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  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 19:45
    10 Tools and Techniques for Light Painting

    firewallModern light painters have developed a rich variety of original tools and methods to create their art.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 19:00
    DIY Gas Can Speakers Blast Your Tunes

    Gas Can Speaker

    Have you ever wanted to build your own speakers, but were a bit overwhelmed with all the information out there on cases and packaging? A recent Instructable by [Txje] goes over how to build a set of simple gas can speakers.

    While using gas cans as speaker housings will not result in the best audiophile quality sound or be the cheapest option out there, it sure looks awesome, and is a great way to get started with building your own speakers. After testing out the speakers and electronics, holes in the gas cans are cut and the terminals and speakers are installed. “As an added bonus, the pour spout serves to release pressure in the speaker can. You can get everything you need for ~$69 from Amazon and/or Home Depot.” Not a bad price point for two very cool looking speakers.  Once you have built the speakers, now you can experiment with different fill material to see what results in better sound quality.

    This is a simple, yet fun looking build. Something like this can make a nice gift for someone who spends a lot of time in their garage. What other crazy objects have you used for speaker enclosures?

    Filed under: digital audio hacks

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 19:00
    DIY How To Mount A USB Thumb Drive For @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi


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    Make your Raspberry Pi a media sharing friendly device with a mounted USB Thumb Drive. by scottkildall

    This is another one of my “meat-and-potatoes” Raspberry Pi Instructables.

    What this Instructable will show you how to do is to configure your Raspberry Pi to recognize and automatically mount a USB thumb drive. This is especially useful for exchanging files, running backups and using your Pi as a media device.

    Before doing this Instructable, please make sure you have your Raspberry Pi up and running, which you can do with The Ultimate Raspberry Pi Configuration Guide Instructable.

    I’m using the Mac OS for this guide, but you can extend the principles to other operating systems.

    See Full Tutorial

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 18:30
    Recreate Amazing Images With StipleGen’s Stipple Diagrams #Eggbot


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    StippleGen’s easy to use software generates high quality stipples for Eggbot via Windel at Evil Mad Scientist

    One of the perennial problems that we have come across in a variety of contexts, including CNC artwork and producing artwork for the Egg-Bot, is the difficulty of creating good-quality toolpaths– i.e., vector artwork representing halftones –when starting from image files. One of the finest solutions that we’ve ever come across is Adrian Secord’s algorithm, which uses an iterative relaxation process to optimize a weighted Voronoi diagram, mathematically producing a set of points (stipples) that can closely approach the appearance of a traditional stipple drawing.

    Another important technique is TSP art, where the image is represented by a single continuous path. You can generate a path like this by connecting all of the dots in a stipple diagram. Designing a route that visits each dot exactly once (and minimizing the distance travelled) is an example of the famous Travelling Salesman Problem (or just “TSP”), and an optimal TSP path can give a surprisingly good grayscale representation of an image. From the standpoint of toolpaths (for the Egg-bot and most other CNC machines), a TSP path is even nicer than stipples, because little or no time is spent raising and lowering the tool.

    StippleGen is easy-to-use software that can generate TSP and stipple drawings from input images. It saves its files as editable, Eggbot-ready Inkscape SVG files, which can in turn be opened by other vector graphics programs, or re-saved as PDF files for use in other contexts. It can also generate a TSP path from the stippled image, and either save that path as an SVG file or simply use that path as the order of plotting for the stipple diagram.

    You can read an extended introduction to StippleGen at Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories. An introduction to StippleGen version 2 is also available here.

    It is worth pointing out, right up front, that our software does not fill a vacuum. StippleGen is not the first, fastest, or most accurate software yet developed to produce stipples or TSP paths. Rather, it is designed to be easy to install, easy to use, and easy to modify. It is capable of producing excellent quality output with up to 10,000 points, when speed is not a primary concern.

