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  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 01:28
    Pro Snowboarder Mike Basich’s Off-Grid DIY Home in the Sierras

    area 241 summer shotBasich's property is 40 acres of rough mountain terrain with a 228-square-feet off-grid cabin hand-built out of granite and pine harvested from the property.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 01:01
    3D Printed Cyclone Dust Separator

    DSCN7011

    [Nicholas] has been reading Hackaday for a few months now, and after seeing several people’s dust extractor setups, he decided to make his own 3D printed version. And he’s sharing the files with everyone!

    He has a small Lobo mill which produces a lot of dust and to clean up he’s been using a small “Shark” brand vacuum cleaner. It’s a powerful little thing, but has little to no capacity which makes it rather frustrating to use. This makes it a perfect candidate for a cyclone upgrade! If you’re not familiar with cyclonic separator it’s a way of removing dust from air using vortex separation — between rotational forces and gravity, this keeps the dust out of your vacuum cleaner and means you never need to change another filter!

    Using Autodesk inventor he designed this 4-stage cyclone separator. It’s made for a 1.75″ OD vacuum hose (the Shark standard) but could be easily modified for different vacuums. We’ve seen lots of cyclone separators before, but this 3D printed one certainly makes it easier to fabricate to exacting standards!

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, tool hacks

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 - 00:02
    Collin’s Lab: Soldering



    It’s sad to think of all the awesome things that won’t be built because some folks are turned off by the idea of soldering. Such missed opportunity! Soldering is the fun!

    In an effort to demystify, clarify & familiarize, we bring you the above internet video. Please share it with someone who thinks soldering is “not for them” and to gether we can make the world a better place – filled with blinking circuitry!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:49
    Developed on Hackaday: 2 Days Left to Submit your Design!

    We’re sure that many of Hackaday readers already know that one of the two main components of the Mooltipass project is a smart card, containing (among others) the AES-256 encryption key. Two weeks ago we asked if you’d be interested coming up with a design that will be printed on the final card. As usual, many people were eager to contribute and recently sent us a few suggestions. If you missed the call and would like to join in, it’s not too late! You may still send your CMYK vector image at mathieu[at]hackaday[dot]com by sunday. More detailed specifications may be found here.

    In a few days we’ll also publish on Hackaday a project update, as we recently received the top and bottom PCBs for Olivier’s design. The low level libraries will soon be finished and hopefully a few days later we’ll be able to ship a few devices to developers and beta testers. We’re also still looking for contributors that may be interested in helping us to develop browser plugins.

    The Mooltipass team would also like to thank our dear readers that gave us a skull on Hackaday projects!

    Filed under: Hackaday Columns, hardware

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:30
    Open Printable Prosthetics R&D Resources #maketheworld #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Open prosthetics

    It is deeply heartwarming to check in on the progress at e-NABLE and other open printable prosthetics project teams since the MakeTheWorld: Prosthetics Hangout Series wrapped up at the end of October. Many of those featured during that series are still actively pushing this research forward, and at quite a clip!

    MakerBlock is one of the desktop 3D printing superstars who has taken up this cause. He has documented and shared a number of significant resources to catch you up to date on the collective volunteer R&D efforts so far. Here’s a resource he shared from those involved in university research into this topic:

    Marc Petrykowski of Creighton University was kind enough to provide some additional practical experience and information about the university’s research study into printable prosthetics.  For anyone looking to dive into this project, I’m cross-posting the information from the e-NABLE Google Plus group here.1 I’ve adjusted the formatting slightly, but otherwise everything below are Marc’s words.

    What exact measurements do you need (e.g., hand-length from where to where?)

    Below are photos of all of the measurements I use for designing a hand.2 Yes it does seem like a lot, but all of them are needed to ensure the best custom fit for the hand we make for the user. When making a custom hand, it is important to make the 3D printed hand as similar to the non effect hand (fingers, width, length, etc). Each hand also has to be custom because of the size (length, width, height) or the stump. Some are very tiny and some are much bigger, so that also plays a big role when you have to design a hand. There are two photos that are measuring angle of flexion and extension. Those are important to see how tight or how loose the hand has to be for the power and strength of the individual and to make the hand as functional as possible.

