Empty

Total: 0,00 €

h:D

Planet

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:00
    From the Forums: Creating the Dream Acquarium with an Arduino #ArduinoD14

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 12 02 AM


    Creating the Dream Acquarium with an Arduino
    , shared on the Adafruit Forums:

    So, I am throwing my hat into the Arduino total tank build, and I will try and document as much of my journey as possible here. I have tinkered around with the Arduino in the past, but have never attempted anything of this complexity. I have zero real world programming experience, but enjoy reading sites like hackaday, lifehacker, and such. What I’m saying here is that my code will look pathetically amateurish and possibly unreadable if viewed by a professional…

    So, the goals of my personal build will be:

    • Autodosing
    • Keeping track of the fert levels and alarming if they become low (I am rather forgetful and would like a warning)
    • Keeping my light schedule
    • Controlling CO2 solenoid
    • Scheduling an auxiliary RGB strip, as I will shamelessly steal from AnotherHobby Fallen Tree Branch 60cm
    • The aux RGB strip will have sunrise, sunset, and moonlight as AnotherHobby has, ideally
    • Writing all of the alarm times to the DS1307 RAM, in case of a power outage (Unnecessary, but what the heck, why not?)
    • Keeping track of tank temp and cutting power to the tank heater in case of an issue
    • Anything else that I don’t need but would like to try and implement

    Thus far, my current build consists of:

    • SainSmart Arduino Mega 2560 (Knockoff from Amazon for like $28)
    • Sparkfun DS1307 RTC
    • Adafruit 20×4 LCD display
    • Adafruit 10K Precision Epoxy Thermistor
    • Small piezo buzzer for alarms
    • Assorted buttons, resistors, transistors to make it all work

    Read More.


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog  as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 10:00
    w00dBob: A biped wooden robot made with Arduino Nano #ArduinoD14

    Erik Kramer shared his wooden robot project on Let’s Make Robots III. Adorable and awesome!

    Hello LMRians,

    This is w00dBoB, my attempt at creating a BoB the Biped. I was so impressed with all the printed BoBs on LMR, I felt an irresistible urge to add yet another member to the ever growing army of our small cuboid friends :) Since I don’t have access to a 3D printer I decided to craft my tiny friend from balsa wood: great strength to weight ratio, easy to process and (personal opinion) a lovely natural appearance. However, I was not too confident with getting the leg-angles glued strong enough together to hold the head, so I ordered those from a remote printing service, them turning out to be the most expensive part of the entire rig.

    Read more about the build here.

    NewImage


    NewImage

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:17
    Happy Arduino Day 2014! #ArduinoD14

    Arduino Day  Streaming from  ITP in New York (12-5 pm) with Massimo Banzi and Tom Igoe:

     

    Arduino Day Hangout onAir at Adafruit on a special Saturday night 7pm ET March 29th, 2014 LIVE show!

     

    Click and find the Arduino Day event near you on the Map.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:01
    Energy-Saving Fireplace Thermostat

    [Andrian] has a boiler stove that heats water and sends it to a radiator. As the fireplace heats the water in a boiler a temperature sensor opens the a valve to send the warm water to the radiator. The radiator sends its cool water back to the boiler to be reheated. The valve is slow, so before the boiler can send all the water to the radiator, it’s getting cool water back causing the valve to close while the heat is built back up. To prevent the valve from working so hard and wasting energy, [Andrian] designed a better thermostat to control the valve operation.

    The thermostat uses one LM85 temperature sensor to check the water in the boiler and another one for the ambient temperature. Once the boiler water reaches the desired temperature, the valve is opened via relay. The system waits for half an hour and then checks the boiler temperature again. The brains of this operation is an ATMega168 with a 32.768kHz crystal as the RTC. Code and PCB files are available in his repo.

    We love to see these types of hacks that challenge the status quo and increase the efficiency of appliances. We applaud you, [Andrian], for turning your dissatisfaction into a positive plan of action and for sharing your experience with the rest of us!

    If you want to up the eco-friendliness of heating water a bit, you could heat the water with a compost heap.

    Filed under: green hacks, home hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:00
    Toa Mata Band: World’s first LEGO band #ArduinoD14

    Music producer Giuseppe Acito built a LEGO band out of Bionicle pieces, which are controlled by an Arduino Uno. Sit back, relax and listen to the smooth beats of the Toa Mata Band. via gizmag.