    While Adrian Secord’s own stippling software is no longer available for download, there are a few other codebases worth of note. In particular, the weighted voronoi stippler at

    saliences.com has a Windows executable, and runs as a command-line utility. And there are also a number of fast TSP solvers, including Concorde, which is available with a GUI for Windows.

    Read More

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 18:00
    Cook and Hold with Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Sébastien Rinsoz wrote up this great tutorial on how to set up a thermocouple and Raspberry Pi to monitor the temperature of meat cooking in the oven and then emailing you when the meat has reached its ideal temperature.

    When we geek try to cook a nice chunk of meat, the tricky part is the cooking itself. Instead of sitting idle while the meat cooks, we go read something on the iPad, code some stuff or even to talk with the guests rather than watching a meat in the oven. And at the end, the meat is often overcooked. But this is gonna change. Our new recipe, using a Yocto-Thermocouple and Raspberry Pi, solves the issue. The Raspberry Pi will monitor the meat temperature for us, and send an e-mail as soon as the ideal temperature is reached. And long life to the smartphones!

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 17:44
    New Products 4/16/2014 (video)
  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 17:09
    New Review: Review: Mindsensors Accelerometer-Compass Sensor

    IMG_8908This gyro-accelerometer-compass sensor is just what your Mindstorms robot needs to keep itself pointed in the right direction.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 17:00
    How And Why To Build A Virtual Private Network #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    Building A Raspberry Pi VPN Part One How And Why To Build A Server ReadWrite

    Use a Raspberry Pi to build a server that encrypts your Web data from prying eyes. via Lauren Orsini

    Free, unencrypted wireless is everywhere, but you shouldn’t be checking your bank account on it unless you don’t mind somebody else snooping. The solution? A virtual private network, or VPN.

    A VPN extends your own private network into public places, so even if you’re using Starbucks’ Wi-Fi connection, your Internet browsing stays encrypted and secure.

    There are plenty of ways to set up a VPN, both with free and paid services, but each solution has its own pros and cons, determined by the way the VPN provider operates and charges and the kinds of VPN options it provides.

    The easiest and cheapest solution to keep your data safe is to just abstain from public Wi-Fi completely. But that sounds a little extreme to me when it’s relatively simple and inexpensive to build your own VPN server at home, and run it off of a tiny, inexpensive ($35) Raspberry Pi.

    My Raspberry Pi is about the size of a smartphone, but it runs a fully functional VPN server. That means no matter where I am, I can connect my computer to my home network and access shared files and media over a secure connection. It came in handy on a recent trip to Boston, where I was still able to watch videos stored on my network back home in DC.

    This is the part where I’d link you to a handy tutorial on how to set this up. The problem is one doesn’t exist—or at least one that could satisfy this average computer user. And while there are plenty of tutorials about how to set up a VPN server on Raspberry Pi, there are very few that explain why.

    I read several different tutorials and cobbled together the results into this semi-coherent tutorial for setting up a VPN on Raspberry Pi, which even I can understand, complete with the why behind the how.

    So follow me down the cryptography rabbit hole and learn that no matter how paranoid you are, whoever came up with the methods to generate VPNs was even more so.

    See Full Tutorial

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 17:00
    Some new products @sparkfun from @adafruit + @scanlime #fadecandy





    SparkFun is stocking some more Adafruit products, check out their latest video all about the FadeCandy, our collaboration with Micah from Scanlime. If you want to see more products on SparkFun let them know and of course pick up Adafruit stuff if you’re over there, it’s is a good way to let them know :)

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:01
    We’re Not Joking Around; Something BIG is Coming

    Hackaday Something BIG LogoCountdown timer, a special presentation on the first of this month, and now there’s been some weekly mystery posts. What are we playing at? We’re not playing. This is real.

    That timer is now below the 10-day mark and with every passing minute we become more giddy about the unrelenting awesome that is to come. Want to know what we’re talking about without waiting until the end? Are you a clever person? Then you might just be able to figure it all out. Try to unlock the clues from past weeks, and hit the Freenode ##hackaday channel on IRC if you need some hints (we’re certainly not going to post spoilers here).