    How do you get them from scans etc.

    Scans from our 3D scanner are in the format .STL which can be imported into programs such as blender (Shown below). Then I can lay it into the preexisting hand design and see an image of how it will fit, including the gauntlet size. If there are further changes to be made, I can do it all in blender before the print.

    How do you apply those measurements to your model

    1. As stated above, the measurements matter for the size of the hand. You can’t have a hand that is much smaller then the opposite hand, but you also can’t have a hand that is too small or large for the stump. Everything has to be customize depending on each case. This is where the designing takes the longest. My goal as the designer and printer is to make the hand as near perfect as the other hand so it feels the same to the body and brain, thus they will respond with the effected hand like it was their real non effected hand. Also as stated above, the degrees of flexion and extension and the size/length of the fingers are all incorporated into the final design before the printing the hand.
    2. And if, as +Jorge Zuniga suggests, ALL parts can be pre-printed, I’m hoping you guys will take the lead in helping us make it easy.  (As easy as buying shoes at a shoe store)
    3. This is possible because all of the redesigning and redoing of the measurements are all done in blender. Remember, if you resize a finger to a certain percentage, then you have to do the same for the rest of the fingers, thumb, phalanges, palm, and the gauntlet. That is how you can print everything off as one complete print.

    Visit Makerblock’s complete post for the rest of the FAQ as well as other great resources!

    OpenPrintedProsthetics


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:26
    Migrate Arduino Code to C Code on New Microcontroller / Adafruit Jobs Board


    Arduino

    Migrate Arduino Code to C Code on New Microcontroller / Adafruit Jobs Board

    JoyLabz is looking for a computer engineer to transition Arduino code written for the ATmega32u4 to an cheaper, shorter lead time microcontroller. This is essentially a re-engineering of the Makey Makey (makeymakey.com) circuit board to a new MCU.

    Hardware:

    Select a new chip meeting the technical and business requirements for the project (5V, 20 to 22 digital i/o, USB HID, comparable power) such as Silicon Labs C8051F38x or Cypress CY8C32.

    The chip should be widely available and cost less than ATMega32u4 in bulk. The chip should have built in USB HID support and the vendor should allow registration of a PID under their VID.

    Software:

    Reimplement the existing Arduino C code (approx 750 lines) on the new MCU. This will include implementation of some Arduino libraries (see code link) if necessary.

    Add one new feature for key remapping (it’s a hack!) (estimated 200 lines code)

    Candidate:

    The eligible candidate should be an expert with writing software on 8-bit MCUs in Arduino and C.

    Show previous experience with writing on the selected platform or similar capability.

    Timeline goal is 1 month. Please submit a resume or website detailing your experience with similar projects and your rate for consideration.

    Learn More

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 23:00
    Steampunk Gunslinger Spawn Costume


    steampunk gunslinger spawn

    One of the wonderful things about comic books is that there about a million characters to pull costume inspiration from. Maybe a bajillion. RPF user madprops focused his efforts on building a steampunk version of Gunslinger Spawn. He used a lot of leather, cast skulls and spikes, and incorporated LEDs to for extra flair. Here’s what he did for the coat:

    Moving on to the coat. The base of the coat was a black Wilson’s leather trench coat I found at Goodwill for $25. Great find! The rest of the coat was hand stitched and tooled. I had to use a vinyl spry paint from DuPont and Nulife to get the red colors. I used a 1/8″ thick x 1/4″ wide aluminum bar in the collar sandwiched between 2 pieces of leather to get the shape in the collar. Hand stitching the coat was a heck of a task. Took me close to 3 weeks just to put all that together.

    steampunk gunslinger spawn 2

    Read more at The RPF.

