Empty

Total: 0,00 €

h:D

Planet

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 15:00
    Students Build Video Wall for Classroom using Raspberry Pis @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi


    Video wall e1395883925930

    Students at an Australian high school build video walls for classrooms using the raspberry pi as a low-cost alternative to the traditional video projector, via Australian Teacher Magazine.

    VIDEO projectors are commonly used in schools nowadays, but one group of senior students have been learning to build these devices from scratch with the help of the Raspberry Pi.

    The potential of this cheap and tiny computer has been explored extensively for several years now, but Andrew Moss from Dixon College in the ACT believes what his students are doing is a world first.

    “I think the students really get into the idea that they are the first in the world that have tried this out and if they succeed then they are the first in the world to have succeeded in doing it, so that really is a big motivation for them,” the robotics and engineering teacher says.

    Year 11 and 12 students, along with the help of Canberra Institute of Technology TAFE students, have been working on the video wall made up of recycled electronics.

    “We wanted to have large video screens around the school and we can’t afford to buy them. So I came across this technology … we can basically have a screen on the wall that is totally scalable, so it can be 40 inches in diameter diagonally, or it could be 80 or 360 just by adding more screens to it,” Moss explains.

    Like most schools, the college upgrades their computer equipment regularly and Moss began to notice there was a good deal of it ending up at the refuge tip.

    “The 17 inch monitors we had here for a number of years have now been upgraded to 19 inch or 21 inch, so we have about 300 monitors that were going to go to landfill.

    “I decided that instead of sending them to landfill, we could reuse them. We’ve managed to source some old networking equipment that was being thrown away, so we’re using that in the video wall as well, and even the backing mounting board and all the materials like the screen and stuff were all parts of computers.”

    The video wall can screen any type of video, and Moss envisages the school using the wall for assemblies and presentations, as well as for art installations around the school.

    “We certainly need to have installation screens regularly throughout the school and there’s been some interest in us using these Raspberry Pi video walls to provide installation screens,” he says.

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 14:01
    vPlotter using Adafruit PiTFT for @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi #piday





    vPlotter using Adafruit PiTFT.

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 14:00
    Why Care About DIY Space?

    pinkstripeysocks_cardboard_space_shuttle_01Prepare for lift-off. MAKE's DIY space week launches April 7.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 14:00
    Hacking the AM2315 Humidity Sensor #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    Sopwith ismellsmoke net wp content uploads 2014 03 PI How To AM2315 pdf

    Sopwith shared a tutorial for his adventure with the AM2315:

    I recently discovered the AOSONG AM2315 humidity/temperature sensor and was quite intrigued. This is a very accurate and affordable device that is a nice addition to a current project. Supposedly, this device is i2c compliant, so I figured it would be easy to talk to. Little did I know….

    After hacking around for a couple of long days I was able to get the device working on my breadboard with a Pi Cobbler. Google and forum searches determined there are a lot of people struggling to get the device to work….

    Read More. And pdf documentation here.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    1293

    AM2315 – Encased I2C Temperature/Humidity Sensor: Finally we have an I2C-interface temperature & humidity sensor in a nice enclosed style. This sensor contains a DS18B20 temperature sensor and a capacitive humidity sensor. A small microcontroller inside does the readings and provides a simple I2C interface for reading the finished & calibrated output data. Especially nice is that this sensor is in a rugged case with mounting bracket, which makes it way superior to a normal PCB-mounted sensor. While it is not rated as ‘weatherproof’, this sensor would do much better for sensing where there might be wind, rain, zombies, etc. than SHT PCB-breakout sensors, and the i2c interface makes it easier to interface with microcomputers that can’t do the delicate timing of the DHT sensors. (read more)


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 13:15
    New Project: How to Make a Simple Chunky Wooden Planter

    18-finished-planter-with-plant-potJust in time for spring, an easy-to-build planter.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 13:04
    Building an Arduino out of Paper

    The Paperduino TinyFollowing in the footsteps of the original Paperduino—and the Paperduino Leonardo—comes the Paperduino Tiny.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 13:00
    Fixing Misaligned PVC With Kerf Bends

    misalignment-coupler

    Our old pal [Jeremy Cook] is doing his own remix of [Theo Jansen]‘s Strandbeest, and like the original, he’s using PVC pipe. Unlike the originals, he’s powering it with motors, not wind, and this has caused a few problems in transmitting mechanical power through a piece of PVC. Nothing is perfect, and in a few points in the legs movement the shaft shakes violently. One motor was lost and another nearly so before [Jeremy] came up with a flex coupler made from PVC.

