library that detects x, y and z (pressure) and example code to demonstrate all of it.

    Follow our step by step guide for wiring, code and drawing. You’ll be running in 15 minutes

    1770 Flower 01 LRG
    If you are using an Arduino-shaped microcontroller, check out our TFT shield version of this same display, with SPI control and a touch screen controller as well

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 22:00
    Make Your Eyes Glow with LEDs

    glowing eyes

    Want to achieve wicked-looking, glowing eyes with a simple trick? Kamui Cosplay suggests wrapping LEDs around your head. I’d recommend pulling them farther apart than what you seen in the photo so the LEDs are more on your peripheral than right in front of your eyes. You could even achieve the same creepy effect if you pull the LEDs only to your temples. Kamui did state she wore the bright lights for about 30 minutes for a show without any issues. Here’s how she did it:

    Many cool fictional characters have glowing eyes. Did you know, that it’s super easy to build this in reality? Just connect two LEDs, cover a part of the wire with silicone and glue these silicone stripes with skin glue to your temple!

    It looks like an easier solution than wearing painful contacts, even if they can only be worn for a short time. You could even paint the inside edges of the LED to further block the light. However, if you’re at all worried about them hurting your eyes, skip them altogether.

    Get more tips from Kamui Cosplay at Facebook.

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 20:59
    NEW PRODUCTS – The MagPi Issues 18 and 19

    Screenshot 3 18 14 3 48 PM

    NEW PRODUCTS – The MagPi Issues 18 and 19: About The MagPi – from The MagPi themselves!

    We produce a magazine with the intent to help and offer advice to users of the Raspberry Pi. This started out as a simple idea on the well known forums, with a few of us getting together and deciding on a loose outline of what we wanted to achieve.

    From issue 18:

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has just released the Pi NoiR, an adapted version of their camera with the infra-red filter removed. This month, there’s a great article from Andrew Back of RS Components, where he takes you through the steps he used to create a night vision camera to catch critters in his back garden.

    Issue 18 introduces you to a great program called PiVision which brings an attractive GUI, allowing you to control the module through its native apps. This month features a very informative article on the Raspberry Pi at CERN and a look at using Scratch with BrickPi.

    There is also the first in a series of articles titled ‘Project Curacao’, an environmental monitoring system utilizing the Raspberry Pi which will be hung unattended on a radio tower on the island nation of Curacao. Exotic!

    From issue 19:

    Are you bored of having your presents delivered by the post office? If you fancy a change, why not have your own Pi-powered quadcopter air drop them in? Andy Baker begins his series on building this flying machine. In this issue, he covers the parts required, their function, and some of the coding used for lift off.

    There’s also a great article on OpenELEC, bringing you On Demand TV to your Raspberry Pi so you never have to miss an episode again! Claire Price continues with a fantastic article on Sonic Pi which will have your Raspberry Pi performing sing-alongs.

    If you want to be savvy with your heating and electricity bills, without turning the thermostat down, why not cast your eye over an article on environmental monitoring. Alternatively, to warm you up, the MagPi returns to Project Curacao to look at the environmental subsystem used in this remote sensing project.

    Finally, if that’s not enough to keep you busy, why not paint an electronic masterpiece with XLoBorg? Andy Wilson looks at scrolling an RSS feed on an LCD via GPIO plus we pay a visit to the Pi Store.

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 20:00
    Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine (VIDEO)

    Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine:

    Vending machines generally offer up sodas, candy bars and chips. Not so for the one created by TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo. This artist has dreamed up a DNA Vending Machine, which dispenses extracted human DNA, packaged in a vial along with a collectible photo of the person who gave it. It’s charming and quirky, but points out larger ethical issues that will arise as access to biotechnology increases.

    Read More.

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 19:06
    New Raspberry Pi camera mode released @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi

    NewImage

    Raspberrypi.org has sorted out a new set of mode for their camera board. They are also calling for pictures and video using the new mode and will feature the best entries on their site!

    When the Raspberry Pi camera was released, the eagle-eyed among you noticed that the camera hardware itself can support various high frame rate modes, but that the software could ‘only’ manage 30 frames per second in its high-definition video mode.

    There’s is no hardware limitation in the Raspberry Pi itself. It’s quite capable of handling these high frame rate modes, but it does require a certain amount of effort to work out these new ‘modes’ inside the camera software. At the original release of the camera, two modes were provided: a stills capture mode, which offers the full resolution of the sensor (2592×1944), and a 1080p video mode (1920x1080p). Those same eagle-eyed people will see that these modes have different aspect ratios – the ratio of width to height. Stills outputs 4:3 (like 35mm film), video 16:9 (wide screen).

