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  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Homemade Dune Stillsuit Costume #Dune


    dune stillsuit

    The Fremen may have had only one way to make a stillsuit, but in the modern day, we have access to more supplies than they did on Arrakis. Lake fashioned his stillsuit from super glue, a black leotard, rubber latex, black flex tubing, and more. Here are the basics:

    I got together some materials: 1/4″ thick minicell foam, tubes of goop, lots of super glue, 1/4″ black flex tubing, black leotard, rubber latex and black acrylic paint. I borrowed a mannequin from a friend who has a clothing boutique and put the leotard on it. Then I started with all the tubing networking. Once all the tubing was secured I went to work cutting and glueing the foam to the leotard.

    For the puff pockets I rolled the foam into cylinders and glued onto flat foam. Once all the foam was secure I mixed 3/4 latex and 1/4 black acrylic and painted the suit. The leotard was painted with a aerosol black fabric paint. Then I used an old phone ear piece and tubing to make the nostril/ear piece. I topped it off with blue sclera contact lenses and carried a bag of spice around with me at the party.

    via Coolest Handmade Costumes

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Build your own Homemade Sports Ticker with a Raspberry Pi and LED sign! @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi



    Mike Metral‘s tutorial over at Medium.com grew out of his friend’s super-fan media set-up for viewing March Madness. The tutorial shows you how to build your own sports ticker using a raspberry pi and an LED sign!

    Introduction

    I have a good friend named Eric. Eric is the definition of a sports fanatic. His love for sports goes so deep, that he has completely revamped his living room into a mini sports bar equipped with 5 TV’s that are constantly broadcasting a multitude of games across many sports leagues. His knowledge of sports is even more impressive than his setup — we once tested it by having him run through all of the NCAA March Madness champions from memory since 1979 and he only got stumped on 2 of them, earning him the nickname “The Sports Almanac…”

    Technical Introduction

    So the next day, I asked myself “how hard can building a sports ticker really be?” I knew that at the very least I wanted a few key pieces:

    1.“Free” sporting information for the lowest barriers to entry in this project. This was an adventure in of itself best described in a programmatic sports stat blog post.

    2. An LED sign for the novelty of displaying the game information.

    3. And a Raspberry Pi for ultimate portability, minimal occupancy of space in a living room, and bonus brownie points in the homebrew / hacktivist community.

    After perusing Google, I came across an interesting blog: SF Muni LED Sign at Home with Raspberry Pi — Bingo! Just what I was looking for. This blog described how one guy’s need for instant SF Muni information in his home led him to work through the pain points of writing to an LED sign and ultimately, open sourcing his code. There was just one “problem” for me in all of this, his code was all written in Ruby — I’m a Python guy. If you aren’t familiar with this proverbial coding war, feel free to start here.

    Ticker

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 14:00
    Stanstead Abbotts Raspberry Pi Webcam Catches Candids of Local Bird Life



    Hunting around for some interesting Raspberry Pi webcams, I stumbled on this Stanstead Abbotts Raspberry Pi webcam, trained on a bird feeder, that automatically tweets motion activity as @StasteadPi. Sifting through recent photos, I was surprised how much fun some of these bird feeder candids could be. And a few of the shots give me the impression that the birds are onto us….

    See the latest images on Twitter: @StansteadPi.

    Live feed is available 7am-8pm.

    Read More.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:43
    The Future of Making



    The idea of making isn’t just reserved for handmade bikes, artisan pickles, and Arduino helicopters. The future of making is a product of our human needs and the possibilities we create through technology. This is about a larger shift towards making and the unexpected movements that might occur. It’s about how everyone from you to your grandma might design, make and consume products or experiences in the next 10 to 15 years. In this session Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab, and Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, will host a conversation that considers how we might fashion new tools for the future and then how those tools might influence our lives.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:00
    Build a fridge/freezer temperature alarm using your Raspberry Pi! #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    NewImage

    mazzmn in the Element 14 community posted this great project that he made and a tutorial showing how to do one yourself!