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 22:26
    Mars Rover Art Car: Bringing Space to the Playa

    roverHow a Burning Man crew brought space to the Playa.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 22:06
    tiny bubbles #macro #led by @CollinMel





    Coming soon :)

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 22:00
    Recovering Nichrome Wire from Unexpected Sources

    115b-guitar-hero

    Don’t you hate it when you’re in a pinch and all your favorite surplus or electronic stores are closed? You’ve gotta finish this project, but how? He’s a nice real hack for you guys.  How to recover nichrome wire from a ceramic heater!

    Necessity spawned this idea, as [Armilar] needed to make 45 cuts in two pieces of foam in order to ship some long circuit boards. Not wanting to make the 90 cuts individually, he improvised this nichrome slicing jig. Not having a spool of nichrome handy, he decided to use a less conventional method. He pulled out a sledgehammer and smashed open a ceramic wirewound resistor.

    According to him, nice big ceramic resistors like this 10W one have about a meter of nichrome wire inside!  After breaking the ceramic, it’s quite easy to remove. He made up a jig using nylon spacers and rivets, and then wrapped his wire back and forth across the whole length. It worked perfectly — though he was using 240VDC @ about 1.2A…

    If you don’t need such a complex setup, there’s always the bare bones wire foam cutters we’ve featured many times before.

    Filed under: classic hacks, tool hacks

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 21:08
    DiResta: Reupholstered Love Seat

    PastedGraphic-2Jimmy DiResta reupholsters a trashed love seat.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 20:51
    DIY FLIR Light Painting – Heat Map Photography #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    A real working ray gun!

    Make a low-budget, FLIR camera for scientific analysis, or just some awesome cosplay. In this project we’ll use a temperature sensor to change the color of a NeoPixel ring to create heat map photography. This cyber-tronic looking sensor measures remote infrared light making it a contact-less temperature sensor. This 3D Printed project comes in two different styles. A neoblaster make a practical ray gun and a ergomonical handle resembles a magnifying glass.

    Check out the full tutorial on the Adafruit Learning System for the arduino sketch and a circuit diagram.

    Heat Map Light Painting Photography
    Heat Map Light Painting Ray Gun


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 20:00
    uformit – Parametric Design Publishing Permits Users to Customize Designs Before Results Are Printed #3DPMarketplace #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Uformit

    A few more products beyond the Joshua Harker mask have been added to uformit. Here is a market place that offers designs that can be tweaked before by customers before they are 3D printed. Uformit:

    The uformit concept has been a long time in the making. A few of the founders of Uformia put together an early implementation in 2005, well before the commercial entity was established. However they decided that laser focus was needed on the development of the geometric kernel and software tools built on top of that in order to make a concept like uformit possible in the future. From that point on, Uformia kept an eye out to find the right enthusiasts to help spearhead the implementation of such a concept.

    …uformit is excited to take personalized designs to an entirely new level by giving the designers all the control in deciding which elements of their design should be exposed to their customers. Customers may not know it, but they are actually 3D modeling when they are changing the parameters on uformit. The simple to use interface merely hides all the complexity of 3D modeling systems, but as Uformia’s geometric kernel is fully available on the backend, this provides for endless options of parameterization for each design.

    uformit will always be the place to come to find high quality, unique designs which can be personalized. In the future, uformit’s ecosystem will expand to allow anyone with a user account, to be able to upload their designs, and share, trade and even participate in the curation process of deciding what designs should be sold on uformit….

    Self Portrait Mask

    This unique decorative mask from renowned artist Joshua Harker combines one of his filigree patterns with his actual biometric face data. Add your own 3D face scan to personalize the mask and blur the relationship between viewer and artist – making it the ultimate modern day self portrait.

    Read More.

