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  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 17:00
    The Zero Gravity Cocktail Project

    Zero Gravity Cocktail Project logoHow do you pour a drink in space?

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 16:01
    Geodesic Structures that aren’t just Domes

    Geodesic structures

    [Brian Korsedal] and his company Arcology Now! have developed a great geodesic building system which makes architectural structures that aren’t just limited to domes. They 3D scan the terrain, generate plans, and make geodesic steel space frame structures which are easy to assemble and can be in any shape imaginable.

    Their clever design software can create any shape and incorporate uneven terrains into the plans. The structures are really easy to construct with basic tools, and assembly is extremely straight forward because the pole labels are generated by the design software. Watch this construction time lapse video.

    At the moment, ordering a structure fabricated by the company is your only option. But it shouldn’t be too hard to fabricate something similar if you have access to a hackerspace. It may even be worth getting in touch with Arcology now! as they do seem happy collaborating to make art like the Amyloid Project, and architectural structures for public spaces and festivals like Lucidity. Find out what they are up to on the Arcology Now! Facebook page.

    Would this be perfect for what you’ve been thinking about building? Let us know what that ‘something’ is in the comments below.

    Filed under: home hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 16:00
    20-year-olds build a device that converts voice input to Braille characters using @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    This innovative project is a device that converts what you say into Braille to help the visually impaired. See it in action around the 2 minute mark. Via YourStory.

    Give an engineer a tool and he will work wonders. This is what happened when Sanskriti Dawle and Aman Srivastav, second year students at BITS Goa, came across Raspberry Pi (a credit card sized computer) during a workshop.

    It didn’t excite them at first. “Typing code to make lights glow, what’s the big deal,” said Sanskriti. However, as Aman continued playing around with the device he saw a lot of possibilities. It was during a random conversation that they came up with the idea of a ‘Braille Dicta-Teacher’, a device to make learning Braille easier for the visually challenged…

    There are over 285 million visually challenged people in the world, and even in a developed country like the US less than 10 percent of the visually challenged people are literate. The scenario in India is much worse. To counter this, Sanskriti and Aman started Project Mudra. They have developed a device which converts voice input to Braille characters using Google’s speech API and hardware using Raspberry Pi.

    The device works in three different modes – Browse mode, Auto mode and Exam mode.

    Browse mode – In the browse mode, user speech input is converted into tactile Braille output. This enables users to speak out the words they want converted into Braille thus learning at their own pace and comfort.

    Auto Mode – The Auto mode runs a predetermined speech sequence and converts it into a tactile output. This is generally suited best for memorization and disciplined learning. It reads through all the English alphabets and numbers sequentially and the Braille output for each of them is generated synchronously along with the audio output.

    Exam Mode – Exam mode tests the user recall based on his ability to guess the correct letter in the Braille interface and gives the answer as speech output. Here a random letter is chosen in Braille script and the user is prompted by the speech input for the respective letter. Then the user’s input is checked against the database and the correct answer is revealed.

    “Learning ABC is the first step to literacy in any language,” says Sanskriti. And this is what they are trying to accomplish for the visually challenged…

    Read more.

    NewImage


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 15:00
    Setting Up Wireless Networking on Your Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi


    Muo raspi wireless dongle close

    This handy tutorial shows you how to set up wireless networking on your raspberry pi, from makeuseof.

    When you first acquire your Raspberry Pi, the best option is to use an Ethernet connection to ensure the operating system is correctly configured and up-to-date. You can then move onto a wireless USB connection once you’re happy.

    The benefit of Ethernet over wireless LAN on the Raspberry Pi – as with most other platforms – is that there is zero configuration required. All you need to do is ensure the cable is connected to a correctly-configured router, plug it into your Pi and boot it up.

    Conversely, setting up wireless LAN on the Raspberry Pi can be tricky. The first thing to do is make sure you have chosen a compatible wireless USB dongle.

