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  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 16:23
    Toward Thingiverse.gov?

    Lincoln Mask RenderingUnrestricted 3D scans from Uncle Sam. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has released a memorandum directing federal agencies to develop a plan in the next six months to make their scientific collections publicly available. It's the first step towards creating a central repository of all of the Government’s 3D scans. And the Government has a lot of things to be scanned.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 16:00
    New Project: Pizza Volcano

    139528098861302How to: Combining your favorite science fair project with your favorite food.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 16:00
    From the Adafruit Learning System: 3D Printed Animatronic Robot Head #ArduinoD14

    RickWinscott

    Rick Winscot shared a entry level robotics/animatronics project (for advanced Makers!) build around Arduino code, servos, LEDs and 3D Printing – “3D Printed Animatronic Robot Head“:

    Have you ever wanted to build a robot, but don’t know where to start? Or… are you looking for a project that you can cut-your-teeth on?

    This servo-controlled animatronic robot head uses two servos for movement, two speakers for eyes and an LED mouth for a friendly remote-controlled robot.

    This an advanced project, for people who already know how to control servos and LEDs. This tutorial will focus on the 3D printing and assembly of the ‘bot head!

    Robots, animatronics, and puppets – oh my!

    …You can breathe life into your animatronic creation with a servo controller and a little bit of Arduino code… here are two awesome options.

    Read More.


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    1411

    Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Shield – I2C interface: You want to make a cool Arduino robot, maybe a hexapod walker, or maybe just a piece of art with a lot of moving parts. Or maybe you want to drive a lot of LEDs with precise PWM output. Then you realize that the Arduino has only a few PWM outputs, and maybe those outputs are conflicting with another shield! What now? You could give up OR you could just get our handy PWM and Servo driver shield. It’s just like our popular PWM/Servo Breakout but now Arduino-ready and works with any Arduino that uses shields: Uno, Leo, Mega, ADK, its all good. (read more)


    815

    Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Driver – I2C interface – PCA9685: You want to make a cool robot, maybe a hexapod walker, or maybe just a piece of art with a lot of moving parts. Or maybe you want to drive a lot of LEDs with precise PWM output. Then you realize that your microcontroller has a limited number of PWM outputs! What now? You could give up OR you could just get this handy PWM and Servo driver breakout. When we saw this chip, we quickly realized what an excellent add-on this would be. Using only two pins, control 16 free-running PWM outputs! You can even chain up 62 breakouts to control up to 992 PWM outputs (which we would really like to see since it would be glorious) (read more)

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 15:00
    How to control any circuit with a TV Remote and an Arduino #ArduinoD14

    MAKE made this useful video outlining the process of using an Arduino and your TV remote to control other circuits around the house. The details are posted on Instructables here.

    Most of the buttons on a remote control are never used. So why not use them to control appliances and other electronics around your house. In this project, I am going to show you how to use an Arduino to decode the signal from your remote and use it to make an outlet switch that can turn your electronics on and off.

    When you are done, you will be able to control lights, fans and even your coffee maker with your TV remote.

    See the full tutorial here.


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 15:00
    Cheap Tire Sale Sparks Creative Contraption

    IMG_5541

    [Greg] and his kids were killing time at their (his?) favorite store — Harbor Freight. They noticed a sale on 10″ rubber tires for only $5/each… and it was all down hill from there.

    He started sketching up a general idea for a three-wheeled go-kart. Once he had a reasonable idea of what it would look like, he went down to the hardware store and picked up a whole lot of 1″ PVC pipe, tees, elbows, crosses, epoxy and fasteners.

    It’s a simple cart featuring a bit of a roll cage. Currently it’s just designed for being pushed around or riding down hills. It still looks like a lot of fun for the kids. We can’t help but wonder when he’s going to strap some electric motors on it to make it really fun for the kids. Maybe build a second, put some pool noodles around the frame, and bam, you’ve got a set of bumper-cars! If he needs any inspiration for the electronics, [Greg] could check out this Wireless Wii-Cart, or this over-powered-built-in-a-day-cart.