    The technique [Jeremy] is using has seen a lot of use with people building laser cut enclosures. It’s called kerf bending, and it works simply by cutting a few slits in a panel that allow it to bend slightly. This technique was replicated by [Jeremy] on a miter saw, cutting eight slots halfway through a one inch PVC pipe, with each successive cut offset 90 degrees.

    The new design works well for transmitting power, and he’s not ruining motors any more. Check out the video below.

    Filed under: robots hacks

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 13:00
    The Raspberry Jolt is a crime-fighting mini nerf-gun robot #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    This mini pi controlled robot has the potential to wreck havoc on your co-workers! Jordan B. has the full tutorial up on her blog.

    Meet Raspberry Jolt, my mini nerf-dart-shooting robot with WIFI control and remote video recording. It’s powered by the first gen Romo by Romotive and a raspberry pi.

    Parts list:

    I used the Adafruit 16 Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Driver tutorial with this circuit and Adafruit’s Python Library to hook up the servo to the Pi. After I had the circuit working on a breadboard I used the male header pins and female jumper wires to slim down the bot. Getting the Raspberry Pi to auto-connect to WIFI and run headless took some work; I used wpa_supplicant.conf to do it, and installed vncserver and SSH to control it remotely. I installed Avahi, which is the same as Apple’s Bonjour, so that I could always connect to the pi via http://raspberrypi.local once it boots and connects to the router. (However, once you have its IP address, shooting the dart is faster via IP address rather than by DNS lookup).

    I modified Adafruit’s Servo_Example.py script to pull the servo back for 1 second and then return to front position. To access the Pi’s GPIO pins you need to be root, so I followed this tutorial to write and compaile a simple C script that could temporarily run commands as root. (I skipped the shell script part and just ran the python command from the C script). Finally I installed apache and PHP, and wrote a simple PHP script that calls the pulltrigger python script.

    Mounting the servo to the trigger was the hardest part. My first two versions had the servo placed next to the trigger, but that was really hard to mount onto the round barrel of the gun. I also tried an all-lego chasis with reinforcement, but it was too heavy and bulky to mount onto the Romo.

    Read more and see the full tutorial here.

    NewImage


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    NewImage

    Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Driver – I2C interface – PCA9685: You want to make a cool robot, maybe a hexapod walker, or maybe just a piece of art with a lot of moving parts. Or maybe you want to drive a lot of LEDs with precise PWM output. Then you realize that your microcontroller has a limited number of PWM outputs! What now? You could give up OR you could just get this handy PWM and Servo driver breakout. Read more.


    NewImage

    Adafruit Assembled Pi Cobbler Breakout + Cable for Raspberry Pi: Now that you’ve finally got your hands on a Raspberry Pi® , you’re probably itching to make some fun embedded computer projects with it. What you need is an add on prototyping Pi Cobbler from Adafruit, which can break out all those tasty power, GPIO, I2C and SPI pins from the 26 pin header onto a solderless breadboard. This set will make “cobbling together” prototypes with the Pi super easy. Designed for use with Raspberry Pi Model B AND Model A, both revisions. Read more.


  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 12:00
    15 Useful Commands Every Raspberry Pi User Should Know @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi #piday


    Muo raspberrypi commands ft 840x420

    Check out these 15 Useful Commands Every Raspberry Pi User Should Know, from makeuseof.