    Finding A Compatible Wireless USB Dongle

    There are various way that you might have acquired your Raspberry Pi. You might, for example, have bought it as a standalone unit and purchased the required additional components, a tactic that can prove more expensive than expected but still cheaper than other computers.

    Alternatively, you may have purchased a Raspberry Pi kit, containing the computer, a case, SD card, and other hardware, including the wireless dongle. In this case, you should be confident that the dongle will be compatible with the computer.

    Many early buyers of the Raspberry Pi didn’t have the option of a dedicated Wi-Fi dongle, and had to rely on trial and error. This is how the list of compatible hardware was created at elinux.org, which includes a section on wireless USB dongles.

    For the best results, you should get your hands on the USB Wi-Fi adaptor distributed through The Pi Hut. This is a Wireless N device that will also work on other platforms (Windows, other Linux distros, Mac OS X) and is available for around $10 plus shipping.

    This is the most common Wi-Fi adaptor in use for the Raspberry Pi, and is the one used to outline the process of configuring your WLAN connection below. Note that the following steps are intended for Raspbian users – the general process should be largely the same on your chosen Raspberry Pi distro, however.

    Configuring The WLAN Connection

    Start by connecting your USB Wi-Fi adaptor to your Raspberry Pi, ensuring the Ethernet cable is also connected. Check your SD card is secure and connect to your power supply.

    You’ll need to ensure your version of Raspbian is fully updated, so after you log on, enter:

    sudo apt-get update

    Alternatively, you can launch into the GUI (enter startx)> and enter the same command in LXTerminal.

    Next, check that the USB dongle is detected by your minicomputer – enter lsusb and check the results. The Wi-Fi device should be listed

    Muo raspberrypi commands lusb

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 15:00
    Make Moving Dragon Wings



    Have about $20? Then you can make a set of dragon wings with this tutorial from gryphern. The movements are controlled by body posture, and the wings are very lightweight. Materials to make the wings include a PVC skeleton, trash bags or a shower curtain, and other everyday objects. Even though the wings are fashioned from simple supplies, they’re durable. The video goes over the process in detail and has a demonstration – and a link to a downloadable diagram. Here’s the beginning of the tutorial:

    So first, design your wing and choose what material you want for the membrane. I decided on fabric when I saw this shimmery stuff, so I bought it off the bolt at the JoAnn Fabric store.

    Spread out your membrane material, that’s what will limit the size and shape of your wing. Then, cut the high temp PVC pipe into two pieces to match your design, it’ll be the long, moving part of the wing. The reason I’m using high temp pipe is that it’s thin and springy, it’s no wider that a Euro cent (Props to my EU viewers, yo!) I cut it at an angle so it would look cooler. It can be cut with a hand saw or a cable saw (which is wire cable with handles.)

    Read more and get downloads at gryphern’s site.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 14:09
    Your Own Satellite: 7 Things to Know Before You Go

    Low earth orbit view of an aurora (image ISS006E18372, courtesy of NASA)Launching your own satellite is an excellent decision, and easier than you may think. But first, what do you want your satellite to do? Here are 7 key things you need to know before you launch your personal spacecraft into orbit at 17,000 miles an hour.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 14:00
    Dial-A-Song Builds Voicemail Music Box into Old Phone #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    Dial A Song

    Adam Haile wrote in to share about his Dial-A-Song project — in order to create a matrix keypad Raspberry Pi interface he had to write a new library around interrupts instead of polling (here!) that he wanted to share. “I’m using an old phone keypad here but it works great with your membrane 3×4 keypad equally as well.”

    Here are a few details from his ongoing Dial-A-Song Voicemail Musicbox Project:

    Much of the inspiration came from They Might Be Giants, who used to leave recordings of their songs on their answering machine, which could be listened to by calling (718) 387-6962. So, I wanted to combine a little of that with a phone tree menu to give the feel of calling in to a phone service to listen to music of your choice. Yes, it’s a little ridiculous, but why else would I be building it.

    As a way of documenting the project and an extra push to keep working on it, I’m going to be writing up a build log in several parts as the build progresses.

