Empty

Total: 0,00 €

h:D

Planet

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 18:58
    BA662 Clone


    Ba662 6
    BA662 Clone in stock! @ Open Music Labs.

    It is said that the future is just pieces of the past stitched together, and so it is with the BA662. We reverse engineered the now-obsolete amplifier so you can stitch it into your projects, and give them a new future. Whether fixing an old synth or building a new filter with a distinct sound, the BA662 Clone can be your time machine. Why should Dr. Who have all the fun?

    Read more.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 18:00
    ATTiny85 Arc Reactor Project


    Finished perfboard in case

    Zack shared with us his simple ATTiny85 Arc Reactor project:

    Something I was making for Halloween. It has a potentiometer that you turn to switch the mode of the LEDs from flicker, pules, or solid. I used an arduino to program the ATTiny85. Ones I finished it I ended up giving it to a friend so I am not 100% sure on the capacitors. Anything close to 450uF should be fine and depending on the power supply you may not need them at all.

    Part List:

    • 2 resisters (10 Ohms hook to LEDs and 470 Ohms hooked to potentiometer)
    • 10k Ohm Potentiometer
    • LM7805C 5 volt regulator
    • 2 small Capacitors (I think I used 450uF)
    • ATTiny85 and 8-Pin IC socket
    • PC Board terminal
    • 8 white LEDs
    • Round ProtoBoard

    Read More.

    Back of perfboard

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 17:44
    Join Us at Mini Maker Faire Denver

    alt text

    Denver’s first-ever Maker Faire will take place on May 3rd & 4th, 2014 at the National Western Complex - and SparkFun will be there! We’ll be teaching beginning soldering at our world famous-ish soldering booth - we hope you can join us!

    alt text

    Our soldering booth in action.

    As a friend of Sparkfun, you can get $1.00 off all tickets by using the promo code “Sparkfun” when you check out! You’ll be amazed by a wide range of interactive makers such as sculpture games, a sound puddle, robotics, rockets, blacksmithing, a fire breathing dragon and more! Check out the Denver Maker Faire page to learn more and purchase tickets!

    We hope we’ll see you there!

    comments | comment feed

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 17:00
    Interview with Susan Kare, the woman behind Apple’s first icons and pixel art pioneer


    NewImage

    Priceonomics has an inspiring interview with Susan Kare, creator of the first Apple icons and pioneer of pixel art.

    Thirty years ago, as tech titans battled for real estate in the personal computer market, an inconspicuous young artist gave the Macintosh a smile.

    Susan Kare “was the type of kid who always loved art.” As a child, she lost herself in drawings, paintings, and crafts; as a young woman, she dove into art history and dreamed of being a world-renowned fine artist.

    But when a chance encounter in 1982 reconnected her with an old friend and Apple employee, Kare found herself working in a different medium, with a much smaller canvas — about 1,024 pixels. Equipped with few computer skills and lacking any prior experience with digital design, Kare proceeded to revolutionize pixel art.

    For many, Susan Kare’s icons were a first taste of human-computer interaction: they were approachable, friendly, and simple, much like the designer herself. Today, we recognize the little images — system-failure bomb, paintbrush, mini-stopwatch, dogcow — as old, pixelated friends.

    But Kare, who has subsequently done design work for Microsoft, Facebook, and Paypal, has also become her own icon, immortalized in the annals of pixel art. We had a chance to interview her; this is her story.

    Check out this vintage Macintosh commercial from 1983 featuring Susan!

    “My philosophy has not really changed — I really try to develop symbols that are meaningful and memorable. I started designing monochrome icons using a 32 x 32 pixel icon editor that Andy Hertzfeld created. Subsequently I’ve been able to take advantage of more robust tools and higher screen resolution, and also design vector images in Illustrator. But design problems are solved by thinking about context and metaphor — not by tools.”

