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  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 15:00
    Well Crafted Bayonetta Costume


    bayonetta cosplay

    Bayonetta 2 isn’t out yet, but that doesn’t stop cosplayers from portraying characters in the game. Lisa Lou Who has developed a wonderful interpretation of the main character (Bayonetta’s) outfit, and it looks like she’s covered every detail available in the images that Platinum Games has released so far. Here’s how she fashioned the guns:

    The guns are made out of PVC piping for the barrels, insulation foam for for handle, craft foam for the details, and practically all covered in worbla to make them sturdier. The shoes are repainted $6 boots from Forever 21– they used to be brown, I think. I guess you get inventive when you start running out of money! I screwed the guns into the shows with 3″ screws, and even E6000-ed them on, just to be sure. The charms on the guns were all the same necklace pendant from Jo-ann’s, I just painted them all different.

    Read more at DeviantArt.

    via Geek x Girls, photo by AndrewDHPhotos.

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 14:50
    First Atomic Clock Wristwatch – The Hewlett Packard 5071A


    Wrist-5071A1
    First Atomic Clock Wristwatch – The Hewlett Packard 5071A :)

    The watch keeps time to a few nanoseconds per day. The attractive display is based on 7-segment red LED technology. Batteries are included (they last about 45 minutes but are rechargeable). AC adapter included. There are no adjustments for daylight saving time; however the clock does handle leap seconds and keeps track of the [Modified Julian] date. This HP wristwatch includes 5/10 MHz and 1 PPS outputs. An internal keypad is used to set the date and time. Not waterproof nor even water resistant. High-performance models available

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 14:28
    Etsy Wholesale #makerbusiness


    Adafruit 2912

    Etsy Wholesale: A New Sales Channel for Growth | Etsy News Blog.

    When the platform officially comes out of beta, new sellers will pay a one-time joining fee of $100 and Etsy will collect a 3.5% transaction fee for wholesale purchase orders. This is consistent with the transaction fees for Etsy.com, keeping profits in the hands of the designer.

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 14:00
    The TI SensorTag—Now with added iBeacon

    The SensorTag is a Bluetooth Low Energy development kit targeted at iOS developers.Texas Instruments announces update to SensorTag, adding iBeacon support.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 14:00
    New Project: Universal Robot Gripper

    vlcsnap-2014-04-10-12h37m35s140bThis gripper takes advantage of "jamming" semi-fluid coffee grounds.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 14:00
    Pebble sold 400K smartwatches in 2013, on track to double


    140225162300-pebble-and-pebble-steel-smart-watch-620xa

    ‘Pebble sold 400,000 smartwatches last year, on track to double revenues in 2014′ on CNN Money:

    This week, Google (GOOG) announced Android Wear, a version of its popular mobile operating system, with launch partners such as Motorola and its Moto 360 watch, due in the summer. When devices like the Moto 360 arrive, they’ll join the massive Android community, one Gartner estimates will have 1 billion users by year’s end.

    “When we started working on wearables six years ago, there were few players in the space and a lot of skeptics,” says Pebble CEO Eric Migicovsky of Google’s news. “It’s exciting to see this market grow so quickly — enabling more interesting use cases and keeping all of us laser-focused on creating the very best user experiences we can.”

    If Migicovsky doesn’t seem nervous, it’s because his startup is off to a solid start. The company has sold over 400,000 Pebble smart watches since January 2013. Back-of-the-envelope math estimates $60 million in revenues for that time frame. According George Zachary, a Charles River Ventures partner and Pebble investor, the company will make twice last year’s revenue in 2014. (No wonder Pebble became profitable in early 2013.) There are now over 1,000 Pebble apps available, with 12,000 registered developers all-but-assuring more are on the way. Brags Zachary: “It’s my fastest-growing company ever.”