    [Thanks Andrew]

    Filed under: toy hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 14:00
    Does the band rock? Find out with the Rockterscale #ArduinoD14

    The folks over at Radio 1 Interactive built a device powered by Arduino boards called the Rockterscale that can measure how much a band rocks.

    An idea popped out of Radio 1 Interactive a while ago. This would be a device that measures ‘rock’ – how much the band and the crowd are rocking at a gig – called The Rockterscale. It would display the amount of rock at the venue and on the web in real-time, maybe even showing it at other gigs and encouraging bands and crowds to out-rock each other. But, until now, no-one has really tried building it. But we were due another hardware hacking session so we decided to build the Rockterscale. Two intensive days later we had these…

    First, we have the Hat of Rock which measures the amount of head thrashing. Suitable for both fans and the band.

    Next, the dance floor measures movement and a force sensor hooked up to an improvised crash barrier at the front measures the crowd pushing up to it.

    A webcam mounted on the ceiling measures the overall crowd movement and then there’s the music itself. Audio processing code measures the loudness of the song and the spread of the frequencies in it – a high value would be a “wall of sound” like effect. It also does some beat detection. So we have 6 measurements and an equation…

    Hat + Floor + Crush + Crowd + Loud + Phat = ROCK

    Read more.

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  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 13:00
    From The Adafruit Learning System: Wireless Gardening with Arduino + CC3000 WiFi Modules #ArduinoD14

    NewImage

    Wireless Gardening with Arduino + CC3000 WiFi Modules with Tutorial on our Adafruit Learning System. Created by Marc-Olivier Schwartz

    In this guide, we are going to give a modern touch to gardening and connect some informations about your garden to the Internet. We are going to use a soil moisture & temperature sensor connected to an Arduino and a WiFi chip to automatically send measurements from your garden to the cloud.

    We’ll use a service call Carriots to handle the data and display it nicely on a webpage. Then, an email or SMS alert can be send to you automatically if the moisture falls below a given threshold.
    Don’t worry, you don’t actually need to have a garden or even plants (although we think plants are great to have) to use the content of this article: what you are going to learn can be used for any remote measurement projects. Let’s dive into the project!

    Full Tutorial


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    NewImage

    Arduino Uno R3 (Atmega328 – assembled)

    The new Uno is the latest version after the Duemilanove, with an improved USB interface chip. Like the Duemilanove, it not only has an expanded shield header with a 3.3V reference and a RESET pin (which solves the problem of how to get to the RESET pin in a shield) AND a 500mA fuse to protect your computer’s USB port, but ALSO an automatic circuit to select USB or DC power without a jumper! The Uno is pin and code-compatible with the Duemilanove, Diecimilla and older Arduinos so all your shields, libraries, code will still work. The new R3 (3rd revision) of the UNO has a few minor updates, with an upgrade to the USB interface chip and additional breakouts for the i2c pins and an IORef pin. For more information about the UNO, the R3 and what the updates mean, please check our UNO FAQ!

    (read more)


    NewImage

    Soil Temperature/Moisture Sensor – SHT10

    Take your gardening project to the next level with a SHT-10 based soil sensor. The sensor includes a temperature/humidity sensor module from Sensiron in a sinter metal mesh encasing. The casing is weatherproof and will keep water from seeping into the body of the sensor and damaging it, but allows air to pass through so that it can measure the humidity (moisture) of the soil. It is designed to be submersible in water, but it’s always best to avoid long-term (over 1 hour at a time) submersion, if you need something that can be submerged for over an hour you may want to find a different sensor. It can also be simply placed outside for exterior weather sensing.

