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  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 07:00
    BeagleBone Black plot analog sensor on #Adafruit bi-color LED matrix #beagleboneblack @TXInstruments @beagleboardorg


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    Thanks to Drew Fustini for sending in his project! Via the element 14 community.

    I’ve previously had great results connecting Adafruit 8×8 LED matrix displays to the BeagleBone Black via I2C:

    I decided to try out the Adafruit bi-color 8×8 LED matrix and hooked it up with the same I2C pins as before. You’ll need to setup the Adafruit_BBIO Python library if you haven’t already:
    https://learn.adafruit.com/setting-up-io-python-library-on-beaglebone-black/overview

    You’ll also want to grab the Adafruit Python libraries for the Raspberry Pi since they work on BeagleBone Black, too:
    https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-Raspberry-Pi-Python-Code

    Here is the BegaleBone Black running the demo program ex_8x8_color_pixels.py from the repo:
    https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-Raspberry-Pi-Python-Code

    I thought it would be interesting to plot the readings from a sensor over time on the matrix with different colors representing the magnitude of the reading:

    I hooked up a pot to the analog input to simulate a sensor. Here’s the Python script:
    https://github.com/pdp7/beaglebackpack/blob/master/plot.py

    It is Invoked by this shell script so that PYTHONPATH will be set:
    https://github.com/pdp7/beaglebackpack/blob/master/plot.sh

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

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    Adafruit Bicolor LED Square Pixel Matrix with I2C Backpack: What’s better than a single LED? Lots of LEDs! A fun way to make a small colorful display is to use a 1.2″ Bi-color 8×8 LED Matrix. Matrices like these are ‘multiplexed’ – so to control all the 128 LEDs you need 24 pins. That’s a lot of pins, and there are driver chips like the MAX7219 that can help control a matrix for you but there’s a lot of wiring to set up and they take up a ton of space. Here at Adafruit we feel your pain! After all, wouldn’t it be awesome if you could control a matrix without tons of wiring? That’s where these adorable LED matrix backpacks come in. We have them in three flavors – a mini 8×8, 1.2″ Bi-color 8×8 and a 4-digit 0.56″ 7-segment. They work perfectly with the matrices we stock in the Adafruit shop and make adding a bright little display trivial. It’s called a Bicolor LED, but you can have 3 colors total by turning on the red and green LEDs, which creates yellow. That’s 3 colors for the price of 2! Read more.

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 07:00
    Fixing Apple TV’s Terrible UI

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    Despite Apple’s unfailing dedication to UI, they still sometimes manage to put out some stinkers. The latest of these is the ‘keyboard’ for the search interface in the Apple TV. It’s an alphabetical keyboard, laid out in a square with the obvious frustration that goes along with that terrible idea. [Lasse] was frustrated with this design and realized searching anything with the Apple TV IR remote is a pain. His solution was to build his own version of the Apple TV remote with a web interface, powered by an Arduino.

    Inspired by the Apple Remote Arduino Shield we featured a few years ago, [Lasse] stuck an IR LED int the pins of Arduino with an Ethernet shield, current limiting resistors be damned. The web UI is the innovative part of this build. He’s hosting a simple website on the Arduino that allows him to type – with a real keyboard – a search query into the website, and have the Arduino take care of moving the Apple TV cursor around to select each letter.

    The web UI has all the features found on the Apple TV remote, including the swipe gestures, and has a really slick brushed metal texture to boot. You can check out the video of [Lasse]‘s project typing text into an Apple TV hilariously fast below.

     

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, macs hacks

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 06:30
    Momentum: large format photos of chalkboards from quantum mechanics institutions by Alejandro Guijarro #ArtTuesday


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    Via Colossal.