    This creates a problem when previewing stills captures, since the preview uses the video mode so it can run at 30 frames per second (fps) – not only is the aspect of the preview different, but because the video mode ‘crops’ the sensor (i.e. takes a 1920×1080 windows from the centre), the field of view in preview mode is very different from the actual capture.

    We had some work to do to develop new modes for high frame rates, and also fix the stills preview mode so that is matches the capture mode.

    So now, finally, some very helpful chaps at Broadcom, with some help from Omnivision, the sensor manufacturer, have found some spare time to sort out these modes, and not just that but to add some extra goodness while they were at it. (Liz interjects: The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not part of Broadcom – we’re a customer of theirs – but we’ve got a good relationship and the Foundation’s really grateful for the volunteer help that some of the people at Broadcom offer us from time to time. You guys rock: thank you!)

    The result is that we now have a set of mode as follows :

    • 2592×1944 1-15fps, video or stills mode, Full sensor full FOV, default stills capture
    • 1920×1080 1-30fps, video mode, 1080p30 cropped
    • 1296×972 1-42fps, video mode, 4:3 aspect binned full FOV. Used for stills preview in raspistill.
    • 1296×730 1-49fps, video mode, 16:9 aspect , binned, full FOV (width), used for 720p
    • 640×480 42.1-60fps, video mode, up to VGAp60 binned
    • 640×480 60.1-90fps, video mode, up to VGAp90 binned

    I’ve introduced a new word in the that list. Binned. This is how we can get high frame rates. Binning means combining pixels from the sensor together in a ‘bin’ in the analogue domain. As well as reducing the amount of data, this can also improve low light performance as it averages out sensor ‘noise’ in the absence of quantisation noise introduced by the analogue to digital converters (ADCs), which are the bits of electronics in the sensor that convert the analogue information created by incoming photons to digital numbers.

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NewImage

    Raspberry Pi Camera Board – The Raspberry Pi Camera Module is a custom designed add-on for Raspberry Pi. It attaches to Raspberry Pi by way of one of the two small sockets on the board upper surface. This interface uses the dedicated CSI interface, which was designed especially for interfacing to cameras. The CSI bus is capable of extremely high data rates, and it exclusively carries pixel data. Read more.


  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 19:00
    This Paper Microscope Costs Just 97 Cents #makereducation

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    Foldscope, a $.97 paper microscope, is a great tool for educators on a budget, from Smithsonianmag:

    Microscopes have come a long way since eyeglass makers started using their lenses to look closer and closer at the world around them. But they’ve also gotten a lot more expensive. A modern scanning electron microscope could cost a lab $250,000. A nice desktop scope will set you back anywhere from $500 to $1,000—not a practical purchase, and sometimes out of the budget for clinics and research projects that could really use one.

    What would an affordable microscope look like? Well, it’d be simple, and it’d be made out of cheap materials, but it would still be good enough to get the job done. It might look something like a microscope made out of paper, for less than a dollar.

    Stanford scientists have developed what they call the Foldscope, a paper microscope that fits in your pocket and can be assembled in the field, in a lab, or anywhere you are. You can watch creator Manu Prakash talking about and assembling the scope in the video above. And it works too. According to Foldscope:

    Foldscope is an origami-based print-and-fold optical microscope that can be assembled from a flat sheet of paper. Although it costs less than a dollar in parts, it can provide over 2,000X magnification with sub-micron resolution (800nm), weighs less than two nickels (8.8 g), is small enough to fit in a pocket (70 × 20 × 2 mm3), requires no external power, and can survive being dropped from a 3-story building or stepped on by a person. Its minimalistic, scalable design is inherently application-specific instead of general-purpose, gearing towards applications in global health, field based citizen science and K12-science education.

    Foldscope is also currently looking for people to help them test out their origami contraption:

    We will be choosing 10,000 people who would like to test the microscopes in a variety of settings and help us generate an open source biology/microscopy field manual written by people from all walks of life.

    From clinics in Nigeria to field sites in that Amazon, the scope could give people a cheaper, easier way to access the tiny worlds around them.

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 18:53
    From STEAM to STREAM

    Stream crop

    This redesign of the Evil Mad Scientist STEAM t-shirt includes Robotics!

    Over at RasterWeb, Pete writes:

    I love the Evil Mad Scientist STEAM T-shirt but I thought there was something missing, so I changed it to STREAM because… Robots.

    Remember to stream big, my friends!

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 18:22
    NEW PRODUCT – Wolfson Audio Card

    NewImage

    NEW PRODUCT – Wolfson Audio Card: The Wolfson Audio Card, produced by Element14 in collaboration with Wolfson, offers Raspberry Pi® users similar flexibility to a PC sound-card to capture audio alongside their camera, and experiment with stereo digital capture and playback.