    As revenues have ballooned, so has Pebble. The startup employs around 70, up from 45 this January, and just added two new members to management. Jeff Hyman, Apple’s (AAPL) ex-Director of Hardware Engineering and Manufacturing Law, will serve as general counsel. Meanwhile, former Jawbone VP of Finance Marin Tchakarov will act as CFO.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 13:00
    Homemade Gravity Light Doesn’t Last Long but Proves the Concept!

    gravity light

    After being inspired by the Deciwatt Gravity light, [Steve Dufresne] decided he wanted to try making his own as a proof of concept.

    The Gravity Light by Deciwatt is an innovative device designed for third world countries to help eliminate expensive lighting like kerosene lamps. It has a small weight on a pulley which can be lifted up in under 3 seconds. During its slow descent down the weight provides light for 25 minutes! It’s affordable, sustainable, and reliable. It’s also mechanically impressive, which is exactly why [Steve] decided to try making his own.

    He’s using a single LED, a small DC motor, a few pieces of wood, an old bicycle wheel, some bicycle chain, and a few jugs of water. The water is connected to the chain which is looped over the smallest gear on the bike. The generator is then powered by a belt wrapping around the outside of the rim. This gives the motor enough speed to generate electricity for the LED. His current design only lasts for about 3 minutes, but he’s already working on the second iteration. Testing systems like this really give you an appreciation for the effort that must have gone into the real Gravity Light.

    Stick around after the break to see it in action.

    Filed under: misc hacks

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 13:00
    Stitch Parallel Conductive Threads with a Cording Foot #WearableWednesday



    Cynthia’s been on a wearables roll lately! Check out this technique for stitching parallel conductive threads onto a ribbon by using a cording foot (comes with most sewing machines). Hackaday writes:

    This technique could be particularly useful when using addressable LEDs like a NeoPixel to get the ground, data, and positive lined up fairly accurately. Sewing the conductive thread onto ribbon also makes it a hell of a lot easier to attach to many garments or textiles, and also makes it easier to replace or reuse.

    The method is pretty easy, essentially using the grooves in the cording foot to guide the conductive treads and ensuring even spacing. Two of the lines are sewn down approximately 3 mm apart using a zigzag stitch. The third line is sewn separately making sure the stitching doesn’t break the first two lines. In the video, a striped ribbon is used which has slight troughs that additionally helps the threads stay in place and the sewer to stay on target.


    Conductive Thread on the Adafruit Learning System

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 12:00
    Sparkling Chameleon Fur Wrap #WearableWednesday



    richa1 in the Adafruit forums writes:

    This is a variant of the Adafruit Chameleon Scarf that I recently made. I made the color fade and randomly twinkle rather than stay on all the time. I also added a button to restart the color sample sequence as well. To include some motion feedback, I used a Fast Vibration Sensor Switch to increase the number of pixels that go bright when it is triggered.

    This is using 20 NeoPixles and the wires between them are rather long so that they can be spread out over a larger aria. The color sensor and button are also at the end of a long wire so that they could be placed inside of a fabric sheathe for easy color sampling. This is the same with the last NeoPixle in the chain so you can see the other puffball blink before the color is sampled.

    Code on github!

    twinkle_color_change-layout


    Chameleon Scarf

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 10:00
    Sparkly tank top made with Adafruit Neopixels! #WearableWednesday



    @alissadesigns tweeted this vine of her sparkly tank top made with neopixels! Love it!


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    NewImage

    Flora RGB Smart NeoPixel version 2 – Pack of 4: What’s a wearable project without LEDs? Our favorite part of the Flora platform is these tiny smart pixels. Designed specifically for wearables, these updated Flora NeoPixels have ultra-cool technology: these ultra-bright LEDs have a constant-current driver cooked right into the LED package! The pixels are chainable – so you only need 1 pin/wire to control as many LEDs as you like. They’re easy to sew, and the chainable design means no crossed threads. Read more.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 10:00
    Inkjet Transfers to Wood

    Color Image on wood board

    You can’t feed a piece of wood through a stock inkjet printer, and if you could it’s likely the nature of the material would result in less than optimal prints. But [Steve Ramsey] has a tutorial on inkjet transfers to wood over on his YouTube Channel which is a simple two-step method that produces great results. We really love quick tips like this. Steve explains the entire technique while creating an example project – all in under 2 minutes of video. We don’t want to get your hopes up though – this method will only work on porous absorbent surfaces like bare wood, not on PC boards. We’ve featured some great Inject PCB resist methods here in the past though.