    Uformit

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 19:55
    MakerBot Stories | Engineers of Smart Toys Hack Hardware

    Five years ago, Ian Bernstein was working at a robotics company and dreaming of controlling robots with his smartphone. “Back in 2009, nobody was doing it,” says Bernstein, a cofounder and CTO of Orbotix, a Boulder, CO, company that makes connected toys. The Sphero is a versatile robotic ball that can be used as anything from a tool to teach children programming to a ball in a game of miniature golf.

    “When we started Orbotix, I was building all the Sphero prototypes with paper clips and brass and stuff like that, and you can only go so far,” Bernstein said. “Having the MakerBot and being able to make more advanced parts, we’re doing bigger and better things now.”

    The next big thing from Orbotix is a cylinder with wheels that’s a Sphero crossbred with a remote control car. Originally known as the Sphero 2B, it’s now called Ollie.

    Bernstein made the breakthrough prototype of an Ollie on a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer. He printed the wheels in green PLA and other parts in purple, so he dubbed his prototype The Joker. Late one night at the Orbotix office, The Joker hit a jump and flew through the air, clearing four stacked Sphero boxes. The moment was captured on video, and that’s when everyone knew that they had something special in Ollie, Bernstein says.

    “We're doing bigger and better things now.” – Ian Bernstein, cofounder, Orbotix

    Hacking is essential to Orbotix’s company culture, and having 3D printers (back to a MakerBot Thing-O-Matic) allows employees to play around with hardware too. “Hack Fridays” are reserved for experimenting with new ideas. Also, Bernstein says, “Meetings have gone from a lot of arguing to, ‘OK, cool idea. Make it!’” Orbotix now has two MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printers in Boulder and another at their outpost in China.

    If you can’t wait for Ollie to launch this fall, watch the video for a preview. And Orbotix offers a free ramp for your Sphero on Thingiverse.

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 19:30
    Foodini By Natural Machines – 3D Food Printing From Natural Food, Not Specialty Feedstock #3DxKitchen #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    FoodiniUpdates

    We covered the re-launch of Natural Machines with the Foodini back in December, but as they have dived into crowdfunding activities and have been giving talks on the conference circuit including Inside 3D Printing New York last week (see the 3:15pm session!), they have been generating more media to suggest the ways they imagine that a paste-extruder 3D printer variant. The way the Foodini functions is by using pressure to dispense food gel/paste — created on the spot from actual food, by their recommendation. Quite a different approach to the problem from machines working with speciality edible print materials such as the tasty Sugar Labs projects with 3D Systems or the ChocEdge chocolate typography printer from the UK.

    While this is not yet a consumer product, watching Natural Machines and the others competing in this space is a fascinating chance to consider what the consumer food printing applications might be! And check out the recipes they continue to add!

    REAL FOOD. 3D PRINTED.

    Foodini helps create savory or sweet cuisine. The food is real food, made from fresh ingredients prepared before printing. Promoting cooking with fresh ingredients, Foodini manages the difficult and time-consuming parts of food preparation that often discourage people from creating homemade food.

    Read More.

    Designed for Healthy Eating Foodini a 3D Food Printer by Natural Machines Kickstarter

    Natural Machines


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 19:01
    Fail of the Week: Rewiring Robosapien

    fotw-rewiring-robosapien

    Our first thought was “check out all of those TO-92 components!”, but then we saw the wiring nightmare. [Tom] picked up a Robosapien from an estate sale for just $10. Most hackers couldn’t resist that opportunity, but the inexpensive acquisition led to a time-consuming repair odyssey. When something doesn’t work at all you crack it open to see what’s wrong. He was greeted with wiring whose insulation was flaking off.

    This is no problem for anyone competent with a soldering iron. So [Tom] set to work clipping all the bad wire and replacing it with in-line splices. Voila, the little guy was dancing to his own tunes once again! But the success was short-lived as the next day the robot was unresponsive again. [Tom] plans to do some more work by completely replacing the wires as soon as he receives the replacement connectors he ordered. So what do you think, is this an issue that will be resolved with a wire-ectomy or might there be actual damage to the board itself?