    Momentum is a project by artist Alejandro Guijarro who spent three years traveling to the quantum mechanics departments of Cambridge, Stanford, Berkeley, Oxford and elsewhere to shoot large format photographs of blackboards just after lectures. Completely removed from the context of a classroom or laboratory and displayed in a gallery, the cryptic equations from one of the most formidable branches of physics become abstract patterns of line and color. Via the artist’s statement:

    Before he walks into a lecture hall Guijarro has no idea what he will find. He begins by recording the blackboard with the minimum of interference. No detail of the lecture hall is included, the blackboard frame is removed and we are left with a surface charged with abstract equations. At this stage they are documents. However, once removed from their institutional beginnings the meaning evolves. The viewer begins to appreciate the equations for their line and form. Colour comes into play and the waves created by the blackboard eraser suggest a vast landscape or galactic setting. The formulas appear to illustrate the worlds of Quantum Mechanics. What began as a precise lecture, a description of the physicist’s thought process, is transformed into a canvas open to any number of possibilities.

    Guijarro graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010 with a MA in fine art and now lives

    and works in both London and Madrid. He’ll have work later this year at PhotoEspaña

    Read more.

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  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 06:00
    Adafruit.com traffic March 2014 vs March 2013


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    A little late posting this up for the month ending in March 2014, thank you for visiting, a lot! YouTube views here (8m as of 4/2014).

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 06:00
    Earth becomes art in breathtaking satellite imagery #ArtTuesday


    Earth becomes art in breathtaking satellite imagery The Verge

    The Verge has posted a bunch of pictures from the Earth as Art collection which were taken via satellite.

    From above, the Vatnajokull Glacier is an eerie splash of blue against the florid hues of the surrounding landscape. This image of Iceland’s Skaftafell National Park was taken by a satellite miles above the Earth. It’s beautiful and also just one of the many geographical wonders showcased in the Earth as Art Collection.

    Unlike most of the satellite images captured by the Landsat 7 satellite, these were taken for their aesthetic value and not for scientific purposes. The color-enhanced photographs not only reveal a view of the planet few will ever see but also a glimpse of natural phenomenons like a giant whirlpool cloud parked above the sea between Spain and Morocco.

    The entire Earth as Art collection is free to download from Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Image Gallery. It’s also possible to purchase printed copies of the satellite images from the US Geological Survey store.

    Read more.

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    Screenshot 4 2 14 11 48 AMEvery Tuesday is Art Tuesday here at Adafruit! Today we celebrate artists and makers from around the world who are designing innovative and creative works using technology, science, electronics and more. You can start your own career as an artist today with Adafruit’s conductive paints, art-related electronics kits, LEDs, wearables, 3D printers and more! Make your most imaginative designs come to life with our helpful tutorials from the Adafruit Learning System. And don’t forget to check in every Art Tuesday for more artistic inspiration here on the Adafruit Blog!

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 04:00
    A 7″ Touchscreen TV Remote Control from Scratch

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    [Jason] always wanted a touchscreen TV remote control. He could have pressed an older Android tablet into service, but he wanted to roll his own system. [Jason] gathered the parts, and is in the process of building his own 7″ touchscreen setup. He started with a 7″ LCD capacitive touchscreen. He ordered his display from buy-display.com, a Far East vendor.

    [Jason's] particular display model comes mounted on a PCB which includes controllers for the display and touchscreen, as well as some memory and glue logic. The LCD controller board has quite a few jumpers to support multiple interfaces and options. While the documentation for the display was decent, [Jason] did find a few errors. After getting in touch with tech support at buy-display, he wrote a simple application which determines which jumpers to set depending on which hardware interfaces are selected from drop down lists.

    With the LCD sorted, [Jason] still needed a processor. He selected the venerable Microchip PIC32MX series. This decision allowed him to use a Fubarino for the early prototypes, before switching to his own board as the system matured. [Jason] was able to get a simple GUI up and running, with standard remote buttons to control his TV and cable box. Code is on his Github repository.

    [Jason's] most recent work has centered on cutting the cord. He’s switched over from DC power to a 2600 mAh LiPo battery. Click past the break to see [Jason] test out his fully wireless work in progress.