    The Raspberry Pi: Yes, It’s Linux

    You’ve imaged your SD card and booted your Raspberry Pi. You’re probably using the Raspbian operating system and updated and configured it so that it meets your requirements. What you may not have realised is that despite the Windows-style icon-driven desktop, Raspbian is a Linux distribution. Several operating systems are available for Raspberry Pi, the vast majority of which are Linux.

    Rather than an attempt to get people using Linux by stealth, the Raspberry Pi relies on these operating systems because of their open source origins and versatility.

    (And because it’s rather good.)

    Now, you can probably use a Linux operating system with a graphical user interface without using the command line, but this is where most of the real power lies.

    Raspberry Pi Command Line Basics

    We wouldn’t expect you to start using the command line without knowing how it works. Essentially, it is a method for instructing the computer to perform tasks. It’s really not all that different from pointing and clicking, only you’re expected to use text.

    With a mouse-driven GUI, you can easily switch directories and read their contents. In the command line, you can check which directory you’re viewing by entering pwd (print working directory). Use ls to list the contents of the directory, and change directory by entering cd. For instance, cd edward will switch to a directory called “Edward”, while cd.. will always return focus to the parent directory. New directories are possible with mkdir newdir, where “newdir” is the directory label. You can also create a succession of new directories with mkdir –p /home/edward/newdir1/newdir2, where both newdir1 and newdir2 are created, but this will only work with the –p switch.

    These are basics of all command line interfaces, and can be easily picked up. What you really need are useful commands.

    Display Hardware Information

    muo-raspberrypi-commands-cpuinfo

    On a Windows PC or Mac you can easily find hardware information by looking in System or About This Mac. To find out about your Raspberry Pi’s hardware, enter the following:
    cat /proc/cpuinfo

    This will output information about the device’s processor. For instance, where you see BCM2708, this indicates that the chip was manufactured by Broadcom.

    Various other hardware information can be found by running commands under the proc directory.

    cat /proc/meminfo displays details about the Raspberry Pi’s memory

    cat /proc/partitions reveals the size and number of partitions on your SD card or HDD

    cat /proc/version shows you which version of the Pi you are using.

    All of these details can be used to assess what your Raspberry Pi might be capable of. Further information can be acquired using the vcgencmd series of commands, which can reveal things like CPU temperature (vcgencmd measure_temp). This can prove vital if you’re concerned about airflow…

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 11:00
    “Skyline 02″ by PatricioGonzalezVivo #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    PatricioGonzalezVivo:

    Skyline 02 on #RaspberryPi & adafruit ‘s TFT display and thermal printer. #openframeworks

    Read more.

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 10:01
    Throwback Handheld Built with Modern Hobby Hardware

    magpi-gaming-handheld

    Remember all of those fantastically horrible handheld LCD games that hit the toy stores back in the ’90s. You know, the ones that had custom LCD screens to make for some fake animation. Here’s an example of what those should have been. It’s an LCD-based handheld with some soul.

    The entire thing is roughly the size of a television remote, with a 3D printed case making it very presentable. But looking at the wiring which hides inside proves this is one-of-a-kind. The Arduino Pro Mini is probably the biggest difference in technology from back in the day compared to now. It has plenty of space for all of the different settings and games shown off in the clip below. The user interface itself is definitely a throw-back though. The Nokia 3310 screen boasts a whopping 84×48 pixel monochrome area. There are four buttons serving as a d-pad, and two as action buttons. Perhaps the greatest feature (besides the printed case we already mentioned) is the ability to recharge the internal battery via USB.

    [Zippy314] built this with his son. What’s more fun: learning to program the games, or mastering them and discovering the bugs you missed along the way?

     

    [via Brad's Projects]

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, handhelds hacks

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 10:00
    Easy as Pi piano system will help you learn how to play #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_pi



    YouTube user Shane Snipe made this cool and useful project to let your pi teach you how to play piano!