    2013-09-05-Hackaday-Fail-tips-tileFail of the Week is a Hackaday column which runs every Wednesday. Help keep the fun rolling by writing about your past failures and sending us a link to the story – or sending in links to fail write ups you find in your Internet travels.

    Filed under: Fail of the Week, Hackaday Columns

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 18:00
    Arduino Model Rocket Launcher for 3D Printed Rockets #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Chris Hall shared a tutorial for his Arduino Model Rocket Launcher for 3D Printed Rockets — featuring the Adafruit 7 Segment LEDs.

    When I was a kid, I loved playing with Estes Rockets, so I decided to get back into the hobby but using all of my maker skizzls. So here’s a really cool Arduino Rocket Launcher launching 3D Printed rockets from my MakerBot Rep2! Enjoy! Fully Open Source for anyone to make!

    Read More.

    Pasted Image 4 10 14 10 55 AM


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    878

    Adafruit 0.56″ 4-Digit 7-Segment Display w/I2C Backpack – Red: What’s better than a single LED? Lots of LEDs! A fun way to make a small display is to use an 8×8 matrix or a 4-digit 7-segment display. Matrices like these are ‘multiplexed’ – so to control all the seven-segment LEDs you need 14 pins. That’s a lot of pins, and there are driver chips like the MAX7219 that can control a matrix for you but there’s a lot of wiring to set up and they take up a ton of space. Here at Adafruit we feel your pain! After all, wouldn’t it be awesome if you could control a matrix without tons of wiring? That’s where these adorable LED matrix backpacks come in. We have them in two flavors – a mini 8×8 and a 4-digit 0.56″ 7-segment. They work perfectly with the matrices we stock in the Adafruit shop and make adding a bright little display trivial. (read more)

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 17:55
    MakerBot Events | THIS TUESDAY 4/15! Francis Bitonti at the MakerBot Retail Store, Greenwich, CT

    040114_Bitonti_event_GREENWICH

    Meet the Designer
    Come by the MakerBot Retail Store in Greenwich, CT this Tuesday, April 15thth from 6:30-8:30pm to meet acclaimed designer, Francis Bitonti. He will be speaking about his studio’s new 3D printed Bristle Dress, and discuss their expansion into cloud manufacturing with the Cloud Collection. The Bristle Dress will be on display along with 3D printed pieces from the Cloud Collection.

    The MakerBot Retail Store is located at 72 Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich, CT. Click here to register. Space will be limited!

     

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 17:00
    Inside a Secret Apple Room Where iPhone Software Was Born


    Adafruit 2888
    Inside a Secret Apple Room Where iPhone Software Was Born – Digits – WSJ.

    The secret meeting room where most of the design decisions for the original iPhone’s software were made is “hallowed ground” to Greg Christie, who designs the software interface for Apple products and one of the first members recruited to work on the device in 2004.

    Check out the tester!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 17:00
    3D Printer Assembly Workshop, April 12-13th @ DM+D in Philadelphia #3DThursday #3DPrinting #reprap


    10127227844 f7a4c44910 b

    A few spots left to sign up to build a 3D printer with master bot builder John Abella — 3D Printer Village community leader and long time Adafruit customer (since 2007!). He is reprising the affordable 3D printer group build + class he and his dad offered last October, this time at Philadelphia’s Department of Making + Doing this weekend. As of last night there was still a spot or two left, so hurry if you are interested!

    This two-day workshop helps class attendees build their own RepRap 3D printer from scratch, from general assembly and wiring, through tuning and printing. Included in the $999 workshop fee: all parts required to build the printer, a set of allen wrenches to work on the printer later, USB and power cords, and a set of sample plastics to get started printing. Food is provided each day.

    ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR – John Abella has written for Make magazine, runs the World Maker Faire 3D Printer Village, and is on the Board of Directors for Barrel of Makers, Delaware’s first makerspace. He currently has six 3D printers at home.

    Read More.

    Botbuilderweekend

    Botbuilding


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

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