    Filed under: home entertainment hacks

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 03:20
    New Project: The Big Picture

    Explore the full-size image at gigamacro.com/make.Using a basic digital camera and photo software, you can produce a large high-resolution macro image with a long depth of field.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 01:00
    Smart Microwave Shows You How It’s Done

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    Do you still have technical difficulties with your microwave? Never know how long to put that half eaten hot-pocket in for? With the nextWAVE (trademark pending) you don’t need to know! Simply scan the bar code and let the nextWave do its thing — wirelessly!

    [Kashev Dalmia], [Dario Aranguiz], [Brady Salz] and [Ahmed Suhyl] just competed in the HackIllinois Hackathon 2014, and their project was this awesome smart microwave. It uses a Spark Core Microcontroller to control the microwave and communicate wirelessly over Wi-Fi. They’ve developed an Android app to allow you to scan bar codes, which are then looked up in a Firebase Database to determine the optimum (crowd sourced) cook time. To make it easy for anyone to use, an app link NFC tag is placed on the microwave for easy installation.

    It even automatically opens the door when it’s done — and plays Funky Town! Oh and it also has a Pebble app to show you the time remaining on your food. We think this Raspberry Pi microwave might give it a run for its money though…

    Filed under: cooking hacks

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 00:00
    This knitwear designer/cardiac radiographer is turning brain scans into fashion


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    The Libertine has the story on Brooke Roberts, a knitwear designer/cardiac radiographer who’s doing some very cool things with fashion design.

    Knitwear designer Brooke Roberts is a busy woman. By day, she works as a cardiac radiographer at King’s College Hospital in South London. By night she designs knitwear based on her patients’ CT and MRI scans. Her innovative approach to design has seen her awarded 2011 Creative in Residence at London’s Hospital Club, owned by Microsoft Co-Founder Paul G Allen, and she has consulted luxury brands on their approach to knits. The link to the Hospital Club has provided additional source material; Brooke has used brain mapping images from the Allen Brain Institute in Seattle in several fabrics.

    “Being a radiographer means analysing images. It’s heavily aesthetic-based, so when I’m working as a radiographer, I’m looking at fluoroscopic x-ray images all day and I even create images through fluoroscopy and live x-rays’, she explains.

    “A fluoroscopic image is different from single shot diagnostic imagery, which produces a single image,’ she continues, ‘Fluoroscopic imagery acquires a certain number of frames-per-second, so it provides real-time moving images on the screen. The images help me with ideas about shape and form and about how to construct art works that can mould and map the body. I’m always taking ideas from what I’m seeing, whether it’s medical or non-medical and I focus on what interests me as a person.

    “My research has extended way beyond the images I create. It started at radiography and has grown as a concept which involves looking at the body broken down into images and how that can be made into fabric.’

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    Four years ago, after working with other designers, Brooke felt confident enough to go it alone. She set up Brooke Roberts Knitwear and already supplies luxury knitwear products to Browns in South Molton Street in London’s Mayfair. Her label is also stocked online at Avenue 32.

    Since her university days at Sydney, Brooke says she’s always harboured a love of science and an interest in fashion, but never thought the two careers could co-exist so harmoniously. It wasn’t until she began collaborating with another designer that she gained the relevant experience. Together they developed a tailored way of cutting knit that was like cutting cloth. It’s complex, as the level of detail in a medical image is so enormous that it makes it impossible to condense it into a knitting machine. But Brooke relishes a challenge; this turned out to be pioneering research.

    “MRI and CT scans lend themselves well to knit, she says. ‘They are digital files and at their most basic level, they are pixels and in a knitting machine a pixel is a stitch, so they’re programmable, and they do translate. But you’d need a machine that was hundreds of metres wide to cope with that level of detail!’, she laughs.

    ‘So I had to go through a process of translation. I can simplify medical images and I can enhance or reduce their definition and make the image just black or white. It’s called the ‘grey scale’ in medical terms. When I play with the image, it loses its texture and becomes flat and then I can make that translate’.

    Brooke is able to work with existing computer programmes using a mixture of sketching, Photoshop and Illustrator to develop what she imagines her garment should look like. At this point it becomes a file that will work with a digital knitting machine.