    The transfer technique is dead simple. [Steve] uses the backing from a used sheet of inkjet labels (the shiny part that normally gets thrown away). He runs the backing sheet through his inkjet printer. Since plastic coated backing sheet isn’t porous, the ink doesn’t soak in and dry. He then presses the still wet page onto a piece of wood. The wet ink is instantly absorbed into the wood. A lacquer clear coat seals the image in and really make the colors pop. We’d like to see how this method would work with other porous materials, like fabrics (though the ink probably wouldn’t survive the washing machine).

    Click past the break for another example of [Steve's] work, and two videos featuring the technique.

    inktransfer1

    Filed under: misc hacks

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 09:00
    Interview: Philippe “Philo” Hurbain

    sort3r-2Matthew Beckler interviews legendary Lego hacker Philippe "Philo" Hurbain.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 09:00
    Hacking for NASA Noses #WearableWednesday


    Senti8 This weekend I participated in the NASA Spaces Apps Challenge at the main stage in New York with a team of fellow hackers to tackle the challenge of Space Wearables. The idea was to create an outfit or accessory that might be helpful for spaceflight. My team was loaded with people that had either worked with wearables or Arduino, so we were psyched. Astronaut, Doug Wheelock was there, and we made it a point to ambush him before his big Q&A. Besides getting some great pics, we asked, “What is the thing you miss most when you’re in space.  He replied, “Believe it or not, the smell of earth — soil”. He then explained how senses dull in high altitudes, and how you really miss the sensation of smell. That was all we needed to hear; we ran off to our table and started sketching a wearable that would be capable of connecting astronauts with the smells they miss. SentiWork We liked the idea of a wrist band, so we started imagining how it might work. We wanted the choice of different scents at the touch of a button, and we thought Emoji icons would be easy to read for anyone on the International Space Station. We were still working out the issue of how to inject scents into the nose in a zero gravity atmosphere. However, we did finalize one thing — the name of the product was going to be called Senti8, a take on sentient beings and scent. SentiDrawing The first prototype entailed prying some large snaps off of a teen’s white wrist band. We didn’t want anything conductive near the FLORA microcontroller we would use. Then, we added a piece of waterproof NeoPixel strip to use for lights. One of our team members is a wiz with pixel programming, and as I drew the patterns for the movement, she quickly translated them into Arduino speak. Luckily it worked like a charm. In hackathons you usually have about 24 hrs. to complete things, and that includes the pretty marketing stuff like websites, videos etc. Downtime is not an option. SentiProto2 With the LED strip programming complete, another team member worked on creating the Emojis. It took a bit of testing to figure out whether they should be vertical or horizontal and whether they should have a color block behind them to match the LEDs. Finally we settled on the easiest-to-read vertical position, and we left them on a clear background as the LEDs already were busy looking. That left the final frontier — getting scent into the nose. I remembered that Adafruit had some spikes that were 3D printed for one of their projects, but I couldn’t figure out how we could possibly get them late at night. Would you believe one of our team members had a tiny Makerbot at his house? Needless to say, we sent him away with homework. Ecig In the meantime, one of our team members who was handy with biology had decided to take on the vaporizing that would be needed to inject the scent into the nose. She got to work on hacking an e-cigarette, which we all found quite amusing. She added a bit of soil perfume, which she found at Sephora, and actually had it working. Unfortunately, it formed a crack pretty quickly and started leaking. One of the thin wires that held the battery also broke. We attempted to re-solder it, but removing shielding off of wire that is the size of human hair just isn’t a successful endeavor. So, we decided to regroup on that the next morning. The final day was a mad rush as we only had until 2:00 PM. We got everything in place for two bracelets, but the new e-cigarette still broke at the battery connection. We finally just put it in place to show how it would work, as it was just a prototype. The best surprise is that the team member with the 3D printer had managed to create an app so we could make the two bands appear to have connectivity — so one person could send a scent to another person.  With a website, social media and a video in place, we were ready to present. SentiPresent We were one of the last presentations, but we were certainly memorable. We created a great story to explain our product and the crowd loved it. We even handed out small samples of dirt scent to the judges.  One judge said, “I want one!”. After the jitters of presenting were over, we waited for the final results. We all thought we had lost, but what we didn’t realize is that they save the best two teams for last. We ended up being one of those teams, meaning we get to go on to NASA’s Global Challenge. So, make sure you vote for Senti8 in May!