    Each “member” of the band is constructed from LEGO Bionicle pieces rigged with rubber bands and pulleys. Their arms are controlled by an Arduino Uno connected to an iPad running Nord Beat, a MIDI sequencer app. The tiny bots essentially perform a MIDI sequence by hitting the instrument they’re facing when prompted.

    So far, Acito has used a range of different synthesizers and drum machines, including some vintage equipment. The way the bots are set up, they can perform a pre-programmed song or play live with a human operator adding commands to the MIDI sequence in real-time.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 08:00
    How To Make Your Sneakers Into Music Makers #ArduinoD14

    How To Make Musical MIDI Shoes via thobson

    Like many people, I often find myself unconsciously tapping my feet, whether it’s along to a song or out of some nervous habit. As fun as that is though, I’ve always felt as if something has been missing. If only I could trigger the sounds of say, a rabid pack of furious jungle beasts instead of those boring old toe taps. Or, you know, drum sounds or something. I guess that’s cool too.

    Well, now my dreams have been realized! In this “tutorial” I’ll show you how to go about making a pair of awesome musical shoes.

    NewImage

    See Full Tutorial


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 07:00
    This Vending Machine is Now Cyborg Friendly #ArduinoD14

    With the help of an Adadfruit RFID/NFC Shield, this ATM no longer requires credit cards, from hackaday.

    Don’t you hate having to pull out your wallet or cellphone in order to pay for something? What if you could just wave your hand and transfer money that way? Well [David] did, so he decided to do something about it. He made the vending machine in his hackerspace, FamiLAB, cyborg friendly.

    The problem was, the vending machine wasn’t technically his to play around with… so he had to do this hack without actually modifying the machine itself — which we admit, actually makes it quite a bit more interesting!

    But first, why is [David] even doing this? Is he a cyborg or something? Well, not quite, but he’s quite enthusiastic about bio-tech (is that what we call it now?) — anyway, he has NFC implants in his hand, and magnets in his fingertips to give him a sixth “electro-sense”. Wanting to take the most advantage of these augmented abilities, he put together this clever NFC credit card emulator.

    To read his hand, he’s using an Adafruit RFID/NFC Shield stuck on the front of the machine, with an Arduino Mega 2560 to control it. To get around messing with the credit card unit, he’s placed a solenoid next to it, which is close enough that when energized with his information… the credit card machine reads it. Whether or not you like the cyborg action itself, what [David's] put together is pretty incredible. He has detailed instructions and material on GitHub if you’re interested in knowing more.

    Oz6dlvn

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    ID789 LRG

    Adafruit PN532 NFC/RFID Controller Shield for Arduino + Extras: We’ve taken our popular Adafruit PN532 breakout board and turned it into a shield – the perfect tool for any 13.56MHz RFID or NFC application. The Adafruit NFC shield uses the PN532 chip-set (the most popular NFC chip on the market) and is what is embedded in pretty much every phone or device that does NFC. This chipset is very powerful, and can pretty much do it all, such as read and write to tags and cards, communicate with phones (say for payment processing), and ‘act’ like a NFC tag. While the controller has many capabilities, our Arduino library currently only supports reading/writing tags, and does not support phone-to-shield communication, tag emulation (which requires an external ‘secure element’ only available from NXP) or other more advanced features at this time. Read more!



    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 07:00
    Happy Arduino Day!

    alt text

    EDIT: 3/30/2014 Midnight - Arduino Day is over! If you placed a backorder on March 29th then don’t worry about settling your balance right away. We’ll get in touch with you when payment is due! Also, if you contacted Customer Service before the Arduino Day sale ended please be patient and we’ll respond as soon as possible.

    It’s worldwide “Arduino Day” - celebrating Arduino’s 10th birthday! Arduino has been a key player in the DIY movement and has been instrumental in 100s of our projects. To be it succinctly - we’re fans.

    So March 29th we are offering the following boards at a discount price. These discounts run March 29th, 2014, from 12:00:01 a.m. - 11:59:59 p.m. Mountain Time. There is a limit of two units for each product (per order) and back-orders are allowed.