    (read more)


    NewImage

    Adafruit CC3000 WiFi Breakout with uFL Connector for Ext Antenna

    The CC3000 hits that sweet spot of usability, price and capability. It uses SPI for communication (not UART!) so you can push data as fast as you want or as slow as you want. It has a proper interrupt system with IRQ pin so you can have asynchronous connections. It supports 802.11b/g, open/WEP/WPA/WPA2 security, TKIP & AES. A built in TCP/IP stack with a “BSD socket” interface. TCP and UDP in both client and server mode, up to 4 concurrent sockets. It does not support “AP” mode, it can connect to an access point but it cannot be an access point.

    We wrapped this little silver module in a tidy breakout board. It has an onboard 3.3V regulator that can handle the 350mA peak current, and a level shifter to allow 3 or 5V logic level. This version of the CC3000 breakout does not have an onboard antenna – instead we placed a standard uFL connector so that an external 2.4GHz antenna can be used. You will need to purchase a uFL to RP-SMA adapter cable and a 2.4GHZ ‘WiFi’ antenna to use! See below for these items. This option can give you better range and makes it easier to enclose in a box. We use the same route and layout as TI’s eval board, however, this module is no longer automatically FCC certified when an external antenna is used.

    (read more)


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 12:01
    Recycling Plastic With Liquid Nitrogen

    Ln2

    Recycling 3D printer filament isn’t a new idea, and in fact there are quite a few devices out there that will take chunks ABS, PLA, or just about any other thermoplastic and turn them into printer filament. The problem comes when someone mentions recycling plastic parts and turning them into filament ready to be used again. Plastics can only be recycled so many times, and there’s also the problem of grinding up your octopodes and companion cubes into something a filament extruder will accept.

    The solution, it appears, is to freeze the plastic parts to be recycled before grinding them up. Chopping up plastic parts at room temperature imparts a lot of energy into the plastic before breaking. Freezing the parts to below their brittle transition temperature means the resulting chips will have clean cuts, something much more amenable to the mechanics of filament extruders.

    The setup for this experiment consisted of cooling PLA plastic with liquid nitrogen and putting the frozen parts in a cheap, As Seen On TV blender. The resulting chips were smaller than the plastic pellets found in injection molding manufacturing plants, but will feed into the extruder well enough.

    Liquid nitrogen might be overkill in this case; the goal is to cool the plastic down below its brittle transition temperature, which for most plastics is about -40° (420° R). Dry ice will do the job just as well, and is also available at most Walmarts.

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 12:00
    How to make a REST API for Arduino & the CC3000 WiFi Chip #ArduinoD14

    Marco Schwartz created this tutorial on how to make a REST API for his Arduino Yun and the CC3000 WiFi chip, from openhomeautomation.

    I was recently playing with the Arduino Yun for a whole set of new projects, and I discovered a sketch that implements a REST API for the Arduino Yun. We’ll see in more details what a REST API is, but for now let’s say it allows to standardise the communication between your Arduino and the external world via WiFi or Ethernet, and develop complex applications without having to modify your Arduino sketch every time.

    So I told myself: why not create one REST API for the CC3000 WiFi chip ? That’s exactly what I did as a weekend project, and I wanted to share it with you. If you want to directly jump to the project files, go over to the GitHub repository of the project.

    So what’s a REST API ?

    You may wonder: what’s a REST API ? It’s actually a concept that is widely used by many web applications like SaaS. REST stands for Representational State Transfer, and is a communication architecture that was created back in 2000. It defines many constraints that the architecture has to follow, the most important features being:

    • A client/server communication: a client sends a request to a server, and the server answers accordingly
    • A stateless communication: every request has to contain all the information so the server can understand it, without having to rely on some information stored on the server
    • A uniform interface to easily identify resources on the server

    This allowed to standardise communication between web applications, and made them more scalable, faster, and simplified the development of more complex applications. Many applications now propose a REST API, for example the eCommerce plugin I am using on this website.

    Why do we need it for Arduino & the CC3000 WiFi chip ?

    The problem that I encountered while developing web applications using the CC3000 is that I had to create a new Arduino sketch for every application, that needs to be coordinated with the rest of the application, for example an interface running on my computer.