    “The end goal is to develop an image that is easy to understand and remember, and that works well in its screen environment. It’s always optimal to be able to see the whole visual UI and mock up how icons will fit into that, and iterate.”

    There’s a ton more to the interview, including pictures of Susan’s notebooks that show her original ideas for classic icons! Check it out here.

    NewImage

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 17:00
    Interplanetary Makers: NASA Needs Your Input!

    Screen Shot 2014-04-06 at 10.19.31 PMPut your CubeSat into lunar orbit and see if it can send back data from the farthest reaches of space.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 16:36
    Raspberry Pi Unveils Tiny New “Compute Module”

    CM_and_pi-smallNew hardware from the Raspberry Pi Foundation lets anyone incorporate the brains of a Pi into their own circuit boards.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 16:36
    Raspberry Pi Unveils Tiny New Compute Module

    CM_and_pi-smallNew hardware from the Raspberry Pi Foundation lets anyone incorporate the brains of a Pi into their own circuit boards.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 16:01
    Multijoy_Retro Connects Your ‘Wayback’ to your ‘Machine’

    flight-finished

    Moore’s law is the observation that, over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles approximately every two years. This rapid advancement is certainly great for computing power and the advent of better technology but it does have one drawback; otherwise great working hardware becomes outdated and unusable.  [Dave] likes his flight simulators and his old flight sim equipment. The only problem is that his new-fangled computer doesn’t have DA15 or DE9 inputs to interface with his controllers. Not being one to let something like this get him down, [Dave] set out to build his own microcontroller-based interface module. He calls it the Multijoy_Retro.

    The plan was to make it possible for multiple controllers with DA15 and DE9 connectors to interface with a modern PC via USB. After comparing the available Arduino-compatible boards, the Teensy++ 2.0 was chosen due to the fact it can be easily configured as a USB Human Input Device. Other benefits are its small size and substantial quantity of input pins. The project’s custom firmware sketch reads the inputs from the connected controllers and then sends the converted commands to the PC as an emulated USB controller.

    Four hundred solder points were required to support all of the desired functionality. Each function was tested as its hardware counterpart was completed. Problems were troubleshot at that time, then labels added to the wires. This method was necessary to keep everything neat and manageable. This whole process took several days to complete.

    flight-inside

    The enclosure is mostly 3D printed. Clear acrylic was used for the front panel which was made to look similar to controls you would expect to find in cockpits of old military aircraft. To ensure accurate and uniform connector-shaped holes a CNC Router was used to cut out the front panel. Labels were printed on a regular printer, cut out and attached to the back side of the clear acrylic.

    Overall, this is a great build. The project covers many aspects; reverse engineering, electronics, programming, 3D printing and CNC machining. Not only does it solve a problem, it also looks good while doing it!

     

    Filed under: peripherals hacks

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 16:00
    The strange stories behind the year’s best scientific images #science #photography


    NewImage19

    io9 has posted the winners of this year’s Wellcome Image awards and the results are pretty cool. Above is one of the winning entries- a close up of a kidney stone.

    Researchers Kevin Mackenzie, Sergio Bertazzo and Zeynep Saygin all had winning entries in the 2014 Wellcome Image Awards, an annual competition dedicated to showcasing the year’s most fascinating scientific images. Here, in their own words, is how they captured their subjects, and what their images reveal.

    Widening our view of the world can mean taking a much closer look at the familiar. Technology from MRI to Scanning Electron Microscopes, which use focused beams to interact with a sample’s surface to produce nano-sized resolution, is allowing scientists and medical researchers to delve into our strange and beautiful world (sometimes aided with a little Photoshop).

    NewImage20

    Seen above is a Scanning Electron Micrograph of a single head louse egg attached to a human hair.

    NewImage21

    This one depicts adult brain nerve fibres. Zeynep Saygin explains:

    My image depicts the nerve fibres, or wiring, of the healthy human brain. Brain cells communicate with each other through these fibres and we can visualise them in every individual using a specialised MRI scan. The colours represent the direction of the fibres: blue for those that travel up and down; green for front to back; and red for left to right.