    Read more.

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  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:35
    How to Remake the World by Making with Kids

    makerkids2Insights from MakerKids, one of the world's only makerspaces for kids.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:14
    NEW PRODUCT – Adafruit LED Sequins – Rose Pink – Pack of 5


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    NEW PRODUCT – Adafruit LED Sequins – Rose Pink – Pack of 5: Sew a little sparkle into your wearable project with an Adafruit LED Sequin. These are the kid-sister to our popular Flora NeoPixel, they only show a single color and they don’t have digital control, but that makes them smaller easier to use for many projects.

    Simply connect 3 to 6VDC to the + pin and ground to the – pin, and the LED on the board will light up. You can make the LEDs fade and twinkle by using the PWM (a.k.a. analogWrite) functionality of your Gemma or Flora, or just connect directly to a digital I/O pin of a microcontroller to turn on and off. Or even skip the micro altogether, and power directly from a LiPoly or coin battery.

    This order comes with 5 Rose Pink “1206 size” LEDs, matched with a 100 ohm resistor. When powered from 3.3V they draw about 5mA so you can put up to 4 or 5 in parallel on a single microcontroller pin. We also have these sequins in ruby red, emerald green, royal blue, and warm white.

    In stock and shipping now!

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  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:11
    Rev C and BeagleBoard Compliant Element14 BeagleBone Black


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    Addressing the enormous demand for BeagleBone Blacks, BeagleBoard.org is introducing a Rev C BeagleBone Black and enabling a BeagleBoard Compliant Element14 BeagleBone Black.

    Rev C increases the on-board eMMC size from 2GB of eMMC to 4GB and switches the included image from Angstrom Distribution to Debian. A slight price increase helps cover the cost for the larger eMMC and to pay to expedite production at CircuitCo.

    Element14 is also coming on as a producer of BeagleBoard Compliant boards. While they are not the official BeagleBoard.org boards being quality controlled directly by Gerald, they are identical in function and built from the same design materials, confirmed to run the same software.

    Both of these moves are meant to help address the large demand for boards and get them into your hands faster. Expectation is to clear existing backlog orders by mid-May. Keep tuned to Adafruit’s stock, however, as Rev B boards will continue to show up as Rev C production is ramped.

    Read more.

     

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:00
    How To Make Horns With Just Cardboard and Hot Glue


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    Horns are a handy cosplay accessory to have in your toolkit. They’re great for fantasy costumes you put together at the last minute and are a fit for a variety of costume situations such as the renaissance faire. If you don’t want to make horns from clay, which can be heavy, you can fashion them from cardboard and hot glue. DeviantArt user MonkeyNumber5 cut cardboard into strips, rolled them, and glued them together. Once they’re dry, you can paint them and attach them to a headband or ribbon.

    See the entire tutorial at DeviantArt.

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:00
    This Font Made From CGI Skin Will Make You Feel Gross #ArtTuesday


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    CGI software a brand new and totally absurb sculpted font. by Liz Stinton

    Computer-generated imagery software has given us some truly wonderful gifts: Avatar, Jurassic Park, and that creepy dancing man, to name just a few. Also? These totally absurd, photorealistic letters.

    Created by German design studio FOREAL, the typography project began as an extracurricular activity to the company’s advertising work. Founders Benjamin Simon and Dirk Shuster were looking to sharpen their 4-D animation chops beyond the strict briefs and parameters they usually worked within. Working with clients offered little room for experimentation, even less for a typographic free for all. “That’s when we decided to do a sculpted alphabet,” Simon and Schuster explain. “And we found out it was great fun.”

    The letters range from gorgeous to shudder-inducing. Take the letter “K,” for example, which appears to be make from a knobby slab of pasty skin sprouting moles and hair. Then there’s “Y,” a stretch of translucent blue goo dripping from a pair of broken eggs. A lowercase “I” looks like a Snickers broken at the tip to create dot, and “D” appears carved out of moon rock. “Our inspirations came from specific objects we’ve seen,” they explain. “And some of the letters were born in a random experimenting phase.”