    And then, I discovered the REST API of the Arduino Yun. It is a simple sketch for the Arduino Yun that allows to make REST calls directly from your browser. For example:

    http://arduinoyun.local/arduino/digital/8/1

    will put the pin number 8 to a high state on my Arduino Yun. With this REST interface, it’s easy to load a sketch once for all on your Arduino, and then only work on the interface on your computer that makes REST calls on your Arduino board. And for now, this kind of interface was only available on the official Arduino boards, like the WiFi & Ethernet shields, and the Yun.

    But I wanted to have the same on my CC3000 WiFi chip: make a sketch that will create a web server on the Arduino board, and then accept REST commands from an external client, like from an interface running on my computer. With this, I just have to build complex web applications on my computer, and then made them interact with the REST API of my Arduino board. And that’s what I built in this project.

    IMG 7938 small

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Products!


    1498 MED

    Arduino YUN (YÚN ): Arduino Yún is the first member of a new groundbreaking line of wifi products combining the power Linux with ease of use of Arduino. Yún means “cloud” in Chinese language as the purpose of this board is to make it simple to connect to complex web services directly from Arduino. The first Arduino Yún is the combination of a classic Arduino Leonardo (based on the Atmega32U4 processor) with a Wifi system-on-a-chip running Linino (a MIPS GNU/Linux based on OpenWRT). Read more!


    1469 MED

    Adafruit CC3000 WiFi Breakout with Onboard Ceramic Antenna – v1.1: The CC3000 hits that sweet spot of usability, price and capability. It uses SPI for communication (not UART!) so you can push data as fast as you want or as slow as you want. It has a proper interrupt system with IRQ pin so you can have asynchronous connections. It supports 802.11b/g, open/WEP/WPA/WPA2 security, TKIP & AES. A built in TCP/IP stack with a “BSD socket” interface. TCP and UDP in both client and server mode, up to 4 concurrent sockets. It does not support “AP” mode, it can connect to an access point but it cannot be an access point. Read more!


  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:00
    From the Forums: Creating the Dream Aquarium with an Arduino #ArduinoD14

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 12 02 AM


    Creating the Dream Aquarium with an Arduino
    , shared on the Adafruit Forums:

    So, I am throwing my hat into the Arduino total tank build, and I will try and document as much of my journey as possible here. I have tinkered around with the Arduino in the past, but have never attempted anything of this complexity. I have zero real world programming experience, but enjoy reading sites like hackaday, lifehacker, and such. What I’m saying here is that my code will look pathetically amateurish and possibly unreadable if viewed by a professional…

    So, the goals of my personal build will be:

    • Autodosing
    • Keeping track of the fert levels and alarming if they become low (I am rather forgetful and would like a warning)
    • Keeping my light schedule
    • Controlling CO2 solenoid
    • Scheduling an auxiliary RGB strip, as I will shamelessly steal from AnotherHobby Fallen Tree Branch 60cm
    • The aux RGB strip will have sunrise, sunset, and moonlight as AnotherHobby has, ideally
    • Writing all of the alarm times to the DS1307 RAM, in case of a power outage (Unnecessary, but what the heck, why not?)
    • Keeping track of tank temp and cutting power to the tank heater in case of an issue
    • Anything else that I don’t need but would like to try and implement

    Thus far, my current build consists of:

    • SainSmart Arduino Mega 2560 (Knockoff from Amazon for like $28)
    • Sparkfun DS1307 RTC
    • Adafruit 20×4 LCD display
    • Adafruit 10K Precision Epoxy Thermistor
    • Small piezo buzzer for alarms
    • Assorted buttons, resistors, transistors to make it all work

    Read More.