    I’ve been blogging about my experience in Road Test reviewing the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Bundle. As a part of this Road Test I’m creating a Fridge/Freezer Temperature Alarm system for our local food shelf, Channel 1. You can see where this Road Test started for me here

    Background info:

    Last Christmas vacation, I volunteered for a local food shelf called Channel One. I was chatting with the warehouse manager and he mentioned that their large freezer and cooler rooms are protected by commercial monitoring systems, but he’d really like a temperature monitor for their walk-in display-case cooler and freezer. The food shelf is closed from Friday Noon until Monday at 8am, they’ve had several cases where the unit has blown a fuse and food has been ruined. My goal was to use the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Bundle to build a low cost temperature monitoring system that can send free text messages when the temperature in the fridge or freezer is outside of the acceptable range.

    Project Objective:

    • Monitor the temperature of the Freezer and the Fridge Unit – the valid temperature target is 33F in the fridge unit, and -10F in the freezer unit. However, during business hours, the doors are opened by customers and stocking personnel, so the the fridge could possibly fluctuate to 60F. So allow for a wider temperature range during Business Hours vs Off Hours.
    • Audible temp range alarm. Make some noise when the temperature is out of range.
    • Snooze Alarm – If the temperature range is out of whack, support a button that stops the noise.
    • Text message – when the temperature is out of range, send a text message to someone who can either fix the problem, or move the food.
    • LCD Temperature display -make the unit wall mountable, we’ll mount it outside of the cold of the fridge/freezer unit but the temperature will be visible to staff.

    See the full tutorial here.


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    NewImage

    Adafruit RGB Positive 16×2 LCD+Keypad Kit for Raspberry Pi: This new Adafruit Pi Plate makes it easy to use an RGB 16×2 Character LCD. We really like the RGB Character LCDs we stock in the shop. (For RGB we have RGB negative and RGB positive.) Unfortunately, these LCDs do require quite a few digital pins, 6 to control the LCD and then another 3 to control the RGB backlight for a total of 9 pins. That’s nearly all the GPIO available on a Pi! Read more.


    NewImage

    Waterproof DS18B20 Digital temperature sensor + extras: This is a pre-wired and waterproofed version of the DS18B20 sensor. Handy for when you need to measure something far away, or in wet conditions. While the sensor is good up to 125°C the cable is jacketed in PVC so we suggest keeping it under 100°C. Because they are digital, you don’t get any signal degradation even over long distances! These 1-wire digital temperature sensors are fairly precise (±0.5°C over much of the range) and can give up to 12 bits of precision from the onboard digital-to-analog converter. They work great with any microcontroller using a single digital pin, and you can even connect multiple ones to the same pin, each one has a unique 64-bit ID burned in at the factory to differentiate them. Usable with 3.0-5.0V systems.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 13:00
    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: No Tea

    thumb2

    In case you haven’t heard, we’re running a contest on Hackaday Projects for the best Sci-Fi build. We’re a little under two weeks until the deadline for the contest and so far there are a lot of great entries (and lots of great prizes still up for grabs).

    If there’s one thing this contest has taught us, it’s that Hackaday readers have impeccable taste in their choices of books, movies, TV shows, and video games. We were surprised at how many entries there are for Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, a series not generally known for having cool gadgets such as giant mechs, lightsabers, and other impressively awesome stuff. Here’s a roundup of the current HHGTTG submissions for the Sci-Fi contest:

    Doors That Sass

    roundup-robot-doorThe doors in Hitchhiker’s Guide are insufferable self-contented sentient portals programmed by the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation to love their simple lives. Upon everyone opening or closing one of these doors, they thank the person for validating their existence.

    The door in [Jarrett]‘s hackerspace wouldn’t stay closed, so what better way to fix the door than with a robotic door greeter? Actually, it’s just a weight tied to a pulley that keeps the door closed with a little bit of circuitry that plays an .mp3 file when the door moves. Still, self-contented doors. [Goug] is also making one of these self-satisfied doors, but there’s not much in the way of progress.