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    Each letter was constructed in CGI as a sculpted model. The team says the most common way to build a virtual 3-D shape is the box modeling method, which uses geometric mesh or shapes as a base. “These are very efficient and fast ways to build up something artificial,” the duo says. “But if you want to create organic stuff, a naturally looking irregular form, these modeling tools come to their limits.”

    Sculpting, on the other hand, begins with a 3-D model that’s already roughly the object’s final form. In the case of the letters, “it has already the basic shape of the final letter but looks more like a edgy low resolution version without any details,” they explain. The software allows the artist to smooth the mesh, essentially turning a rough virtual model into digital clay that can be finessed into a photorealistic object.

    The attention to detail makes it clear the designers considered how an object exists in real life. For instance, how does a candle build up its hardened drizzles of wax? “While burning down a candle the liquid wax drips down step by step, it dries get hard and the next layer of liquid wax follows and so on,” they say. “So we did exactly the same thing in Cinema 4D to achieve the same. Drip by drip – layer by layer.”

    Though the images look real, FOREAL’s typography isn’t hyper-realistic. Rather, it occupies a strange place between photorealism and surrealism. “It’s important for us to have realistic parts but it never was just to create a hyper-realistic reproduction of existing objects,” the founders say. “Our biggest aim is to create bold and graphic illustration with a surreal twist.”

    See More


    Screenshot 4 2 14 11 48 AMEvery Tuesday is Art Tuesday here at Adafruit! Today we celebrate artists and makers from around the world who are designing innovative and creative works using technology, science, electronics and more. You can start your own career as an artist today with Adafruit’s conductive paints, art-related electronics kits, LEDs, wearables, 3D printers and more! Make your most imaginative designs come to life with our helpful tutorials from the Adafruit Learning System. And don’t forget to check in every Art Tuesday for more artistic inspiration here on the Adafruit Blog!

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 23:00
    3D Printed Emotive Quadruped Robot


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    3D Printed Emotive Quadruped by antpgomes

    This week my students from Computing in the Creative Arts had a public exhibit of their term projects. This project is close to my heart as I worked closely with this particular group of students who despite having very little technical background were deeply passionate about creating an interactive robot capable of expressing emotions and interacting with people.

    The students involved were

    Lauren Abramsky,

    Kristy Titanic,

    Jesse Shaw

    I have submitted this project to the robots and arduino contests.

    I present you “Goon Quad”. In this version, Goon Quad has 4 prerecorded states (“angry”,”party”,”confused”,”breathe”), triggered by the touch of a person in areas specified by the eyebrows and a tattoo that read “Mom”, painted with bare conductive and used as capacitive sensors.

    To enable the robot to record new motions, 8 analog feedback servos were used. As of now, we are only using one leg to record and translating it into the remaining 3. v2 will feature a fully programmable robot. Here’s an example of the recording motion in action (1st video just arms, 2nd video arms and base) In the step by step I will provide all the .stl files and early iterations of the robot.

    See Full Tutorial

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 22:52
    3D Printing Custom Technic-Compatible Beams and Gears

    Make: Lego and Arduino ProjectsBrian Jepson got Lego beams and gears the best way possible: he printed them.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 22:00
    Scientists discover efficient way to turn carbon monoxide into ethanol


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    IEEE Spectrum has a post about a new discovery out of Stanford University.

    Biofuels, once hailed as a planetary savior and alternative to oil and gas, have not quite fulfilled that destiny. Traditional, mass-produced biofuels from crops such as corn carry a litany of problems, including land use issues and questions of life cycle emissions. If we could generate usable fuels from more benign sources, it could go a long way toward solving a host of energy and environmental problems. A team at Stanford University reports today in Nature that they have a novel way to produce ethanol from carbon monoxide (CO) gas using a metal catalyst made of copper nanocrystals.

    “We have discovered the first metal catalyst that can produce appreciable amounts of ethanol from carbon monoxide at room temperature and pressure—a notoriously difficult electrochemical reaction,” said senior study author and Stanford chemistry professor Matthew Kanan in a press release.