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 08:00
    ‘Wearable Eyes’ make you appear friendly and social even when you’re not @WearableWednesday


    NewImage

    Angelica Lim over at IEEE Spectrum has posted about these funny looking glasses that could help with “emotional labor”. From the story:

    Have you ever had trouble concentrating in the office as people walk by and glance at you? Do you come off as unfriendly or aloof, when you’re really just focusing on your work?

    Dr. Hirotaka Osawa from Tsukuba University, in Japan, has developed a new wearable device to help us with something called “emotional labor.” His idea is that people could adopt cyborg technology to increase the emotional comfort of those around us. In this case, the device is a crazy pair of glasses that display eyeballs on their lenses.

    The device’s virtual eyes naturally follow people and movement, making it appear as though you’re friendly and approachable, even if you’re too busy doing something else or too tired to actually look friendly and approachable.

    “This emotional support reduces a user’s cognitive load for social manners,” Osawa says.

    Check out his whimsical video below, which won the Best Video award at the 2014 ACM/IEEE Human-Robot Interaction Conference last month:

    The device, which Osawa calls AgencyGlass, has several different functions: when you tilt your head back, the animated eyes look upwards to make it look like you’re thinking. If you nod or shake your head, the glasses blink. All of this is performed with a gyroscope and accelerometer to detect head movement, and an external camera to detect faces and motion.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 07:00
    The HellZXchreiber

    HellZXschreiber

    Hellschreiber – German for ‘light pen’ – was developed in the 20s as a way to transmit text in a way that was much more robust than the teletypes of the time. These devices were used to great effect by the Germans in WWII, and later became popular with wire services and was used until the 80s. The fax machine then happened, and no one really cared about Hellschreiber, save for a few plucky amateur radio enthusiasts.

    In the early 90s, a few of these amateur radio enthusiasts realized they could use their personal computers to communicate with this extremely simple protocol that’s also very resilient against interference and weak radio links. [Danjovic] is following in their footsteps by decoding Hellschreiber on an old ZX Spectrum clone.

    [Danjovic] tested his code with the sound sample found in the Hallschreiber wiki article and some text generated by Fldigi. Everything works beautifully, an [Dan] can even change the intensity of the text with the volume control – a very useful feature should the HellZXchreiber ever make it out into the field.

    Source and image files available for all you strange Speccy fans. Everyone else can check out the videos below.

     

     

    Filed under: classic hacks

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 07:00
    Loving the Digital Dresses #WearableWednesday


    3DDress

    If your style is digital, you should visit apexart in NY for some artistic thrills. The current exhibit, Coding the Body, “interrogates the relationship between humans and code”. Filled with large images of robots and thought provoking wearables, it encourages you to experience texture and to examine process. One small display even captures the feet of passersby, reminding us that movement is not only precious, but something that can be captured and digitized. The exhibit was organized by Leah Buechley, of MIT’s High-Low Tech, who has been researching, playing, inventing and encouraging others in the field of crafting  electricity.

    The garment above by Nervous System explores biological connection. From a distance it looks like lace or a beautiful seaweed, but on close examination, it is small interlocking 3D printed bits. Something that suffers in most 3D printed wearables is movement, however, the clever interlocks allow for creases and folds, much like you would find in fabric. Apparently this design is easily changeable in the program to create many looks, whether it be an angled hemline, strapless bodice or larger pattern detail.