    We wouldn’t mind some help with a whisper campaign as well. Spout your conspiracy theories, and your delight at solving our puzzles to whoever will listen. Get it right and you can do the “I told you so” thing for the rest of the…. oops, that would be telling.

    Filed under: Featured

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:00
    How to use the Raspberry Pi as a Slow Scan Television (SSTV) camera #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Agri Vision posted this project using their Raspberry Pi as a SSTV camera.

    In this project the Raspberry Pi with the PiCam is used as a wireless camera which can transmit images over long distances, usually tenths of kilometers. Images will be transmitted by amateur radio (ham-radio) using slow scan television (SSTV) on the 2 meter band (144.5 MHz). Since the Pi can generate the HF FM signal itself, no additional electronics are needed for low power transmissions. For a little bit more power a one or two transistor amplifier will be suitable. Furthermore a low pass filter is recommended to filter out higher harmonics of the signal. This project also contains a python script which detects movement. Using this script the Raspberry Pi can be used as a wireless security cam at distances far outside the range of normal WiFi networks. Be aware that you need a ham-radio license to use this application!

    See the full tutorial here.

    NewImage


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:00
    Caleb Kraft joins @make MAKE Magazine as community editor #makerbusiness


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    Caleb Kraft joins MAKE Magazine as community editor via Twitter. Previously – Caleb Kraft formerly of @hackaday was Executive and Chief Community Editor @ EETimes. This is very exciting for the fans of MAKE and Caleb, congrats everyone!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:00
    New Project: Hacking the Lego EV3: Build Your Own Object Sensor “Eyes”

    IMG_0877 (2)Learn this simple hack to start adding your own sensors to the your Mindstorms system.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Homemade Dune Stillsuit Costume #Dune


    dune stillsuit

    The Fremen may have had only one way to make a stillsuit, but in the modern day, we have access to more supplies than they did on Arrakis. Lake fashioned his stillsuit from super glue, a black leotard, rubber latex, black flex tubing, and more. Here are the basics:

    I got together some materials: 1/4″ thick minicell foam, tubes of goop, lots of super glue, 1/4″ black flex tubing, black leotard, rubber latex and black acrylic paint. I borrowed a mannequin from a friend who has a clothing boutique and put the leotard on it. Then I started with all the tubing networking. Once all the tubing was secured I went to work cutting and glueing the foam to the leotard.

    For the puff pockets I rolled the foam into cylinders and glued onto flat foam. Once all the foam was secure I mixed 3/4 latex and 1/4 black acrylic and painted the suit. The leotard was painted with a aerosol black fabric paint. Then I used an old phone ear piece and tubing to make the nostril/ear piece. I topped it off with blue sclera contact lenses and carried a bag of spice around with me at the party.

    via Coolest Handmade Costumes

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Build your own Homemade Sports Ticker with a Raspberry Pi and LED sign! @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi



    Mike Metral‘s tutorial over at Medium.com grew out of his friend’s super-fan media set-up for viewing March Madness. The tutorial shows you how to build your own sports ticker using a raspberry pi and an LED sign!

    Introduction

    I have a good friend named Eric. Eric is the definition of a sports fanatic. His love for sports goes so deep, that he has completely revamped his living room into a mini sports bar equipped with 5 TV’s that are constantly broadcasting a multitude of games across many sports leagues. His knowledge of sports is even more impressive than his setup — we once tested it by having him run through all of the NCAA March Madness champions from memory since 1979 and he only got stumped on 2 of them, earning him the nickname “The Sports Almanac…”

    Technical Introduction

    So the next day, I asked myself “how hard can building a sports ticker really be?” I knew that at the very least I wanted a few key pieces:

    1.“Free” sporting information for the lowest barriers to entry in this project. This was an adventure in of itself best described in a programmatic sports stat blog post.

    2. An LED sign for the novelty of displaying the game information.

    3. And a Raspberry Pi for ultimate portability, minimal occupancy of space in a living room, and bonus brownie points in the homebrew / hacktivist community.