    Going Up?

    sentient-elevatorThe Happy Vertical People Transporter is HHGTTG’s answer to the common elevator. Like doors, they’re also sentient, but also have ‘defocused temporal perception’ to arrive at a floor before a passenger even realizes they need a lift. [DigiGram] and [Lolla] are working on one of these sentient elevators using a webcam, OpenCV, and some AVR-based electronics.

    Look Out!

    peril-sensitive-glassesThe Joo Janta 200 Super-Chromatic Peril Sensitive Sunglasses allow the user to adapt to danger by blacking out a the first signs of peril. [colabot] and [minimum effective dose] realized you can just buy glasses that can be blacked out electronically in the form of active shutter glasses for a 3D TV. With a few peril sensors, they’re working on finishing up their peril sensitive sunglasses.

    Remember, the Hackaday Projects Sci-Fi contest doesn’t end until April 29th. That leaves you plenty of time to enter your own build. May we suggest a Brownian motion simulation beverage?

     

    Filed under: news

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 12:00
    Setting Up a Killer Audio/Visual System for Your Office using a Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_pi #piday #raspberrypi


    Avpost pointmonitor

    The design blog Betterment has a post about their office set-up design, including how they implemented the Raspberry Pi to install metrics dashboards.

    Want to equip your office with metrics dashboards? We’ve found that Raspberry Pi is an excellent tool for clean visuals that you set up in advance. For instance, at DT we created custom dashboards with Dashing, which we then pointed our Raspberry Pis to. With Dashing we set up how often we want the metrics to refresh, and the Raspberry Pi happily displays the information with crisper visuals than the Chromecast.

    Why else didn’t we use Chromecast to show our dashboards? Well, a major advantage of Raspberry Pi is that it doesn’t need a designated computer in the office to be in charge of displaying the given tab all the time. This way a computer going to sleep or getting shut down doesn’t affect the display. You also don’t need to buy, set up, and power yet another full-on computer.

    What exactly is a Raspberry Pi? It’s a tiny USB-powered computer running Linux. Sure, it’s a slow-as-molasses computer, but it’s pretty cool to use this little device.

    Pro tip: We installed a great app on our Raspberry Pi called Unclutter, which hides that stubborn mouse cursor on the dashboard display.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 11:00
    Preview the upcoming Maynard desktop #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Preview the upcoming Maynard desktop, from RaspberryPi.org:

    The Wayland compositor API gives us a way to present the HVS to applications in a standards-based way. Over the last year we’ve been working with Collabora to implement a custom backend for the Weston reference compositor which uses the HVS to assemble the display. Last year we shipped a technology demonstration of this, and we’ve been working hard since then to improve its stability and performance.

    The “missing piece” required before we can consider shipping a Wayland desktop as standard on the Pi is a graphical shell. This is the component that adds task launching and task switching on top of the raw compositor service provided by Wayland/Weston. The LXDE shell we ship with X on the Pi doesn’t support Wayland, while those shells that do (such as GNOME) are too heavyweight to run well on the Pi. We’ve therefore been working with Collabora since the start of the year to develop a lightweight Wayland shell, which we’ve christened Maynard (maintaining the tradition of New England placenames). While it’s some distance from being ready for the prime time, we though we’d share a preview so you can see where we’re going….

    Read More.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 10:00
    Control 4 servos with a PS3 controller and Raspberry Pi! #piday #raspberrypi @raspberry_pi



    Check out this fun video from mechnable on controlling 4 servos with a PS3 controller and a pi.

    Controlling 4 continuous rotation servos with a PS3 controller on a raspberry pi. Using Adafruit 16 Servo Driver to run the motors with a 4X AA battery pack. Bluetooth control to the PS3 controller. The motors are pressure-controlled, so the harder you press the button the faster they go.