    EDIT: 3/29/2014 3:45am (Mountain Time) - We’ve identified the backorder malfunction and enacted a work-around. Products are back-order-able again! Thank you for bearing with us.

    Distributors - these prices don’t apply to you, but we have a special discount for you (we emailed you a list of your items).

    So on March 29th, here are the deals!

    Arduino Uno was $29.95 now $18

    Arduino Uno SMD was $29.95 now $18

    Arduino Pro 328 3.3V was $14.95 now $6

    Arduino Pro 328 5V was $14.95 now $6

    SparkFun Arduino-Compatible Redboard was $24.95 now $9

    Arduino Pro 5V was $9.95 now $3

    Arduino Pro 3.3V was $9.95 now $3

    We hope this helps you build something amazing! Happy Birthday, Arduino!

    3/29/2014 5:15am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    A Note About Payment For Back-Orders - you don’t have to pay until the goods arrive and are ready to ship!
    See our Payments Information page for details.

    If you are paying with PayPal, and your order has back-ordered items, you may not be redirected to the PayPal site. This is because we do not take payment until your order is ready to ship. Once everything is in stock, we’ll send you a money request.

    3:45am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    We’ve identified the malfunction and enacted a work-around. Products are back-order-able again. Thank you for bearing with us.

    1:15am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    We realize the malfunction with the backorder system. We apologize for the added frustration and the unhappy surprise. Thank you for your patience.

    comments | comment feed

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:01
    Successful 3D Printed Cranium Implant

    implant-1

    What an age we live in. If the image above looks like the entire top of a skull — it’s because it is. Surgeons successfully replaced a 22 year old woman’s cranium with this plastic copy.

    We’ve seen small 3D printed transplants before, but nothing as big as this. A 22 year old woman suffered from a very rare disorder in which her skull never stopped growing. While normal skulls are about 1.5cm thick, hers was almost 5cm thick by the time of the surgery. If they left it any longer, the continued bone growth would have eventually killed her.

    Until now this surgery has required a hand-made concrete-like implant to replace the removed bone. As you can imagine, it’s hardly an ideal solution. Thanks to continually advancing 3D printing technology, surgeons at the University of Utrecht UMC were able to create an exact copy in a durable and lightweight clear plastic, which also has a better rate of brain function recovery than the old way of doing it.

    The 23 hour surgery took place last December and was a huge success with the patient making a full recovery — if you’re not too squeamish around exposed brains, check out the following video. Wow.

    [Thanks Kyle!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:00
    Building the SOLARbot: A 18 month journey as a Maker #ArduinoD14

    Pasted Image 3 27 14 8 12 PM

    SOLARbot, shared on Polyideas.com.

    As a quick introduction, this is a project to build an open-source 2-axis solar tracker, named the Solar Outdoor Lightweight Adjustable Robot, or SOLARbot.  The goal is to maximize the efficiency and portability of a single large solar panel to make it portable for use in emergencies, developing countries, or even camping.  I’ve listed out several different aspects of the build below….

    Github is where you will find all of my plans and wiring schematics, etc. Code optimization and fixes are always welcome!

    Adafruit Forums – These forums have been an excellent source of support- if you are experimenting with the Adafruit GPS module, I encourage you to check out their learning page and the support forums for that device. They have many different subforums for all their products.

    Read More.

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 6 49 PM

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 6 49 PM

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 6 50 PM


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog  as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:00
    What’s the big deal behind this week’s famous Physics discovery? #SaturdayMorningCartoons

    NewImage

    What’s the big deal behind this week’s famous Physics discovery? via Jon Kaufman & Jorge Cham

    Jon Kaufman (soon to be Dr. Jon Kaufman) is a member of the BICEP2 team that made the discovery described above. As one of the Ph.D. students in the project, Jon spent many months in the South Pole (there is an actual pole), recharging the liquid Helium on the telescope, for which he received a medal. It was his idea to draw this comic.

    Read more

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 05:00
    Today is Arduino Day 2014! Get ready for 24 hours of Arduino Posts and a LIVE show featuring @mbanzi #ArduinoD14

    Celebrate Arduino Day ArduinoD14 adafruit with Massimo Banzi mbanzi a special 7pm ET ASK AN ENGINEER LIVE SHOW adafruit industries blog

    Today is Arduino Day 2014! We’ll be posting all day about Arduino projects, products, tutorials, and more. Don’t forget to tune in here at 7 PM EST for our very special LIVE show featuring Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino! Happy 10th Birthday Arduino!