    NewImage22

    This is a density-dependent colour scanning electron micrograph of the surface of human heart (aortic valve) tissue. The spherical particles show calcification. The orange colour identifies denser material (calcified material composed of calcium phosphate), while structures that appear in green are less dense (corresponding to the organic component of the tissue).

    The discovery of calcified particles shows that calcification in the cardiovascular system is more complex than being just a regular process of bone formation.

    See the best runners up over at the io9 site.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 15:00
    Wanna Build a Rocket? NASA’s About to Give Away a Mountain of Its Code


    nasa-launch-660x528

    This Thursday, NASA will release an extensive software catalogue to the public as a part of the government’s push towards transparency, via Wired:

    This NASA software catalog will list more than 1,000 projects, and it will show you how to actually obtain the code you want. The idea to help hackers and entrepreneurs push these ideas in new directions — and help them dream up new ideas. Some code is only available to certain people — the rocket guidance system, for instance — but if you can get it, you can use it without paying royalties or copyright fees. Within a few weeks of publishing the list, NASA says, it will also offer a searchable database of projects, and then, by next year, it will host the actual software code in its own online repository, a kind of GitHub for astronauts.

    It’s all part of a White House-directed push to open up the federal government, which is the country’s largest creator of public domain code, but also a complete laggard when it comes to sharing software. Three years ago, President Obama ordered federal agencies to speed up tech transfer programs like this. And while the feds have been slow, the presidential directive is starting to bear fruit. In February, DARPA published a similar catalog, making it easier for entrepreneurs to get ahold of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s code too.

    NASA has run a technology transfer program for over 50 years. It has given us everything from the Dustbuster to Giro bicycle helmets to “space rose,” a unique perfume scent forged in zero-Gs. But it’s high time the agency actively pushed out its software code as well. Increasingly, NASA’s research and development dollars are paying for software, says Daniel Lockney, Technology Transfer Program Executive with NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist. “About a third of everything we invent ends up being software these days,” he says.

    Already, NASA software has been used to do some pretty amazing stuff outside the agency. In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope’s star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands. “Our design software has been used to make everything from guitars to roller coasters to Cadillacs,” Lockney says. “Scheduling software that keeps the Hubble Space Telescope operations straight has been used for scheduling MRIs at busy hospitals and as control algorithms for online dating services.”

    Read more.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 15:00
    How To Make an Amazing Spider-Man Costume



    The Amazing Spider-Man 2 will be here soon, and if you’re thinking about making a Spidey costume of your very own, YouTuber Crazydog500 has three how-to videos to help you put one together. You have to obtain the pattern yourself and get it printed, and then Crazydog goes through the step by step of making the mask and attaching shoes for a seamless look. The end result is a costume that looks a lot like what you see on the screen, and even if you’re not planning to dress like Spider-Man, it’s a good overview for different techniques.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 14:37
    BREAKING NEWS! Raspberry Pi Compute Module – Pi on a DIMM! @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi


    Untitled-2

    Cm+Io-Small

    Raspberry Pi Compute Module: new product! | Raspberry Pi.

    The compute module contains the guts of a Raspberry Pi (the BCM2835 processor and 512Mbyte of RAM) as well as a 4Gbyte eMMC Flash device (which is the equivalent of the SD card in the Pi). This is all integrated on to a small 67.6x30mm board which fits into a standard DDR2 SODIMM connector (the same type of connector as used for laptop memory*). The Flash memory is connected directly to the processor on the board, but the remaining processor interfaces are available to the user via the connector pins. You get the full flexibility of the BCM2835 SoC (which means that many more GPIOs and interfaces are available as compared to the Raspberry Pi), and designing the module into a custom system should be relatively straightforward as we’ve put all the tricky bits onto the module itself.

    Read more! Schematic here!