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NewImage

    Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Driver – I2C interface: You want to make a cool robot, maybe a hexapod walker, or maybe just a piece of art with a lot of moving parts. Or maybe you want to drive a lot of LEDs with precise PWM output. Then you realize that your microcontroller has a limited number of PWM outputs! What now? You could give up OR you could just get this handy PWM and Servo driver breakout.

    When we saw this chip, we quickly realized what an excellent add-on this would be. Using only two pins, control 16 free-running PWM outputs! You can even chain up 62 breakouts to control up to 992 PWM outputs (which we would really like to see since it would be glorious) Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 10:00
    Sniffing Vending Machine Buses

    Sniffing the Multidrop Bus

     

    We’ve talked about a variety of protocols and how to deal with them in the past. Today, [Dan] is working on sniffing vending machine Multidrop Bus. The Multidrop Bus (MDB) protocol is a standard used in vending machines to connect devices such as currency collectors to the host controller.

    To connect to the bus, interface hardware is required. [Dan] worked out compliant hardware and connected it to an Arduino. With the device on the bus, [Dan] got to work on an Arduino sketch to parse the MDB data into a human-readable format. With that working, the bus can easily be sniffed over the Arduino’s serial console.

    This is just the start of a more involved project. Since this protocol is used to communicate with a vending machine’s currency collector or card reader, being able to communicate it would allow him to implement his own payment methods. The plan is to augment the vending machine he operates at Vancouver Hack Space to accept Bitcoin. We’re looking forward to seeing that project unfold.

    Filed under: Hackerspaces, Network Hacks

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 09:00
    Learn to program the ATtiny85 from your Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    NewImage

    instructables user prb3333 posted this useful tutorial on programming the ATtiny85 with your Pi.

    These instructions tell you how to setup and program the ATtiny85 microcontroller from a Raspberry Pi via the SPI interface. Lots of people use the Ardiuno to do this (then you can use the Arduino IDE and simplified C commands), or you can use a USB based programmer. I do not have an Ardiuno and don’t want to buy a dedicated programmer. I do have a Pi, so I was pleased to learn I could use it as a way to get into microcontroller programming.

    You will need:

    • Raspberry Pi
    • ATtiny85 chip
    • 5 x 1K resistors (or similar)
    • LED of your choice
    • A connection to the GPIO of the Pi, and a breadboard and wire.

    See the full tutorial here.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 08:00
    Kolibre Vadelma: An Open Source Talking Book Player Built using a Raspberry Pi @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi



    Kolibre Vadelma is an open source talking book player powered by a raspberry pi. Check out how to build it here! via raspberrypi.org

    Kolibre Vadelma

    Kolibre Vadelma exemplifies the possibilities that exist with the open source software published by Kolibre. A talking book player can be built on various existing hardware platforms, including a Raspberry Pi-unit. Kolibre has published instructions on how to build a solution called Kolibre Vadelma (the finnish word for Raspberry). The source code is availabe at github.com/kolibre/meta-kolibre and the instructions on how to build the player is available in the wiki. The meta-kolibre layer uses the different Kolibre libraries to build the player…

    Kolibre Vadelma navigation

    To navigate in a book or in the menus with Kolibre Vadelma you will need a control panel, such as a keyboard or a number pad keyboard (numpad) with an USB interface. Kolibre Vadelma is by default designed to work with a numpad, but can also be configured to work with other control panels. And who knows? Perhaps speech recognition in the near future?

    The keys on the numpad are arranged in pretty much the same manner as the keys on common DAISY players . The up, down, left, right arrow keys are used to switch navigation level and move back and forth in a publication. The number 5 key is used for play and pause.

    Kolibre Vadelma keypad desc web

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 08:00
    New Product Friday: Just in Case...

    We’re back with another round of products for your Friday. This week was have an assortment of different products as well as some demos.

    We also did a demo for our new FadeCandy.