    …The first thing to do was remove the short ribbon cable that came on the keypad and replace it with something a little longer so I could more easily hook it up to the Pi.

    …It’s super simple to use as you can see from the code below. Instantiate the class with a callback function and that function gets called when there’s a keypress on the pad. Just note that the callback will be running on the context of a different thread from the main thread. While it uses interrupts, RPi.GPIO cheats a little bit and the interrupts are actually running on background threads and so will the callback. Not usually a big problem but something to be aware of.

    You can grab the full library and find any updates to it on GitHub.

    Read More.

    Dial a song

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 13:00
    How to change the Raspberry Pi password #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    RaspberryPi Spy posted this useful video on how to change your Raspberry Pi password.

    The default Raspbian SD card image configures a default user account called ‘pi’ with a password of ‘raspberry’. Every device using this image will therefore have the same username and password combination. This is great for quickly getting starting but isn’t very good practice from a security point of view.

    You should therefore consider changing the default password as soon as possible. It’s easy to do and only takes a minute. Here are the simple steps you need to follow :

    1. From a command line prompt type passwd followed by the Enter key.
    2. Enter the current password followed by the Enter key.
    3. Enter the new password followed by the Enter key.
    4. Re-enter the new password followed by the Enter key.
    5. Your password has now been changed.

    Your screen will look something like the screenshot below:

    NewImage

    Changing your default password is important if your Raspberry Pi is connected to the Internet. SSH is enabled by default in the Raspbian image and this makes it vulnerable to hackers. Change your password and stay secure!

    … oh just make sure you don’t forget the new password!

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 13:00
    BeagleBone Black and FPGA Driven LED Wall

    LED Wall

     

    This is 6,144 RGB LEDs being controlled by a BeagleBone Black and a FPGA. This gives the display 12 bit color and a refresh rate of 200 Hz. [Glen]‘s 6 panel LED wall uses the BeagleBone Black to generate the image, and the LogiBone FPGA board for high speed IO.

    [Glen] started off with a single 32 x 32 RGB LED panel, and wrote a detailed tutorial on how that build works. The LED panels used for this project have built in drivers, but they cannot do PWM. To control color, the entire panel must be updated at high speed.

    The BeagleBone’s IO isn’t fast enough for this, so a Xilinx Spartan 6 LX9 FPGA takes care of the high speed signaling. The image is loaded into the FPGA’s Block RAM by the BeagleBone, and the FPGA takes care of the rest. The LogiBone maps the FPGA’s address space into the CPU’s address space, which allows for high speed transfers.

    If you want to drive this many LEDs, you’ll need to look beyond the Arduino. [Glen]‘s work provides a great starting point, and all of the source is available on Github.

    [Thanks to Jonathan for the tip]

    Filed under: led hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 12:00
    5 Pointers To Supercharge Your Raspberry Pi Projects @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi


    5pointers

    These five Pi techniques will help elevate you out of the beginner stages, from readwrite.

    However, there’s a steep jump-off point between the basics and the intermediate stuff. When you move from “setting up your Pi” tutorials to stuff like “building a media server,” the pre-project requirements start to get a little dicey. Many intermediate Pi tutorials, including some of the ones here on ReadWrite, assume a few things about your Raspberry Pi setup.

    Not every project will require all of the techniques suggested here, but knowing these procedures will make projects that do require them go much more smoothly later.

    When you’re ready to go beyond the basics, here are some things you can do to prepare your Raspberry Pi for any pre-requirements that a tutorial could throw at you.

    1) Using SSH

    SSH, which stands for Secure Shell, is a cryptographic network protocol that lets you securely transfer data between your computer and your Raspberry Pi. Projects might require it so you can control your Raspberry Pi from your computer’s command line without hooking it up to a monitor or keyboard.

    SSH now comes pre-installed in Raspberry Pi operating system Raspbian, so if you have installed the latest or close-to-latest version of NOOBS, you already have it.