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 14:00
    The Pressure Suit Chronicles

    Cameron M. Smith of Pacific Spaceflight / Copenhagen Suborbitals in the Mark I 'Gagarin' Pressure Garment. Photo: Jev Olsen, Copenhagen Suborbitals.Meet the man who's building — and testing — his own pressurized space suit.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 14:00
    NeoPixel-Thermo-Hygrometer Displays A Room’s Temperature and Humidity #NeoPixel #Adafruit


    NeoPixel Thermo Hygrometer

    Christian Bastel-Leben shared with us a unique project he built around Adafruit NeoPixel strips, saying: “I build a cool looking device that displays the temperature and humidity in a room with the help of your great NeoPixels! Thank you for the product and especially for the library!” Check out project documentation at his site here:

    The NeoPixel-thermo-hygrometer is ready! Cornelius was milled with a beautiful body, the front panel is made ​​of TrueLED Plexiglas (black).  The thermo-hygrometer shows on the right scale, the temperature of 10-40 ° C and on the left the relative humidity from 0-100% of .

    The respective delicate dark green dots indicate the boundaries within which the indoor climate is perceived as pleasant.

    A Minty (inspired by Adafruit’s Menta) controls on the database of a HYT939 a NeoPixel strip from Adafruit.

    [Below] Here I sprayed the sensor with cooling spray: the center point for temperature is slumped down and then changes to blue, the point for the relative humidity is fired up and has this changed to red.  The thermo-hygrometer is reminiscent of something between a DNA image and a LCARS display and looks very cool!

    Read More.

    NeoPixel Thermo Hygrometer03

    NeoPixel Thermo Hygrometer02

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 13:01
    3D Printed Camera Arm Saves $143

    arm04

    Professional camera equipment is notoriously expensive, so when [Raster's] LCD camera arm for his RED ONE Digital Cinema Camera broke, he was dismayed to find out a new one would run him back $150! He decide to take matters into his own hands and make this one instead.

    The original arm lasted a good 4 years before finally braking — but unfortunately, it’s not very fixable. Luckily, [Raster] has a 3D printer! The beauty with most camera gear is it’s all 1/4-20 nuts and bolts, making DIY accessories very easy to cobble together. He fired up OpenSCAD and started designing various connector blocks for the 1/4-20 hardware to connect to. His first prototype worked but there was lots of room for improvement for the second iteration.  He’s continued refining it into a more durable arm seen here. For $7 of material — it’s a pretty slick system!

    Between making 3D printed digital camera battery adapters,  3D printed camera mounts for aerial photography, affordable steady-cams, or even a fully 3D printed camera… getting a 3D printer if you’re a photography enthusiast seems to make a lot of sense!

     

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 13:00
    How a medieval philosopher dreamed up the ‘multiverse’


    NewImage16

    Space.com has an interesting read on how space was viewed in the Middle Ages.

    The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this “multiverse” concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.

    When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse…

    In De Luce, Grosseteste assumed that the universe was born from an explosion that pushed everything, matter and light, out from a single point — an idea that is strikingly similar to the modern Big Bang theory.

    At first, wrote the philosopher, matter and light were linked together. But the rapid expansion eventually led to a “perfect state,” with light-matter crystallizing and forming the outermost sphere — the so-called “firmament” — of the medieval cosmos.

    The crystalized matter, Grosseteste assumed, also radiated a special kind of light, which he called lumen. It radiated inward, gathering up the “imperfect” matter it encountered and piling it up in front, similar to the way shock waves propagate in a supernova explosion.

    This left behind “perfect” matter that crystallized into another sphere, embedded within the first and also radiating lumen. Eventually, in the center, the remaining imperfect matter formed the core of all the spheres — the Earth…

    And although De Luce never mentions the term “multiverse,” Bower said that Grosseteste “seems to realize that the model does not predict a unique solution, and that there are many possible outcomes. He needs to pick out one universe from all the possibilities.”