    My dad and I made the Easy as Pi Piano system to make learning chords faster and easier. This project took about 50 hours to complete due to the fact that we were new to the Python programming language. The Easy as Pi Piano system functions as a piano teacher. Learn to play the chords to your favorite song! The servo motor lasers show you which keys to play. Slow it down or speed it up with the scale. On the monitor, you will see the finger placements, the current chord, and the lyrics to the whole song. We hope that our hard work makes learning how to play piano easy as pie.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 09:00
    RasPiCamcorder 3 – Now with PiTFT! #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    RasPi.tv has made this awesome RasPiCamcorder using Adafruit’s PiTFT! Check out the build here.

    Back in December, you might remember I blogged about using Texy’s 2.8″ touchscreen with the Pi camera.

    At the time I was also aware of the very similar, but slightly more compact, PiTFT by Adafruit. The space for four slim buttons on the PCB made it look ideal. So, this week, when SK Pang tweeted about having PiTFT back in stock, I snapped one up. I also thought I’d put it in a nice case. The Pimoroni PiTFT Pibow looked ideal, so I ordered one of those as well. Both arrived 2 days later. It was time to put it all together. See how I got on in the video…

    So I set to work assembling and installing the PiTFT. And here is the part where I was blown away. The PiTFT assembly and installation instructions, written by LadyAda herself, are absolutely outstanding. They’re exactly in alignment with my RasPi.TV philosophy of “complete, clear instructions that work first time”. Lovely clear photographs and clear instructions. I love it when people take the time to do things properly. (Anyone who’s worked with me knows I get very annoyed by sloppy/lazy/rushed/unclear written communications).

    You have to remember that when you buy from Adafruit, you’re not just buying hardware, you’re buying a complete experience. I hope that I’ll be able to emulate that with HDMIPi and RasPiO®

    I’ve recently been using a Pi with camera and HDMIPi screen to do live photo tweets from events. This is great if you’re based at a demo table, but if you want to be out and about, a large screen can be cumbersome. Since the hardware is basically the same as for a RasPiCamcorder, it seems logical to squish this all down into one compact machine that can do both. So that’s what we have here, with RasPiCamcorder 3.

    Read more.

    NewImage

    NewImage


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NewImage

    PiTFT Mini Kit – 320×240 2.8″ TFT+Touchscreen for Raspberry Pi: Is this not the cutest little display for the Raspberry Pi? It features a 2.8″ display with 320×240 16-bit color pixels and a resistive touch overlay. The plate uses the high speed SPI interface on the Pi and can use the mini display as a console, X window port, displaying images or video etc. Best of all it plugs right in on top! Read more.


  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 08:00
    “Raspberry Pi Projects for Kids” a great resource for parents and educators @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi


    BjqctVTCMAA5HIW

    Raspberry Pi Projects for Kids, an open-source book by Daniel Bates, is now available online here. The book shows you how to set up your pi and also includes detailed project tutorials that are great for both kids and adults alike.

    Technology today is growing rapidly, with all sorts of cool gadgets, applications, and games made thanks to the rise of computer programming. The Raspberry Pi is a crafty device that has promoted the teaching of basic computer science in schools, catching the attention of both young and old. Although learning to program offers a unique set of skills that allows you to explore your creative side, it has its own challenges, which may mean you will need a helping hand.

    This handy guide will launch you into the world of computer programming by showing you how to build your own amazing applications. Raspberry Pi Projects for Kids contains several awesome projects for you to get hands-on with, including creating your own games, crafting your own simple electronics, and making your own interactive map. By learning how to use Scratch and Python in your programming, you will be a computer scientist in no time!

    After you have become comfortable with setting up and playing with your Raspberry Pi, you will be transported into this exciting world of technology, where you will get to grips with using Scratch, Raspberry Pi’s official programming language, in order to develop your own version of Angry Birds! After connecting new circuitry, lights, and switches to your Raspberry Pi, you will then get to use Scratch to create your own reaction game. See for yourself who’s the quickest off the mark!)You will finally get to step things up by developing an interactive map of your own hometown using the Python programming language. You will be working for Google before you know it!

    This book will teach you everything you need to know about using your Raspberry Pi in order to develop your own games, applications, and electronic circuits. It’s time to have your Pi and eat it, because you will be able to create virtually anything you like.