    To use SSH, first you need your Pi’s IP address. Boot your Pi to the command line and type:

    sudo ifconfig

    Three paragraphs will appear. Your IP address will show up in either the first or the third line, depending on whether your Raspberry Pi is hooked up to an ethernet cable or via a wifi adaptor. If it’s ethernet, look in the first paragraph, which starts with “eth0.” If it’s wifi, look in the third paragraph, which starts with “wlan0.”

    Either way, you’ll see the words “inet addr” followed by an IP—something like 192.168.2.2, a pretty common default IP address that we’ll use for the duration of this article.

    Now you have the address that’ll allow you to access the Pi from your computer. If you’re on a Mac, you already have built-in SSH. Launch the Terminal application and type:

    ssh pi@192.168.2.2

    It’ll ask for your password. By default, this is always “raspberry.” If you’ve changed it to something else, use that instead. Now, you’re in!

    If you’re on a PC, there’s an extra step…

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 11:00
    12×32 LED Welcome to Class Bytes Raspberry Pi Demo #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    .

    12×32 LED Welcome to Class Bytes Raspberry Pi Demo:

    Worked on a 16×32 LED matrix from Adafruit.

    I am hoping to have a few demos ready for an upcoming event showing off the abilities of the Raspberry Pi at the Pflugerville Library.

    This is one of the demos – enjoy

    Read More.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 10:00
    Raspberry Pi’s Eben Upton: How we’re turning everyone into DIY hackers #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    NewImage

    The folks over at readwrite had the chance to talk to Raspberry Pi’s cofounder Eben Upton about the Raspberry Pi foundation, DIY hacking, programming, and more. Check out the full interview here.

    ReadWrite: What got you really interested in technology in the first place? How did that lead you eventually to the Raspberry Pi project?

    Eben Upton: So I actually got started when I was a kid. I have a father who has a certain amount of interest in engineering. He’s not an engineer, he’s an English academic. There were always piles of electrical stuff around the house that I used to play with before I understood what it did. Little things like making a light to have by your bed so you could read after “lights out” and stuff.

    And then I got a computer. In the UK we have these machines called BBC Microcomputers, which were 8-bit micros that were build for education. We had them at school, I got into programming at school, and I enjoyed it.

    These things weren’t necessarily in school for programming, or at least they didn’t tend to get used for programming. They would get used to run educational software. But I used to program on them. And then I bought one to program at home. I mean, the day I got my BBC micro, I went in my room, turned it on, and never came out again. [Laughs]

    Programming is amazing for a kid. When you’re a kid you don’t have a lot of power. You don’t have a lot of agency, a lot of control over the world around you. The great thing about programming is it’s a little world where you do whatever you want. And I certainly found that very compelling.

    I’d always been interested in science, math, kind of hard science subjects. Did a lot of computing, did a lot of programming on my BBC. I had a Commodore Amiga after that.

    At university I did a mixture of physics, engineering, and computer science. And then that really kind of led me to the Pi. Because after I’d been at university for a decade [while getting a doctorate], I realized that the kids who were arriving hadn’t had the chance to have that set of experiences as a child. You could still get Legos but … that ladder.

    We’d kind of pulled the ladder up after us. We built these very sophisticated and user-friendly computers for children to use now. Or not even computers—game consoles and phones and tablets, kind of appliances. But people were being denied that opportunity to tinker. So really Raspberry Pi is an attempt to get back—without kind of being too retro—some of what we kind of feel was lost from the evolution of computers over the last 25 years.

    NewImage

    RW: Tell me about inventing the Raspberry Pi.

    EU: We tried building some units based on what you’d call microcontroller technology. I don’t know if you’ve come across an [open source electronics prototyping] platform called Arduino? Sort of a similar level of performance to the Arduino. The nice thing about those chips is they’re very available, they’re commodity parts, they’re very cheap and easy to get ahold of.