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog  as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:00
    From the Forums: Creating the Dream Acquarium with an Arduino #ArduinoD14

    Pasted Image 3 28 14 12 02 AM


    Creating the Dream Acquarium with an Arduino
    , shared on the Adafruit Forums:

    So, I am throwing my hat into the Arduino total tank build, and I will try and document as much of my journey as possible here. I have tinkered around with the Arduino in the past, but have never attempted anything of this complexity. I have zero real world programming experience, but enjoy reading sites like hackaday, lifehacker, and such. What I’m saying here is that my code will look pathetically amateurish and possibly unreadable if viewed by a professional…

    So, the goals of my personal build will be:

    • Autodosing
    • Keeping track of the fert levels and alarming if they become low (I am rather forgetful and would like a warning)
    • Keeping my light schedule
    • Controlling CO2 solenoid
    • Scheduling an auxiliary RGB strip, as I will shamelessly steal from AnotherHobby Fallen Tree Branch 60cm
    • The aux RGB strip will have sunrise, sunset, and moonlight as AnotherHobby has, ideally
    • Writing all of the alarm times to the DS1307 RAM, in case of a power outage (Unnecessary, but what the heck, why not?)
    • Keeping track of tank temp and cutting power to the tank heater in case of an issue
    • Anything else that I don’t need but would like to try and implement

    Thus far, my current build consists of:

    • SainSmart Arduino Mega 2560 (Knockoff from Amazon for like $28)
    • Sparkfun DS1307 RTC
    • Adafruit 20×4 LCD display
    • Adafruit 10K Precision Epoxy Thermistor
    • Small piezo buzzer for alarms
    • Assorted buttons, resistors, transistors to make it all work

    Read More.


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog  as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 10:00
    w00dBob: A biped wooden robot made with Arduino Nano #ArduinoD14

    Erik Kramer shared his wooden robot project on Let’s Make Robots III. Adorable and awesome!

    Hello LMRians,

    This is w00dBoB, my attempt at creating a BoB the Biped. I was so impressed with all the printed BoBs on LMR, I felt an irresistible urge to add yet another member to the ever growing army of our small cuboid friends :) Since I don’t have access to a 3D printer I decided to craft my tiny friend from balsa wood: great strength to weight ratio, easy to process and (personal opinion) a lovely natural appearance. However, I was not too confident with getting the leg-angles glued strong enough together to hold the head, so I ordered those from a remote printing service, them turning out to be the most expensive part of the entire rig.

    Read more about the build here.

    NewImage


    NewImage

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:17
    Happy Arduino Day 2014! #ArduinoD14

    Arduino Day  Streaming from  ITP in New York (12-5 pm) with Massimo Banzi and Tom Igoe:

     

    Arduino Day Hangout onAir at Adafruit on a special Saturday night 7pm ET March 29th, 2014 LIVE show!

     

    Click and find the Arduino Day event near you on the Map.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:01
    Energy-Saving Fireplace Thermostat

    [Andrian] has a boiler stove that heats water and sends it to a radiator. As the fireplace heats the water in a boiler a temperature sensor opens the a valve to send the warm water to the radiator. The radiator sends its cool water back to the boiler to be reheated. The valve is slow, so before the boiler can send all the water to the radiator, it’s getting cool water back causing the valve to close while the heat is built back up. To prevent the valve from working so hard and wasting energy, [Andrian] designed a better thermostat to control the valve operation.

    The thermostat uses one LM85 temperature sensor to check the water in the boiler and another one for the ambient temperature. Once the boiler water reaches the desired temperature, the valve is opened via relay. The system waits for half an hour and then checks the boiler temperature again. The brains of this operation is an ATMega168 with a 32.768kHz crystal as the RTC. Code and PCB files are available in his repo.

    We love to see these types of hacks that challenge the status quo and increase the efficiency of appliances. We applaud you, [Andrian], for turning your dissatisfaction into a positive plan of action and for sharing your experience with the rest of us!

    If you want to up the eco-friendliness of heating water a bit, you could heat the water with a compost heap.

    Filed under: green hacks, home hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:00
    Toa Mata Band: World’s first LEGO band #ArduinoD14

    Music producer Giuseppe Acito built a LEGO band out of Bionicle pieces, which are controlled by an Arduino Uno. Sit back, relax and listen to the smooth beats of the Toa Mata Band. via gizmag.