    That concludes the video portion of our program; let’s take a closer look at our new products.

    alt text

    We have a bunch of new enclosures for all your goodies this week. Chances are, if you have a board that needs a case, we’ve got what you need. All of these cases are made by the same company that makes the Pi Tin for the Raspberry Pi. They are simple economical cases that give you access to all the inputs and outputs, and don’t require tools to put them together. We have them for the Raspberry Pi Camera Module (in both clear and black), the PiFace (in just clear), the Beaglebone Black (clear and black), the Arduino Yun (clear and black), and the Arduino Uno (clear and black). They are very well thought-out cases with a lot of little features. The price is great too.

    alt text

    We have a few more new products from Adafruit this week as well. The FadeCandy is an easy way to control NeoPixel LEDs or any of the WS2811/12 variants. Eight outputs line the bottom of the FadeCandy to provide you with a way to support up to 512 LEDs total, assigned to each output in eight strips of 64 LEDs each.

    alt text

    This is the half-sized Raspberry Pi Perma-Proto Breadboard from Adafruit, a simple solder-able-type bare PCB kit that affords you with the luxury of soldering in your own custom prototype with GPIO connection capabilities to a Raspberry Pi. It comes with a shrouded GPIO header and has power rails and two separate prototyping areas.

    alt text

    Also for your Pi, this card adapter plugs into the SD socket on a Raspberry Pi and lets you use microSD cards without them sticking out. The adapter is only about 5.5mm thick and can easily fit into most cases that could surround a RPi without needing to remove the case.

    alt text

    We now have the BMP180 in retail packaging. This was the replacement to the popular BMP085 pressure sensor. The BMP180 offers a pressure measuring range of 300 to 1100 hPa with an accuracy down to 0.02 hPa in advanced resolution mode.

    In addition to the products listed above, we also have some new products in our sale category. Be sure to check the category periodically for new additions. You can find some good deals in there from time to time.

    As always, thanks for reading, watching, and giving us suggestions of new products to carry. We’ll be back again next week with more new products. See you then!

    comments | comment feed

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 07:00
    Raspberry Pi Remote Audio Link

    Hardware for remote audio link

     

    In broadcast, lots of people are still using dedicated analog lines to connect remote sites. These operate like old telephone systems: you call up the operator and request to be patched through to a specific site. They’re also rather expensive.

    For a hospital radio station, [Marc] wanted to replace the old system with something less costly. The result is his Raspberry Pi STL in a Box. Inside the box is a Raspberry Pi, PiFace display, a pair of meters, and some analog hardware for the audio.

    On the software side, the system uses LiquidSoap to manage the stream. LiquidSoap uses a language to configure streams, and [Marc] has a write-up on how to configure LiquidSoap for this application. On the hardware side, SSM2142 ICs convert the signal from single-ended to balanced. The meters use the LM3915 bar drivers to control the meters.

    The Python script that controls the box is provided, and could be helpful for anyone needing to build their own low-cost audio link.

     

    Filed under: digital audio hacks

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 07:00
    Automatic chessboard using Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Read More.

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 06:44
    3D Vector Graphics on a WWII Radar Tube with Arduino

    radarArduinoGoogle engineer Eric Schaepler has a passion for antique display technologies.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 06:00
    LEGO Bookreader: Digitize books with mindstorms and Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    MAKE has posted this fantastic project with a full tutorial. View it here.

    Using Lego motors and blocks, the Raspberry Pi, and a BrickPi, we built our own digital book reader out of Legos that can digitize real paper books.

    We wanted to develop a book digitizer that could read books aloud. We were fascinated by Google’s Google Books project, and thought “Why couldn’t we do this at home?”

    In our first attempt, we tried a proof of concept where we built the BrickPi Bookreader to read a Kindle aloud.

    We redesigned the Bookreader to read real paper books. In our example, we digitize a paper copy of Horowitz and Hill’s The Art of Electronics.

    NewImage

    How it Works

    The Bookreader flips through the pages of a book, taking pictures of each page, and then turns each picture into a text document.

    First, the bookreader prepares a page to turn by rotating a Lego motor. Gravity keeps just enough friction on the book page to inch the page forward. Next, a Lego arm beam swings around, forcing the page over.