    “Robert Grosseteste works in a very similar way to a modern cosmologist, suggesting physical laws based on observations of the world around him, and he then uses these laws to understand how the universe formed,” Bower said.

    Read more.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 12:02
    The gloves that will “change the way we make music”



    …musician Imogen Heap demonstrates the electronic gloves that allow people to interact with their computer remotely via hand gestures.

    The interview was filmed at Heap’s home studio outside London, shortly before she launched her Kickstarter campaign to produce a limited production run of the open-source Mi.Mu gloves.

    “These beautiful gloves help me gesturally interact with my computer,” says Heap, explaining how the wearable technology allows her to perform without having to interact with keyboards or control panels.

    Pushing buttons and twiddling dials “is not very exciting for me or the audience,” she says. “[Now] I can make music on the move, in the flow and more humanly, [and] more naturally engage with my computer software and technology.”

    Learn more.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 12:00
    These MIT Researchers Want to Turn GIFs Into a Language


    Screen-Shot-2014-04-01-at-3.44.19-PM

    Two MIT Media Lab Grad students, Travis Rich and Kevin Hu, started GIFGIF, an interactive site that aims to measure and understand the potential of GIFs as web language. Click through to participate! via The Atlantic.

    “We were talking about GIFs one day,” Hu told Quartz, “and we realized that they’re becoming more and more serious of a medium. They’re more popular, they’re used for more things.” Buzzfeed, for example, recently used GIFs to explain what was going on in Ukraine—reaching an audience that otherwise might have ignored the news. “And we realized,” Hu said, “that we could quantify this usage.”

    The site, where visitors pick which of two GIFs relates better to a particular emotion, is powered by another MIT Media Lab project’s platform. Place Pulse used the multiple-choice A/B voting system to assign emotions to pictures of different cities, allowing researchers to quantify, for example, how “sad” or “unsafe” people felt when looking at pictures of Rio de Janeiro.

    But Rich and Hu, who worked on separate teams but sat near each other (and the Place Pulse group) in the lab, decided to harness the system for their own purposes, to create a visual database of emotion. “It’s the same idea,” Rich said. “Taking something that’s very easy for humans to read—emotion—and translating it for computers.” While humans have no trouble deciphering what a GIF “means,” the same task is impossible for a computer.

    Since launching on March 3, the site has drawn an average of 15,000 users a day who vote around 10 times per visit. “The average time is increasing already,” Hu said, “so we’re pretty optimistic for the future.” Their first goal is to build a text-to-GIF translator. “I want people to be able to put in a Shakespearian sonnet and get out a GIF set,” Hu said. But once they’ve gotten qualitative metrics for a large number of GIFs, they think the possibilities are pretty endless. “You could reverse-engineer it and use a GIF to find a movie that fits a certain mood,” Rich said.

    Read more.

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 11:00
    NYC Resistor Members Collaborate with Brooklyn Ballet On Current Season #neopixel


    SparkleSkirt

    Members of the NYC Resistor hackerspace shared with us about their latest project — which features Adafruit NeoPixels, GEMMAs, and more! — currently on view at the Brooklyn Ballet! (Grab tickets here!)

    NYC Resistor Members Collaborate with Brooklyn Ballet On Current Season:

    Nick and Sayaka Vermeer, Olivia Barr, and William Ward have been working hard for the past couple weeks on an exciting project with the Brooklyn Ballet. We are transforming the dancers’ costumes into interactive performance pieces. Our contribution consists of six LED snowfall tutus for the ballerinas, one Pexel shirt for Mike “Supreme” Fields and six sparkling LED hair accessories for the young ballerinas. The dancers will be performing the snow scene from the Nutcracker in the Brooklyn Ballet’s Vectors, Marys, and Snow performance from April 3rd to April 13th.