    So we tried that. And we ended up with something which was technically a computer—you plug it into your television and stuff. But it was kind of primitive and it was clear that kids weren’t going to engage with it. So that was prototype one, and that prototype is coming to a museum in Ireland in an exhibition called “Fail.” [Laughs] I’m going to go see it next month. It’s in a glass cabinet as an example of a glorious failure.

    The nice thing about that was that was hand built. You can’t really build a modern Raspberry Pi by hand. But this one was primitive enough that you could actually solder it together and I soldered it together in a week. And it was a nice little toy.

    After I’d been at university for a decade of so, I went to work for a company called Broadcom, which is based in southern California but has a big office in Cambridge. They make cellphone chips. And we realized that cell phone chips are quite a good fit. They’re quite a good platform for building a Pi-like device, since they have a lot of graphics performance.

    I built a prototype based on that, based on a Broadcom dev kit. And that was much more powerful, much more capable, again at the same price point. But the challenge we had with that was that it was really a custom environment. It wasn’t a standards based platform.

    We were writing our own SD card drivers, our own file system, our own text editor. You find yourself doing a lot of basic work and although you end up with a platform which is powerful and programmable, it’s completely nonstandard [and] completely unlike any other machine. You don’t get to leverage any of the work that’s already been done by people on desktop platforms. That was prototype two.

    The real breakthrough for us was with prototype three. We got hold of another chip from Broadcom which had an ARM processor which was able to run standard Linux. That was really the point where we realized we had something that met all our goals. And that was the product we went to market with.

    NewImage

    RW: What does that say to you about the potential demand for DIY projects like the Pi? Are we all going to be DIY hackers one day?

    EU: Yeah, I mean, that’s the thing. There is an enormous demand for it. And I think that there is a tie to the maker community. The maker community is much more developed in American than it is in the UK. We do have maker fairs and hackerspaces now, but it’s probably five years behind where it is in the U.S.

    So one thing we found when we started talking about Raspberry Pi, when it started getting international attention, we found we were launching into this very well established community of people who like doing all sorts of DIY activity: knitting, or, you know, woodworking.

    So that’s one of the things that led to that surprise increase in volume for the Pi. Makers who see it as a component they can use to build their projects. Which is great!

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 10:00
    A Brilliant and Elegant CNC Pendant

    pendant

    [Mike Douglas] has a small hobby CNC router, which works great — but you’re limited to controlling it from your PC. And unfortunately, there just aren’t pendants made for this consumer level stuff. Annoyed at having to reach over to use his keyboard all the time, he stumbled upon a simple, but brilliant solution: A dedicated USB 10-key pendant keypad.

    These USB keypads are designed for laptops that don’t have full size keyboards. They can be had for a few dollars from China, and let you expand your keyboard possibilities… All [Mike] had to do was print off some stickers to put on the keys!

    It’s easy to program new hot keys in Mach3  – and there you go! Why haven’t we thought of this before? While you’re at it, why not build a cyclonic dust separator for your CNC too — and if you’re having trouble clamping down work pieces, [Mike] has a pretty cool solution for that as well.

     

     

    Filed under: cnc hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 09:00
    How to set up your Raspberry Pi camera module #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_pi



    The blog average man vs raspberry pi has a great post about setting up your Raspberry Pi’s camera module.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, I recently purchased a Raspberry Pi camera module to open up a whole new bag of Raspberry learning opportunities and potentially take some great videos as well.

    Before I jump into the code and start to take time-lapse videos of various pointless things, I thought it would be worthwhile to share some steps on of how to connect your camera module to your Pi, including a few things to look out for. This will be ‘Part 1′ of a series of camera module posts. Let’s begin…

    Read the full tutorial here.

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 08:00
    Meet Jasper: Open-Source Voice Computing for your Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    Jasper, a customizable, open-source platform for developing voice-controlled applications for the Raspberry Pi, is basically Siri’s super cool cousin, via Raspberrypi.org. Jasper’s developers are Charlie Marsh & Shubhro Saha, two BSE students at Princeton University.