    Read more.


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 08:00
    New Product Friday: High Five For Wi-Fi

    Products, products, and more products. That’s what Fridays are all about here at SparkFun. We have a few new things this week. Check out the video and hear our engineer Shawn explain the new CC3000 shield and breakout board.

    I’m not kidding here: $50k for the first person to figure out how to harvest Shawn’s energy. I think the secret might be in his bow-tie. More research is necessary.

    alt text

    The CC300 is a handy little WiFi module from TI. This week, we are selling the bare module and a breakout board, as well as a shield. Pick your flavor. The module allows you to connect your project to a wireless network. It even has a clever little setup routine that enables you to configure the module for your network using your phone. So when you move the project from network to network, you don’t have to go in and reprogram the sketch. Nifty.

    alt text

    Looking for a bunch of sensors, but don’t want to throw down for the full sensor kit? Check out the new essential sensor kit. This kit includes a lot of our most popular sensors including a flex sensor, tilt sensor, hall effect sensor, force sensitive resistor, photocell, and more! It’s a great deal for beginners or anyone that just wants to start playing around with how microcontrollers interact with hardware.

    alt text

    We’ve been using double-sided foam tape for years to stick PCBs to enclosures. It works well, but sometimes you need something more, uh, industrial. Check out the foam PCB tape. This stuff is industrial grade foam tape for sticking things to other things. The ‘VHB’ stands for ‘very high bond’ (no, there’s not going to be a new 007 movie filmed in Denver). The tape is 1" wide and you get about a yard in length. Check the video above and you can see how strong it is.

    alt text

    People have been asking for us to carry the exact transistor that comes with the SIK. Sure. Here you go.

    alt text

    Lastly, there’s a new Beaglebone Black out this week. This isn’t shipping yet, we only have it for pre-order. This one is the ‘Rev C’ which is identical in every way, but has 4GB of onboard flash memory (instead of 2GB) and is $10 more. Keep in mind that Beaglebone plans to fill backorders on the ‘Rev B’ before the new ‘C’ starts shipping.

    That’s it for this week everyone. Thanks for watching, reading, and buying stuff. We’ll be back again next week with more new products, tutorials, and other things you might enjoy. See you then!

    comments | comment feed

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 07:00
    Blinkenschild, The RGB LED Display For Every Occasion

    turd

    One morning [overflo] decided to protest the European Parliament’s stance on equine rights of defecation, a cherished liberty dating back to the time of Charlemagne. The best way to do this is, of course, blinking lights. He calls his project Blinkenschild, and it’s one of the best portable LED displays we’ve seen.

    The display is based around fifteen RGB-123 LED panels, each containing an 8×8 matrix of WS2811 LEDs. That’s 960 pixels, all controlled with a Teensy 3.1. Power is supplied by fifteen LiPo cells wired together in parallel giving him 6 Ah of battery life. Clunky, yes, but it’s small enough to fit in a backpack and that’s what [overflo] had sitting around anyway.

    The animations for the display are generated by Glediator, an unfortunately not open source control app for LED matrices. Glediator sends data out over a serial port but not over IP or directly into a file. Not wanting to carry a laptop around with him, [overflo] created a virtual serial port and dumped the output of Glediator into a file so it could be played back stored on an SD card and controlled with an Android app. Very clever, and just the thing to raise awareness of horse and Internet concerns.

    Video below.

    UPDATE: Check out [overflo's] clarification in the comments below.

     

    Filed under: led hacks

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 07:00
    Quake III bounty: we have a winner! #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi


    QuakeIII

    Quake III bounty: we have a winner! @ RaspberryPi.org Pi.

    At the end of February, Broadcom announced the release of full documentation for the VideoCore IV graphics core, and a complete source release of the graphics stack for the BCM21553 cellphone chip. To celebrate, we offered a $10k prize to the first person to port this codebase to the BCM2835 application processor that sits at the heart of the Raspberry Pi, and to get Quake 3 (which already runs on the Pi) running on the newly open ARM driver, rather on the closed-source VPU driver. Our hope was that the ported driver would be a helpful reference for anyone working on a Mesa/Gallium3D driver for VideoCore IV.