    Copper is the only material known to electroreduce CO down to generate fuels, but it does so at extremely low efficiencies. Kanan’s group improved this with a nanocrystalline form of copper produced from copper oxide; this new material improves the efficiency of the reactions dramatically.

    The researchers built a fuel cell, including a cathode made of the new copper nanocrystals, and suspended it in CO-saturated water; a small voltage applied across the fuel cell generates the resulting ethanol products. The Faraday efficiency using the oxide-derived material was 57 percent, meaning more than half of the current used went toward producing ethanol and acetate. Standard copper particles, meanwhile, produced hydrogen almost exclusively (Faraday efficiency of 96 percent) and very little ethanol.

    Read more.

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 22:00
    Electric Imp Locks and Unlocks your Door Automatically

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    When the folks over at PinMeTo moved into a new office, they were dismayed to find out an extra key would run them a whopping 500 sek (~$75 USD). Instead, they decided to build their own automatic door lock using the Electric Imp system.

    If you’re not familiar, the Electric Imp is a small SD card designed to provide internet (Wi-Fi) functionality to consumer devices. While it looks like an SD card, you cannot just plug it into any SD card slot and expect it to work — it still needs a prototyping board. We’ve seen it used to make a wireless thermal printer, or even make a tweeting cat door to let you know of any feline intruders!

    Anyway — back to the hack. To move the lock cylinder they’re using a basic RC servo connected directly to the Imp. A flex sensor is installed on the side of the door over-top the lock — this provides feedback to the Imp whether or not the door is in fact locked. The Imp then communicates to Everymote to allow for keypad access from your mobile phone.

    It probably ended up costing more in time and money than a new key, but hey, it looks like it was a fun project to do!

    Filed under: home hacks, security hacks

  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 21:55
    Make: Books Author Takes Honorable Mention in SPARK Competition

    EK01 Earth & Space Science Kit PrototypeCongratulation to Robert Bruce Thompson, author and co-author of many Make: Books for taking honorable mention in the prototype category of the Science, Play and Research Kit (SPARK) Competition.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Monday, April 14, 2014 - 21:53
    NASA to provide live coverage and commentary of April 15 Lunar Eclipse


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    Will you be staying up all night to see the lunar eclipse? NASA will be providing live coverage so you can find out all the information about what is going on from some very informed sources!

    The public will have the opportunity to view and learn more about the Tuesday, April 15 total lunar eclipse on NASA television, the agency’s website, and social media. Coverage begins at 2 a.m. EDT and will last about three hours. The eclipse’s peak, when the moon will enter the Earth’s full shadow or umbra, will occur at 3:45 a.m.

    The United States will be in a prime orbital position and time of day to view the eclipse. Depending on local weather conditions, the public will get a spectacular view looking into the sky as the moon’s appearance will change from bright orange to blood red to dark brown and perhaps gray. The eclipse is a phenomenon that occurs when the Earth, moon and sun are in perfect alignment, blanketing the moon in the Earth’s shadow. The United States will not be able to witness a full lunar eclipse in its entirety again until 2019.

    Leading up to the eclipse, NASA will host a Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) on Monday, April 14 at 2 p.m. with astronomers from the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center. Various NASA researchers also will be available for media interviews. NASA Twitter, Google+, Facebook, and Instagram followers will be able to join the conversation and ask questions using the hashtag #eclipse.

    The public will be able to tag and share their images of the eclipsed moon on Instagram and on the agency’s Flickr group at:
    https://www.flickr.com/groups/nasalunareclipse

    Lunar eclipse video resources are available at:
    http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/Gallery/2014TotalLunarEclipse.html

    Live NASA TV coverage and commentary will begin at 1 a.m. To view the coverage and access eclipse streaming video, visit:
    http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

    For more information on NASA’s eclipse activities, visit:

    http://go.nasa.gov/1kkfFXX

    Read more and share your eclipse experiences in the comments!

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