    To get things started here’s one of Adafruit’s most popular tutorials on how to use an LCD Display with your Arduino.

    NewImage

    In this lesson, you will learn how to wire up and use an alphanumeric LCD display.

    The display has an LED backlight and can display two rows with up to 16 characters on each row. You can see the rectangles for each character on the display and the pixels that make up each character. The display is just white on blue and is intended for showing text.

    See the full tutorial here.

    Featured in this Guide:

    • Standard LCD 16×2 + extras
    • Premium Male/Male Jumper Wires – 40 x 6 (150mm)
    • Half-size breadboard
    • Arduino Uno R3 (Atmega328 – assembled)

    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 05:00
    A Polarizing Discovery About the Big Bang! #SaturdayMorningCartoons

    A Polarizing Discovery About the Big Bang! by Minute Physics

    Read more

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 03:01
    The Amazing Ping-Pong Robot was Fake

    1410807_604931006219988_1262071862_o-b0ecffff1f3b82b5

    Well — you guys were right. As it turns out, it was actually a pair of animators who fooled the internet.

    Not sure what we’re talking about? Last month, the [Kuka Robot Group] put out a highly polished video showing an industrial robot playing table tennis against the apparent world champion of the sport — it was extremely well done and entertaining to watch, but unfortunately… also fake. Weeks after the first [Kuka] video came out, someone named [Ulf Hoffmann] released another video, a small table tennis playing robot that looked almost feasible.

    As some of our readers pointed out:

    The movements seemed unnatural for the size of the servos and arm structure. ~ James

    CGI. As others have pointed out, the shadow of the arm disappears when the robot is show from the side, even though they were added in the other shots. ~ Brandon

    My cgi tip off was the cable under the table. It stretches instead of sliding around. ~ Aj

    Notice it’s running Outlook Express and Internet Explorer – no self respecting hacker/maker would run those apps – lol. ~ vonskippy

    And a GIF showing a CGI hiccup… how disappointing! Anyway — the truth has come out as reported by [Philip Steffan] of c’t Hacks. As it turns out, not even [Ulf Hoffman] is real. The elaborate fake was concocted by a pair of animators, [Tobias Becker] and [Steffen Tron] — And you know what, we’re pretty impressed.

    The pair is planning to start up an agency this year for making viral ad campaigns — [Ulf] was an experiment to see how they could do. To make it as realistic as possible, they created the maker and even started documenting the project last year to add some realism to it. Unfortunately, when the [Kuka] robot video came out they had to hurry up and publish something to ride the coat tails of success.

    And for those of you wondering how they actually did it, well, you were all right — completely CGI. [Steffan] was standing behind the table hitting the ball —  they just erased him and animated in a robot. As for the off-putting “servo” noises? They were actually made by turning a Märklin model train engine by hand.

    [Thanks Philip!]

    Filed under: robots hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 01:05
    10 Top DIY Photo Hacks

    volume-38-top-photo-hacksHere are 10 of the cleverest, most inspiring, and most useful maker-photographer projects.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 00:33
    Building Up to Maker Faire, Shawn Thorsson Brings ED-209 to Life: Part 3

    ed209-18To make a giant robot, you have to break the mold. But first you have to make the mold.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 00:00
    Rock Out With Your Ribbon Controller Bass

    Ribbon-Bass

    [Brendan Byrne] stripped this instrument down to basics and built himself a ribbon controller bass guitar. Details are still a bit sparse  on his website, but there are plenty of detailed pictures on his flickr stream. [Brendan] built his bass as part the Future of Guitar Design Course at Parsons the New School for Design. His goal was to create an experience in which playing the instrument and altering parameters of effects are triggered by the same gestures. He’s definitely succeeded in that effort.

    Basically, the bass is a four channel ribbon controller. The frets were removed to make way for four graphite strips. [Brendan] followed [Iain's] excellent tutorial to create his own graphite strips using soft artist’s pencils. The ribbons essentially become potentiometers, which are then read by a teensy. [Brendan] expanded the instrument’s sonic palette by adding several buttons and potentiometers mapped to MIDI control codes. He even included a triple axis accelerometer so every movement of the bass can be mapped. The MIDI data is sent to a PC running commercial music software. Analog sound comes from a piezo pickup placed under the bridge of the bass.