    After perusing Google, I came across an interesting blog: SF Muni LED Sign at Home with Raspberry Pi — Bingo! Just what I was looking for. This blog described how one guy’s need for instant SF Muni information in his home led him to work through the pain points of writing to an LED sign and ultimately, open sourcing his code. There was just one “problem” for me in all of this, his code was all written in Ruby — I’m a Python guy. If you aren’t familiar with this proverbial coding war, feel free to start here.

    Ticker

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 14:00
    Stanstead Abbotts Raspberry Pi Webcam Catches Candids of Local Bird Life



    Hunting around for some interesting Raspberry Pi webcams, I stumbled on this Stanstead Abbotts Raspberry Pi webcam, trained on a bird feeder, that automatically tweets motion activity as @StasteadPi. Sifting through recent photos, I was surprised how much fun some of these bird feeder candids could be. And a few of the shots give me the impression that the birds are onto us….

    See the latest images on Twitter: @StansteadPi.

    Live feed is available 7am-8pm.

    Read More.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:43
    The Future of Making



    The idea of making isn’t just reserved for handmade bikes, artisan pickles, and Arduino helicopters. The future of making is a product of our human needs and the possibilities we create through technology. This is about a larger shift towards making and the unexpected movements that might occur. It’s about how everyone from you to your grandma might design, make and consume products or experiences in the next 10 to 15 years. In this session Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab, and Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, will host a conversation that considers how we might fashion new tools for the future and then how those tools might influence our lives.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:00
    Build a fridge/freezer temperature alarm using your Raspberry Pi! #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


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    mazzmn in the Element 14 community posted this great project that he made and a tutorial showing how to do one yourself!

    I’ve been blogging about my experience in Road Test reviewing the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Bundle. As a part of this Road Test I’m creating a Fridge/Freezer Temperature Alarm system for our local food shelf, Channel 1. You can see where this Road Test started for me here

    Background info:

    Last Christmas vacation, I volunteered for a local food shelf called Channel One. I was chatting with the warehouse manager and he mentioned that their large freezer and cooler rooms are protected by commercial monitoring systems, but he’d really like a temperature monitor for their walk-in display-case cooler and freezer. The food shelf is closed from Friday Noon until Monday at 8am, they’ve had several cases where the unit has blown a fuse and food has been ruined. My goal was to use the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Bundle to build a low cost temperature monitoring system that can send free text messages when the temperature in the fridge or freezer is outside of the acceptable range.

    Project Objective:

    • Monitor the temperature of the Freezer and the Fridge Unit – the valid temperature target is 33F in the fridge unit, and -10F in the freezer unit. However, during business hours, the doors are opened by customers and stocking personnel, so the the fridge could possibly fluctuate to 60F. So allow for a wider temperature range during Business Hours vs Off Hours.
    • Audible temp range alarm. Make some noise when the temperature is out of range.
    • Snooze Alarm – If the temperature range is out of whack, support a button that stops the noise.
    • Text message – when the temperature is out of range, send a text message to someone who can either fix the problem, or move the food.
    • LCD Temperature display -make the unit wall mountable, we’ll mount it outside of the cold of the fridge/freezer unit but the temperature will be visible to staff.

    See the full tutorial here.


    Featured Adafruit Products!

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    Adafruit RGB Positive 16×2 LCD+Keypad Kit for Raspberry Pi: This new Adafruit Pi Plate makes it easy to use an RGB 16×2 Character LCD. We really like the RGB Character LCDs we stock in the shop. (For RGB we have RGB negative and RGB positive.) Unfortunately, these LCDs do require quite a few digital pins, 6 to control the LCD and then another 3 to control the RGB backlight for a total of 9 pins. That’s nearly all the GPIO available on a Pi! Read more.