    I’m delighted to say that we have a winner. Simon Hall is a longtime Pi hacker, who also produced the first ARMv6-accelerated copies-and-fills library back in 2012 and wrote the DMA kernel module that we integrate in our Raspbian releases. The prize couldn’t have gone to a more fitting recipient.

    So, without further ado, here are Simon’s instructions for getting the driver up and running….

    Read More.

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 06:00
    pidart: An electronic dart board with superpowers #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi



    Daniel Fett made this tricked out dartboard with tons of cool features- check out the all the details over at his blog!

    At our research group at the university, we play a round of darts every day during the lunch break. We used to use an cheap electronic dart board and entered the results manually into our “Dartabase” (“Dartenbank” in german). Obviously, this manual process is not very satisfying for a geek, so I created a Raspberry Pi driven electronic dart board (called, of course, “pidart”).

    I started out from a standard soft electronic dart board and disassembled it. Then, I connected the sensors in the board and the buttons to an Arduino Mega microcontroller. The Arduino sends the dart hits and button presses on the board to the Raspberry Pi, where the pidart software runs. The Pi shows the current score and other data on a screen connected via HDMI and provides a web interface to control the software. I will provide a bit more technical background below.

    Features

    The main feature of pidart is, of course, to keep track of the scores of each player and to enter the final results into our Dartabase. Apart from that, over the time, I added more features:

    • Skipping players: Sometimes, one of us takes a short break during the game or cannot attend the game from the very beginning. In this case, we can tell pidart to skip the player until he returns. The player can catch up the missed rounds later and even still win the game when the other players have checked out already (if he checks out in less rounds than them).
    • The same feature also allows for sequential games, where each player plays a full game straight and the players play after each other.
    • Text-to-speech: pidart uses a synthesized voice to give spoken comments for each throw of a dart.
    • Background music: pidart plays different background music depending on the game situation. You might know that music from somewhere…
    • Live ranking: Our Dartabase creates a ranking of the players based on the ELO system. The pidart software predicts the game’s outcome during the game and shows the new Dartabase ranking.
    • Web interface: Not only is a web browser the main GUI for pidart, it also allows for multiple clients to watch the current game in real time. Players can follow the game from anywhere (for example, on a smart phone).
    • Post-fact editing of results: If the board registered something wrong or someone accidentally touched the board, the last frame can be edited manually.
    • Adding and removing players dynamically: Players can leave the game (if they are allowed so by the other players ;-) ) and even join the game at any time without any disadvantage.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 04:01
    Raspberry Pi UPS Using Supercapacitors

    600x337x600px-Raspi_UPS2.jpg.pagespeed.ic.wM_vKuckdA

    What happens when you want to integrate a Raspberry Pi into some kind of project that gets turned on and off with mains voltage? Do you power the Pi separately, or make a UPS for it?

    [Lutz Lisseck] decided he wanted to turn his ambient-lamp (Rundbuntplasma) on and off with only the main power switch in his Hackerpsace. He could build a traditional UPS using a battery pack (it’s only 5V after all!) but decided to take it a step further. He picked up a pair of 50F supercapacitors. This way his UPS would last longer than his Pi would! The caps store just enough power that when the main supply is cut, a GPIO notices, tells the Pi, and it begins a shutdown sequence lasting about 30 seconds.

    While [Lutz] is using two 2.7V supercapacitors, he mentions it would be a lot cheaper to use a step-up converter instead of putting them in series — but he had the caps on hand so decided to use both.

    If you need it to last a bit longer, you could make one with rechargeable batteries…

    Filed under: Raspberry Pi

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 - 03:15
    Makers on Ice

    The team's TAISU carbon-sensing device, with wi-fi observation camera, at the top of the Bonney Riegel in the Antarctic Dry Valleys.In Antarctica, maker spirit is the key to survival.

    Read more on MAKE


Pages