    Pattern Dress

    This dress resembles a Pac-Man maze, and was created by Cait and Casey Reas. The print actually shows yes no expressions from a computer. Although this is a dress format, earlier prints were mounted on small squares and helped to illustrate the difference in these expressions depending on the computer. Definitely the perfect little black dress for the computer geek.

    FeltDress

    This felt dress uses interlocking shapes similar  to some foam toys that used to be popular in educational toy stores. This inventive design from Eunsuk Hur includes a wall hanging, which was perplexing at first. However, a visit to Eunsuk’s site shows the idea of “nomadic lifestyle”, with pieces that can be used interchangeably for clothing and environment. It actually seems quite practical, almost like the coats you find nowadays for campers that transform into sleeping bags. This is a wonderful example of laser cut style that is popping up in modern rugs, pillows and even holiday decorations.

    There are other code curiosities in the exhibit, so it’s well worth visiting. You will find yourself looking at all wearables as expressions of the digital world. Then, you are going to want to make your own. Why not start out with some snazzy 3D printed glowing buttons. Check out our tutorial and bring some math into your fashion.

    3d Buttons


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 06:00
    Tailor Truck: Get 3D scanned for a perfectly fitting suit in your neighborhood #WearableWednesday


    NewImage

    It’s easy to see from the images above that a well fitting suit can do wonders for your look. That’s the goal of Arden Reed’s tailor truck- they use 3D scanning to customize a suit to fit your body. After a successful kickstarter campaign, the truck is now fully functional and taking appointments in cities around America. The suits don’t come that cheap but if you’re willing to spend the money they will guarantee that your suit will fit perfectly!

    Why Custom?

    Have you ever browsed a GQ magazine and wondered how these guys can look so effortlessly good?

    On the other hand, have you ever seen a Macy’s catalogue and FELT the department store look?

    These men are wearing the SAME fabric, the SAME patterns and are under the SAME lighting.

    There is no difference in the product.

    EXCEPT ONE.

    Take a closer look.

    Do you notice how the jacket’s shoulders align perfectly with the model? Do you see a slight angle in the waist so that the suit hugs their stomach?

    The Concept:

    We want to bring affordable custom suiting to men everywhere. However, men don’t trust getting their measurements from just anybody.

    To solve this problem we thought about turning our ecommerce store into brick and mortar, but that would mean increasing our costs to the traditional range of a custom suit maker ($1,000+).

    Keeping it out of reach from the customers we want.

    So instead we got creative. We decided to do something that’s never been done. We’re travelling to you.

    We’re building the first mobile tailor truck equipped with a 3D Scanner that will allow us to make you the best dressed man in the room…

    The 3D Scanner is not a gimmick prior to 2012 accuracy was to within 1-2 inches, but now our technology has a +/- range of 5mm. This works.

    The body scan will be overlayed with a CAD design of your suit ensuring a fit like no other.

    Book an appointment here.

    NewImage


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 06:00
    Byte Magazine Volume 06 Number 04 (1981) “Wearables” ….
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 04:00
    Frozen Instruments Played at Swedish Music Festival

    making2

    [Tim Linhart] wanted to do something different for this Swedish music festival — so he decided to carve all the instruments by hand, out of ice.

    The festival consists of seven bands playing very different musical styles, with over 40 concerts occurring during the festival. [Tim Linhart] has painstakingly carved each instrument from violins to cellos out of individual sheets of ice. He adds strings and fret-boards to complete each piece, and if the temperature goes above zero it’s game over. The concerts are held in a building made of ice to make sure this doesn’t happen.

    And since they are built out of layers — he’s also thrown in some RGB LEDs to give the instruments a bit more pizzazz. They actually sound pretty good too!

    [Tim] is kinder to his instruments than [Matz Robert Eriksson] was to his ice drums. For some other unconventional instruments, do you remember our controversial piece on Disarm? Turning guns into a mechanized orchestra! Typewriters make interesting instruments as well.

    [Thanks Joshua!]

    Filed under: musical hacks

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 03:55
    How to Get Girls into EV3 Robotics

    girtractorIs the Lego Mindstorms EV3 set boy-centric? And if so, what can we do about it?

    Read more on MAKE


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