    This audiophile-quality add-on is great for intense audio experimenters! If you just want to have higher-quality audio playback, check out our low cost USB audio card, it’s perfect for playing music, movie soundtracks, etc. and works well with the Pi.

    NewImage

    The Wolfson Pi Audio Card is based on Wolfson WM5102 audio hub codes. The WM5102 is a highly-integrated low-power audio system for smartphones, tablets and other portable audio devices. It combines wide-band telephony voice processing with a flexible, high-performance audio hub CODEC. The WM5102 digital core provides a powerful combination of fixed-function signal processing blocks with a programmable DSP. These are supported by a fully-flexible, all-digital audio mixing and routing engine with sample rate converters, for wide use-case flexibility. Two stereo headphone drivers each provide stereo ground-referenced or mono BTL outputs, with noise levels as low as 2.3µVRMS for hi-fi quality line or headphone output. The CODEC also features stereo 2W Class-D speaker outputs, a dedicated BTL earpiece output and PDM for external speaker amplifiers. A signal generator for controlling haptics devices is included; vibe actuators can connect directly to the Class-D speaker output, or via an external driver on the PDM output interface. All inputs, outputs and system interfaces can function concurrently.

    Ideal for applications including VoIP, gaming, high quality audio capture, digital audio processing, and audio rendering. XBMC and media streaming, internet radio, networked audio, and DLNA audio rendering.

    Caution! The Wolfson Audio Card comes with a very small translucent screw that helps connect it to the Raspberry Pi. Be careful when you open your package! Only for use with Rev 2(Model A or B) Raspberry Pi’s with the P5 Header.

    NewImage
    In stock and shipping now!

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 18:00
    Glowing sculptures that visualize bitcoin and bullet wounds #ArtTuesday

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    Seen above is James Clar’s work entitled Two Times One Sun- a visualization of the sun from two different perspectives, rising and setting. Wired has a great piece on the artist and his work which features 3D printing, glowy lights, and clear, complex work.

    James Clar insists that he’s not a control freak, though there’s evidence that suggests otherwise. For starters, Clar’s studio is impressively tidy. The Brooklyn-based artist’s studio is filled with wires, 3-D printed components and his bold-colored fluorescent sculptures, but everything has its place. “I try to keep very orderly and structured and systematic,” he says. “Otherwise things get out of control.”

    Then there’s the fact that the artist himself kinda admits it: “A lot of the work I do is about control,” he tells me. “I’m trying to have control over the medium.” Even with a confession like this, control freak isn’t quite right. The word connotes uptightness, a lack of flexibility, neither of which describes the very genial Clar or his colorful work.

    “What I do is a craft,” he clarifies. “And I treat it like a craft.” Clar is known for creating glowing light installations out of linear fluorescent tubes. The artist builds his lighting systems from scratch, beginning by designing each piece in computer programs like Adobe Illustrator and Maya. Though the lights look neon, it’s actually just a clever use of colored filters, which Clar prints out via a high-resolution printer and slips inside the tubes to create the glowing colors you see. Then using a Makerbot, he prints customized electrical connectors that hold each piece together and hide the wire routing.

    NewImage

    The piece above is called Bitcoin Spiral and displays data taken from the Mt.Gox bitcoin market which it then displays on the lights in the work.

    It’s a complex system distilled down to a clean, streamlined finished product. All of Clar’s works have a sense of purpose, which is perhaps the most compelling thing about they outside of their bold aesthetics. “For the most part I’m not really into art that’s messy or happenstance,” he says.

    Read more.

    NewImage

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 16:00
    Get OpenCV up and running on #BeagleBoneBlack @TXInstruments @BeagleBoardOrg

    YouTube user, Michael Robinson, shows us how to get OpenCV up and running on the BeagleBone Black.


    BeagleBone Adafruit Industries Unique fun DIY electronics and kitsEach Tuesday is BeagleBone Black Day here Adafruit! What is the BeagleBone? The BeagleBones are a line of affordable single-board Linux computers (SBCs) created by Texas Instruments. New to the Bone? Grab one of our Adafruit BeagleBone Black Starter Packs and check out our extensive resources available on the Adafruit Learning System including a guide to setting up the Adafruit BeagleBone IO Python Library. We have a number of Bone accessories including add-on shields (called “capes”) and USB devices to help you do even more with your SBC. Need a nice display to go along with your Bone? Check out our fine selection of HDMI displays, we’ve tested all of them with the Beagle Bone Black!

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