    NewImage

    Waterproof DS18B20 Digital temperature sensor + extras: This is a pre-wired and waterproofed version of the DS18B20 sensor. Handy for when you need to measure something far away, or in wet conditions. While the sensor is good up to 125°C the cable is jacketed in PVC so we suggest keeping it under 100°C. Because they are digital, you don’t get any signal degradation even over long distances! These 1-wire digital temperature sensors are fairly precise (±0.5°C over much of the range) and can give up to 12 bits of precision from the onboard digital-to-analog converter. They work great with any microcontroller using a single digital pin, and you can even connect multiple ones to the same pin, each one has a unique 64-bit ID burned in at the factory to differentiate them. Usable with 3.0-5.0V systems.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:00
    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: No Tea

    thumb2

    In case you haven’t heard, we’re running a contest on Hackaday Projects for the best Sci-Fi build. We’re a little under two weeks until the deadline for the contest and so far there are a lot of great entries (and lots of great prizes still up for grabs).

    If there’s one thing this contest has taught us, it’s that Hackaday readers have impeccable taste in their choices of books, movies, TV shows, and video games. We were surprised at how many entries there are for Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, a series not generally known for having cool gadgets such as giant mechs, lightsabers, and other impressively awesome stuff. Here’s a roundup of the current HHGTTG submissions for the Sci-Fi contest:

    Doors That Sass

    roundup-robot-doorThe doors in Hitchhiker’s Guide are insufferable self-contented sentient portals programmed by the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation to love their simple lives. Upon everyone opening or closing one of these doors, they thank the person for validating their existence.

    The door in [Jarrett]‘s hackerspace wouldn’t stay closed, so what better way to fix the door than with a robotic door greeter? Actually, it’s just a weight tied to a pulley that keeps the door closed with a little bit of circuitry that plays an .mp3 file when the door moves. Still, self-contented doors. [Goug] is also making one of these self-satisfied doors, but there’s not much in the way of progress.

    Going Up?

    sentient-elevatorThe Happy Vertical People Transporter is HHGTTG’s answer to the common elevator. Like doors, they’re also sentient, but also have ‘defocused temporal perception’ to arrive at a floor before a passenger even realizes they need a lift. [DigiGram] and [Lolla] are working on one of these sentient elevators using a webcam, OpenCV, and some AVR-based electronics.

    Look Out!

    peril-sensitive-glassesThe Joo Janta 200 Super-Chromatic Peril Sensitive Sunglasses allow the user to adapt to danger by blacking out a the first signs of peril. [colabot] and [minimum effective dose] realized you can just buy glasses that can be blacked out electronically in the form of active shutter glasses for a 3D TV. With a few peril sensors, they’re working on finishing up their peril sensitive sunglasses.

    Remember, the Hackaday Projects Sci-Fi contest doesn’t end until April 29th. That leaves you plenty of time to enter your own build. May we suggest a Brownian motion simulation beverage?

     

    Filed under: news

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 12:00
    Setting Up a Killer Audio/Visual System for Your Office using a Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi


    Avpost pointmonitor

    The design blog Betterment has a post about their office set-up design, including how they implemented the Raspberry Pi to install metrics dashboards.

    Want to equip your office with metrics dashboards? We’ve found that Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool for clean visuals that you set up in advance. For instance, at DT we created custom dashboards with Dashing, which we then pointed our Raspberry Pis to. With Dashing we set up how often we want the metrics to refresh, and the Raspberry Pi happily displays the information with crisper visuals than the Chromecast.

    Why else didn’t we use Chromecast to show our dashboards? Well, a major advantage of Raspberry Pi is that it doesn’t need a designated computer in the office to be in charge of displaying the given tab all the time. This way a computer going to sleep or getting shut down doesn’t affect the display. You also don’t need to buy, set up, and power yet another full-on computer.

    What exactly is a Raspberry Pi? It’s a tiny USB-powered computer running Linux. Sure, it’s a slow-as-molasses computer, but it’s pretty cool to use this little device.

    Pro tip: We installed a great app on our Raspberry Pi called Unclutter, which hides that stubborn mouse cursor on the dashboard display.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

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