    Jasper already comes with modules to deal with things like time, weather, Gmail, playing your Spotify music, news (and what’s on Hacker News)…and knock knock jokes. You can build your own modules to add more functionality. We’re really impressed by how well-documented Jasper is; new developers should be able to get to grips with building on the platform very easily, and we’re looking forward to watching what you guys get up to with it.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 07:01
    The INFRA-NINJA — A PC Remote Receiver

    F3GULGEHTOUJI73.MEDIUM

    Laziness sometimes spawns the greatest inventions. Making things to reduce effort on your part is quite possibly one of the greatest motivators out there. So when [Kyle] had to get out of bed in order to turn off Netflix on his computer… He decided to do something about it.

    He already had an Apple remote, which we have to admit, is a nice, simple and elegant control stick — so he decided  to interface with it in order to control his non-Apple computer. He quickly made up a simple PCB up using the good ‘ol toner transfer method, and then populated it with a Bareduino, a CP2102 USB 2.0 to TTL UART 6PIN Serial Converter, an IR receiver, a USB jack, header pins, and a few LED and tactile switches.

    It’s a bit tricky to upload the code (you have to remove the jumper block) but then it’s just a matter of connecting to it and transferring it over with the Arduino IDE. The Instructable is a bit short, but [Kyle] promises if you’re really interested he’ll help out with any questions you might have!

    Filed under: computer hacks, macs hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 07:00
    Animated Setting up your Raspberry Pi (VIDEO) #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Animated Setting up your Raspberry Pi (VIDEO)

    How to set up your Raspberry Pi – animation by Saladhouse, voiced by Johnny Ball – for the Raspberry Pi Foundation

    And here’s a quick shout from Liz @ Raspberry Pi Foundation about the voice talent, who has been making learning about science, technology, and mathematics cool in the UK since the 1970s!

    That’s the LEGENDARY Johnny Ball. Johnny donated his time and his voice talent to the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and we couldn’t be more grateful: Johnny, please watch out for the postman next week, ‘cos we’re sending you a present to say thanks.

    Read More.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 06:00
    How to change the command line font size on your pi! #piday #raspberrypi @raspberry_pi



    Raspberry Pi Spy has a useful tutorial for changing the command line font size on your Raspberry Pi.

    If you are using your Raspberry Pi with a smaller screen you may want to change the font used on the command line to make it easier to read. I usually do this when I am using various portable LCD screens (eg the HDMIPi).

    It only changes the font within the console if you are using a screen connected directly to the Pi. It won’t affect Putty/SSH sessions.

    Changing the font size on the console is easy to do and there are two methods you can choose.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 04:01
    Never Lose Your Pencil With OSkAR on Patrol

    OSkAR

    [Courtney] has been hard at work on OSkAR, an OpenCV based speaking robot. OSkAR is [Courney's] capstone project (pdf link) at Shepherd University in West Virginia, USA. The goal is for OSkAR to be an assistive robot. OSkAR will navigate a typical home environment, reporting objects it finds through speech synthesis software.

    To accomplish this, [Courtney]  started with a Beagle Bone Black and a Logitech C920 webcam. The robot’s body was built using LEGO Mindstorms NXT parts. This means that when not operating autonomously, OSkAR can be controlled via Bluetooth from an Android phone. On the software side, [Courtney] began with the stock Angstrom Linux distribution for the BBB. After running into video problems, she switched her desktop environment to Xfce.  OpenCV provides the machine vision system. [Courtney] created models for several objects for OSkAR to recognize.

    Right now, OSkAR’s life consists of wandering around the room looking for pencils and door frames. When a pencil or door is found, OSkAR announces the object, and whether it is to his left or his right. It may sound like a rather boring life for a robot, but the semester isn’t over yet. [Courtney] is still hard at work creating more object models, which will expand OSkAR’s interests into new areas.

    [Thanks Emad!]

    Filed under: robots hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 03:55
    New Project: Toy Inventor’s Notebook: Stairwell Spray Booth

    sprayboothWhat's under your stairway?

    Read more on MAKE


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