    After a new page is turned, the Raspberry Pi camera takes an image of the new page in JPEG format, and saves it to file. Using open source Optical Character Recognition software on the Raspberry Pi, the BrickPi turns the page image into text.

    Finally, the Pi saves the text. Now we’ve digitized the page, and you have the start of your book. Just for fun, in our example we use some free text-to-speech software, and the Raspberry Pi reads the book out loud over some speakers we attached. Once the page is read and stored, the Raspberry Pi, through the BrickPi, turns to the next page of the book.

    Check out the full tutorial at MAKE.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 06:00
    Adafruit Bitcoin report #bitcoin #makerbusiness


    1280X698 Adafruit Bitcoin Banner

    We thought it could be interesting to someone out there to share how the orders placed at Adafruit using bitcoin was going. We launched mid November 2013 and the average amount of total bitcoin orders per day was about $1,572.14 USD, with an average order size of $231.20 USD. Peak orders was around 100/day using bitcoin, in the last 30 days it’s about 5 to 10 orders / day using bitcoin and average amount per order being $170.86 USD. Other online stores in the maker world started taking bitcoin too, if you have some coins to spend, head on over to EMSL (Evil Mad Scientist). The coolest part of this experiment for us was an Adafruit community member built a bitcoin miner and then used the coins they mined to buy Adafruit electronics with the mined coins. More bitcoin news here…. Oh, would we add bitcoin now if we didn’t have it, based on what we know now? Sure, the big spend-coin-rush is over, glad we added it when we did!

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 04:00
    Interactive Gloves Turn Gestures into Music

    Imogen Heap wearing her Mi.Mu gloves

    [Imogen Heap] is a UK-based musician who is trying to change the way we think about making music. She’s been working on a pair of gloves called the Mi.Mu, and they’re getting close to production.

    In the included interview she explains that while computers and technology have brought many new advances to music, twiddling dials and pushing random buttons “is not very exciting for me, or the audience”. With these gloves, the artist becomes one with the music and interaction.

    The current iteration of gloves use flex sensors along each finger to determine the movement (along with motion sensors for other gestures). She’s been through many designs and hopes to integrate e-materials into the next — using the actual glove as the sensor (not physical flex sensors).

    She’s been working with both developers and musicians mapping the various motions of the gloves to music which makes sense in an intuitive way, and it’s very unique to see in action.

    [Imogen Heap] was also on Letterman a few years ago! For more information about the Mi.Mu gloves, she has a website under construction, but offers an email signup mailing list.

    [Thanks Aaron!]

    Filed under: musical hacks

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 - 01:00
    The Persistence of Jumping Rope

    POV Jump Rope

    [Antonio Ospite] recently took up jump rope to increase his cardio, and also being a hacker decided to have some extra fun with it. He’s created the JMP-Rope — the Programmable Jump Rope.

    He’s using the same principle as a normal POV (Persistence of Vision) display, but with a cool twist. He’s managed to put the microcontroller (a Trinket) and battery into the handle of the jump rope. Using a slip ring system, the RGB signal gets passed to the rope, which contains the LEDs. It’s a pretty slick setup, and he’s written another post all about how he did the hardware.

    To create the images for his JMP-Rope, he’s outlined the steps to a successful POV image on his blog. These include re-sizing the image to a circle (duh), reducing the color palette, and then performing pixel mapping using a discrete conversion (from polar to Cartesian coordinates). After that it’s just a matter of representing your new-found pixel map in a 1D animation, played column by column. [Antonio] stores these frames on the micro-controller as an RLE (run length encoded) indexed bitmap.

    Stick around to see how he made it, and some other cool examples of what it can do!

     

    Diagram of Persistence of Vision Jump Rope

    Diagram of Handle

    The resulting images from his JMP-Rope are pretty impressive — it almost looks like Firefox was made for a POV display!

    JMP-rope-Firefox

    Firefox!

    [Thanks Alan!]

    Filed under: led hacks

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