    Each “member” of the band is constructed from LEGO Bionicle pieces rigged with rubber bands and pulleys. Their arms are controlled by an Arduino Uno connected to an iPad running Nord Beat, a MIDI sequencer app. The tiny bots essentially perform a MIDI sequence by hitting the instrument they’re facing when prompted.

    So far, Acito has used a range of different synthesizers and drum machines, including some vintage equipment. The way the bots are set up, they can perform a pre-programmed song or play live with a human operator adding commands to the MIDI sequence in real-time.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 08:00
    How To Make Your Sneakers Into Music Makers #ArduinoD14

    How To Make Musical MIDI Shoes via thobson

    Like many people, I often find myself unconsciously tapping my feet, whether it’s along to a song or out of some nervous habit. As fun as that is though, I’ve always felt as if something has been missing. If only I could trigger the sounds of say, a rabid pack of furious jungle beasts instead of those boring old toe taps. Or, you know, drum sounds or something. I guess that’s cool too.

    Well, now my dreams have been realized! In this “tutorial” I’ll show you how to go about making a pair of awesome musical shoes.

    NewImage

    See Full Tutorial


    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 07:00
    This Vending Machine is Now Cyborg Friendly #ArduinoD14

    With the help of an Adadfruit RFID/NFC Shield, this ATM no longer requires credit cards, from hackaday.

    Don’t you hate having to pull out your wallet or cellphone in order to pay for something? What if you could just wave your hand and transfer money that way? Well [David] did, so he decided to do something about it. He made the vending machine in his hackerspace, FamiLAB, cyborg friendly.

    The problem was, the vending machine wasn’t technically his to play around with… so he had to do this hack without actually modifying the machine itself — which we admit, actually makes it quite a bit more interesting!

    But first, why is [David] even doing this? Is he a cyborg or something? Well, not quite, but he’s quite enthusiastic about bio-tech (is that what we call it now?) — anyway, he has NFC implants in his hand, and magnets in his fingertips to give him a sixth “electro-sense”. Wanting to take the most advantage of these augmented abilities, he put together this clever NFC credit card emulator.

    To read his hand, he’s using an Adafruit RFID/NFC Shield stuck on the front of the machine, with an Arduino Mega 2560 to control it. To get around messing with the credit card unit, he’s placed a solenoid next to it, which is close enough that when energized with his information… the credit card machine reads it. Whether or not you like the cyborg action itself, what [David's] put together is pretty incredible. He has detailed instructions and material on GitHub if you’re interested in knowing more.

    Oz6dlvn

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Products!

    ID789 LRG

    Adafruit PN532 NFC/RFID Controller Shield for Arduino + Extras: We’ve taken our popular Adafruit PN532 breakout board and turned it into a shield – the perfect tool for any 13.56MHz RFID or NFC application. The Adafruit NFC shield uses the PN532 chip-set (the most popular NFC chip on the market) and is what is embedded in pretty much every phone or device that does NFC. This chipset is very powerful, and can pretty much do it all, such as read and write to tags and cards, communicate with phones (say for payment processing), and ‘act’ like a NFC tag. While the controller has many capabilities, our Arduino library currently only supports reading/writing tags, and does not support phone-to-shield communication, tag emulation (which requires an external ‘secure element’ only available from NXP) or other more advanced features at this time. Read more!



    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 07:00
    Happy Arduino Day!

    alt text

    EDIT: 3/30/2014 Midnight - Arduino Day is over! If you placed a backorder on March 29th then don’t worry about settling your balance right away. We’ll get in touch with you when payment is due! Also, if you contacted Customer Service before the Arduino Day sale ended please be patient and we’ll respond as soon as possible.

    It’s worldwide “Arduino Day” - celebrating Arduino’s 10th birthday! Arduino has been a key player in the DIY movement and has been instrumental in 100s of our projects. To be it succinctly - we’re fans.