    …[See the video below from their crowdfunding initiative] to watch an interview with Nick and Lynn Parkerson, founding artistic director and choreographer of Brooklyn Ballet. We’d really appreciate your donation to further our work! All our hardware designs and code are open source, and we hope to see more creative works mixing technology and dance.

    Snowfall Tutus: To accomplish the snowfall/glitter efffect we’ve added LED lights, motion sensors, and custom coded/fabricated microcontrollers to the tutus. The sensor we used is called an accelerometer and its placed at the waist of the corset. It reacts with with movement of the dancer by increasing the amount and brightness of the LEDs with more vigorous movement from the dancer. Nick found a remarkably strong ultra flex 36 gauge silicone wire thats perfect for the supple construction of the tutus and its become a standard material at NYC Resistor for wearables. The wire connects 24 neopixels that are broken down into 6 strands of 4 pixels in each tutu. Special thanks to Max Henstell and Adam Mayer for helping in production. Take a look at this amazing video of our twinkling Tutu!

    Pexel Shirt: Pexel Shirt is custom made for the dancer Mike “Supreme” Fields and is designed to interact with his pecks and arms. Mike is a popping artist and his dancing incorporates the flexing of muscle groups to create surface movement on his body. The shirt is activated by individual accelerometer sensors placed over his muscles that illuminate the LEDs through a Flora microcontroller. There are four sensors total, one on each peck and each wrist. When he flexes an individual peck it lights up. The lights on his arms are controlled by moving his wrists up/down or right/left. The entire piece is hand sewn including stitches in between individual pixel on the arm strands for optimum elasticity while still being secure. Watch the Mike in action here: Mike “Supreme” Fields.

    Sparkle Hair Clips: To accent the young ballerina’s costume we designed an LED accent on a hair clip. The clip uses a Gemma microcontroller and a strand of neopixels. The clear acrylic beads on the clip filter the LEDs and sparkle.

    Please come out and see the show at the Brooklyn Ballet April 3rd – 13th.

    Read More.

    Pexelshirt

  • Monday, April 7, 2014 - 10:01
    Hack A Day Goes Retro in a Computer Museum

    vt100_HAD Our friends over at Hack42 in the Netherlands decided to have some fun with their computer museum. So far, they’ve been able to display the Hack a Day retro site on three classic computers — including an Apple Lisa, a DEC GIGI, and a run of the mill DEC VT100. We had the opportunity to visit Hack42 last October during our Hackerspacing in Europe trip – but just as a refresher if you don’t remember, Hack42 is in Arnhem, in the Netherlands — just outside of Germany. The compound was built in 1942 as a German military base, disguised as a bunch of farmhouses. It is now home to Hack42, artist studios, and other random businesses. The neat thing is, its location is still blurred out on Google Maps! Needless to say, their hackerspace has lots of space. Seriously. So much so they have their own computer museum! Which is why they’ve decided to have some fun with them… To get Hack a Day Retro on these old computers they are using an old Debian Compaq machine as the host computer for the DECServer90m. The DECServer90m is a remote serial port server with 8 configurable serial ports. It’s used as a terminal server for VAX, nicorVAX or other similar computers. It connects using coax Ethernet to be configured. The serial ports can be setup for printers, modems, or in this case, dumb terminals like the DEC VT100, or an Apple Lisa.

    Lisa-HAD

    An Apple Lisa

    The Lisa was one of the first systems to use a mouse and a graphical desktop!

    GIGI_HAD

    DEC GIGI

     The DEC GIGI VK100 is a strange beast. Even DEC did’t know what to think of it and couldn’t properly market the machine, thinking it was just a dumb terminal with color support and some extra gizmo’s like basic and graphics. It looks like a over-sized Commodore C64 but it has some nice connectors on the back, like a current-loop (for serial connections to even older computers than a VAX like a PDP8 minicomputer and three BNC connectors for component color output.)

    They’re currently working on an even more complicated method to get some really old computers to display the page!

    Filed under: classic hacks, computer hacks

Pages