    The results are pretty awesome. While we can’t say [Brendan's] demo was music to our ears, we definitely see the musical possibilities of this kind of instrument.

    [Thanks JohnS_AZ!]

    Filed under: musical hacks

  • Friday, March 28, 2014 - 22:30
    Sci-Fi Contest Prize Aquisition Issues — Oh Noes!

    sci-fi-contest-prize-woes

    We spent quite a bit of time picking out prizes for the Sci-Fi contest. But wouldn’t you know it, literally the day after announcing the contest we cued up The Amp Hour and heard about a worldwide stock shortage (34:00) of BeagleBone Black boards. About a week later Adafruit ran an explanation of the issues. It became clear why we were having issues sources a quintet of boards so that we could deliver on our prize offer.

    To further compound problems we a somewhat smaller issue sourcing Spark Core boards. We put in an order for a quintet of them when we posted the contest; at the time they were supposed to be shipping in late March, but now shipping estimates have been delayed to mid-April. Assuming no more delays these should be available by the time the contest ends at the end of April so keep your fingers crossed.

    We have a good relationship with the folks over at Spark Core and can probably ask them to help us out if we do get in a bind. But we don’t think anyone is going to be able to deliver the BeagleBone Black boards (which we have on backorder) in time for the end of the contest. So here’s the deal: if you win and really want these exact boards in the prize package you select, we’re going to do what needs to be done to get it for you, eventually. If you don’t want to wait and there is a suitable alternative we’ll make that happen.

    We wondered what people are doing if they don’t want to wait out these shortages. Are there any other open-hardware projects that are similar in price and functionality? Our gut says no (that’s why they’re in such high demand). But we’d love to hear about some alternatives. Let us know by leaving a comment below.

    Filed under: contests

  • Friday, March 28, 2014 - 22:30
    Sci-Fi Contest Prize Acquisition Issues — Oh Noes!

    sci-fi-contest-prize-woes

    We spent quite a bit of time picking out prizes for the Sci-Fi contest. But wouldn’t you know it, literally the day after announcing the contest we cued up The Amp Hour and heard about a worldwide stock shortage (34:00) of BeagleBone Black boards. About a week later Adafruit ran an explanation of the issues. It became clear why we were having issues sources a quintet of boards so that we could deliver on our prize offer.

    To further compound problems we a somewhat smaller issue sourcing Spark Core boards. We put in an order for a quintet of them when we posted the contest; at the time they were supposed to be shipping in late March, but now shipping estimates have been delayed to mid-April. Assuming no more delays these should be available by the time the contest ends at the end of April so keep your fingers crossed.

    We have a good relationship with the folks over at Spark Core and can probably ask them to help us out if we do get in a bind. But we don’t think anyone is going to be able to deliver the BeagleBone Black boards (which we have on backorder) in time for the end of the contest. So here’s the deal: if you win and really want these exact boards in the prize package you select, we’re going to do what needs to be done to get it for you, eventually. If you don’t want to wait and there is a suitable alternative we’ll make that happen.

    We wondered what people are doing if they don’t want to wait out these shortages. Are there any other open-hardware projects that are similar in price and functionality? Our gut says no (that’s why they’re in such high demand). But we’d love to hear about some alternatives. Let us know by leaving a comment below.

    Filed under: contests

  • Friday, March 28, 2014 - 22:00
    Adafruit Chocolate Raspberry Pie Cobbler #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi

    NewImage

    Instructables user caitlinsdad made this awesome (and delicious looking) Adafruit Raspberry Pi Cobbler. We can’t wait to try out this recipe!

    No reflow oven needed.

    Make this hackable open source pudding pie.

    Chocolate pudding, Cool Whip dessert topping, cocoa powder, Raspberry preserves, and a chocolate/vanilla sandwich cookie crust.

    This pie has a flavor reminiscent of those fabulous Jell Ring chocolates.

    Make your own pie plate.

    DISCLAIMER: I do not think adafruits are sold at Whole Foods, not that I can afford to shop there anyway.

    See the full recipe here!

Pages