    So March 29th we are offering the following boards at a discount price. These discounts run March 29th, 2014, from 12:00:01 a.m. - 11:59:59 p.m. Mountain Time. There is a limit of two units for each product (per order) and back-orders are allowed.

    EDIT: 3/29/2014 3:45am (Mountain Time) - We’ve identified the backorder malfunction and enacted a work-around. Products are back-order-able again! Thank you for bearing with us.

    Distributors - these prices don’t apply to you, but we have a special discount for you (we emailed you a list of your items).

    So on March 29th, here are the deals!

    Arduino Uno was $29.95 now $18

    Arduino Uno SMD was $29.95 now $18

    Arduino Pro 328 3.3V was $14.95 now $6

    Arduino Pro 328 5V was $14.95 now $6

    SparkFun Arduino-Compatible Redboard was $24.95 now $9

    Arduino Pro 5V was $9.95 now $3

    Arduino Pro 3.3V was $9.95 now $3

    We hope this helps you build something amazing! Happy Birthday, Arduino!

    3/29/2014 5:15am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    A Note About Payment For Back-Orders - you don’t have to pay until the goods arrive and are ready to ship!
    See our Payments Information page for details.

    If you are paying with PayPal, and your order has back-ordered items, you may not be redirected to the PayPal site. This is because we do not take payment until your order is ready to ship. Once everything is in stock, we’ll send you a money request.

    3:45am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    We’ve identified the malfunction and enacted a work-around. Products are back-order-able again. Thank you for bearing with us.

    1:15am (Mountain Time) - edited to add:
    We realize the malfunction with the backorder system. We apologize for the added frustration and the unhappy surprise. Thank you for your patience.

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  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:01
    Successful 3D Printed Cranium Implant

    implant-1

    What an age we live in. If the image above looks like the entire top of a skull — it’s because it is. Surgeons successfully replaced a 22 year old woman’s cranium with this plastic copy.

    We’ve seen small 3D printed transplants before, but nothing as big as this. A 22 year old woman suffered from a very rare disorder in which her skull never stopped growing. While normal skulls are about 1.5cm thick, hers was almost 5cm thick by the time of the surgery. If they left it any longer, the continued bone growth would have eventually killed her.

    Until now this surgery has required a hand-made concrete-like implant to replace the removed bone. As you can imagine, it’s hardly an ideal solution. Thanks to continually advancing 3D printing technology, surgeons at the University of Utrecht UMC were able to create an exact copy in a durable and lightweight clear plastic, which also has a better rate of brain function recovery than the old way of doing it.

    The 23 hour surgery took place last December and was a huge success with the patient making a full recovery — if you’re not too squeamish around exposed brains, check out the following video. Wow.

    [Thanks Kyle!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:00
    Building the SOLARbot: A 18 month journey as a Maker #ArduinoD14

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    SOLARbot, shared on Polyideas.com.

    As a quick introduction, this is a project to build an open-source 2-axis solar tracker, named the Solar Outdoor Lightweight Adjustable Robot, or SOLARbot.  The goal is to maximize the efficiency and portability of a single large solar panel to make it portable for use in emergencies, developing countries, or even camping.  I’ve listed out several different aspects of the build below….

    Github is where you will find all of my plans and wiring schematics, etc. Code optimization and fixes are always welcome!

    Adafruit Forums – These forums have been an excellent source of support- if you are experimenting with the Adafruit GPS module, I encourage you to check out their learning page and the support forums for that device. They have many different subforums for all their products.

    Read More.

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    Pasted Image 3 28 14 6 49 PM

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    Arduino adafruit industries blog

    March 29th is Arduino Day 2014! Arduino day is “a worldwide event bringing together Arduino people and projects. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.” Adafruit will be celebrating with 24 hours of Arduino posts on our blog  as well as a special Saturday night LIVE show with Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO of Arduino. Join us Saturday, March 29th at 7 PM EST to celebrate Arduino Day 2014! Be sure to check out our extensive learning system tutorials on Arduino as well as our Arduino blog coverage and products.

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