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  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 15:01
    3 Cheap Hood/Hatchback/Topper Mods to Save Your Noggin

    Gas Lift Fixes by Briansmobile1

    This is a mod more than a hack but any time you can alter original equipment to maintain its usability is a win-win scenario for you and the environment. Everyone has or knows somebody that has a vehicle and most vehicles nowadays have some type of hatchback or hood where the support solution is gas filled struts. Inevitably these gas filled struts fail with age and the failure is accelerated in hotter or colder climates. If you ever had to replace these items you know they can cost a minimum of $20 to as much as $60 a piece. Most vehicles require two, four or even eight of these costly little devices.

    [Brian] from Briansmobile1 YouTube channel documented three simple and low cost solutions. We all probably know of the vice clamp solution but that is cumbersome and still an expensive solution which is not always very handy or fast. Another solution is to cut a piece of rubber hose in a kind of special way so it is easy to put on and take off the shaft and dangles from a string so it’s always available. The best solution was to use a hitch pin also connected to a string or wire. To make the hitch pin work you have to grind a couple of notches on either side of the lift shaft at just the right spot so the pin can be snapped on and prevent the shaft from retracting at your selected height.

    We are sure these solutions will come in handy at some time in most everyone’s driving career. Just after the break we will link to all three of [Brian’s] handy videos on gas strut fix solutions. And if you do your own automotive repair we can definitely recommend [Brian’s] channel of over 600 vehicle repair and maintenance videos which normally come with a dose of philosophy and humor.

    Hitch Pin

    Hose

    Vise Grip

    Filed under: how-to, repair hacks

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 15:00
    Gravitational waves have been discovered that give the strongest evidence yet for the Big Bang

    NewImage

    Scientific American and Nasa have written about this new discovery that provides the strongest evidence yet that the Big Bang actually happened.

    NASA writes:

    This image shows one of the NASA detectors from the BICEP2 project, developed in collaboration with the National Science Foundation. The sensors were used to make the first detection of gravitational waves in the ancient background light from the early universe. The discovery provides the strongest evidence yet for an explosive period of expansion in our universe known as inflation.

    The detectors were developed and built at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The image was taken by a “scanning electron beam” microscope, giving a close-up, 3-D view. The detector works by converting the light from the cosmic microwave background — relic radiation from the Big Bang — into heat. This heat is dissipated on a meandering gold film located on an island of material suspended in free space by tiny legs that were made by a process called micro-machining. (The island is the rectangle suspended in the black free space.) A superconducting titanium film on the detector (left side of island) serves as a sensitive thermometer to measure this heat.

    The sensors are cooled to just 0.25 degrees above absolute zero to minimize thermal noise. The island is designed to further increase the sensitivity to heat by isolating the thermometer from the rest of the structure.

    Scientific American also reports:

    Physicists have found a long-predicted twist in light from the big bang that represents the first image of ripples in the universe called gravitational waves, researchers announced today. The finding is direct proof of the theory of inflation, the idea that the universe expanded extremely quickly in the first fraction of a nanosecond after it was born. What’s more, the signal is coming through much more strongly than expected, ruling out a large class of inflation models and potentially pointing the way toward new theories of physics, experts say.

    “This is huge,” says Marc Kamionkowski, professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, who was not involved in the discovery but who predicted back in 1997 how these gravitational wave imprints could be found. “It’s not every day that you wake up and find out something completely new about the early universe. To me this is as Nobel Prize–worthy as it gets.”

    Read more from NASA here and Scientific American here.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 14:00
    Designers use Robot to Sculpt Wooden Stools #manufacturingmonday

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    This robot has made the career jump from auto-worker to artisan. Sasha Ritter and Armand Graham repurposed the robot, formerly used by the auto-industry, to make these beautiful wooden stools named totoro. The wood is locally sourced form upstate NY, via design boom.

    showcasing the natural beauty found in silver maple wood, the ‘totoro collection’ is a series of stools designed in collaboration by new york-based armand graham of timbr and sasha ritter. the versatile pieces are created from logs found in ithaca and crafted using a robot, which was previously employed by the automotive industry. the two ton arm of the machine was able to translate the computer generated form into a precise sculptural reality that could not have been achieved by hand. the object’s cracking, which occurs during the drying phase represents a tension between the manufacturing process and the natural material. this creates a different final outcome each time, no matter how much control the technology offers, the natural material has a life of its own.

    Img 8 1395165837 0119375bdd9ecc41b16993419f65dc06

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    Read more.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 14:00
    Light-Up Diablo III Costume Looks Fantastic And Scary

    diablo 3 cosplay

    I barely have the words to articulate how impressive this Diablo III costume is. Cosplayer Krizdel Igreso fashioned every piece of this wicked Prime Evil ensemble from the lights to the armor to the paint. She documented the build from sketch to finished costume and watching the evolution from plain black foam to menacing red is nothing short of astounding. It’s one of these builds where you learning the process by seeing pictures instead of reading, and you can view the entire gallery at Igreso’s Facebook page.

    diablo 3 in progress

    via Fashionably Geek

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 13:00
    From the Forums: Soil Moisture Testing with the Garduino

    SoilTesting

    uflnuceng shared a nice writeup on results of soil moisture testing on the Forums:

    Ok, using the code above, I setup a DHT22 and an SHT10 as you can see in the image below. The DHT22 was used to give me ambient air temp and relative humidity, while the SHT10 was placed in different media to determine 1) its speed of change, 2) reliability of data reported, 3) consistency of results.

    …Temperature was very consistent, and humidity differed within the margin of error of the sensor (+/- 1.5%).

    I then placed the SHT10 sensor in some dry soil that hasn’t had a plant in it for a very long time.

    As it should be expected, the soil was very dry, but being hydroscopic it contained a little bit more humidity than the air around it (23.4% relative humidity versus ambient air’s 15.6%).

    I then picked a plant that the office didn’t mind me killing. I let it go without water for a few days, although by the finger touch the soil was still damp.

    I then set the sensor to record every 5 minutes for several weeks and this is the resulting graph of that data….

    Read More.

    Soiltesting02

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 12:01
    Embeded Sieve of Eratosthenes: Hunting Primes on ARM

    Embeded Sieve of Eratosthenes

    I ended up with just enough time over the weekend to pull together a quick project. I implemented the Sieve-of-Eratosthenes on an ARM chip.

    If you haven’t heard of the Sieve of Eratosthenes then you really need to work your way through Project Euler. That’s where I first learned about this method of finding prime numbers. You begin with a list of all numbers, find a prime, then remove all multiples of that prime from the list. The real trick with doing it on a microcontroller is to figure out how to store a large list of numbers in a limited space. The gist of my method was to use a boolean array (I call it a bit-packed array but that may be the wrong way of saying it). The details are found in my project linked at the top.

    ‘Why?’ is almost always the wrong question to ask around here. But in this case, I did this because I wanted to try out the Bit Banding functionality of the ARM core. These chips have alias addresses that map to a single bit in the SRAM and also some of the peripheral registers. This allows read or write access for a single bit using a single instruction. Turns out that one side effect of 32-bit architecture is having addresses to burn.

    Filed under: ARM

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 12:00
    Reading my body: A sound controller that uses a tattoo as a music score #MusicMonday #arduino

    NewImage

    Artist and maker Dmitry Morozov sent us a blog tip about his latest project: a sound controller that uses a tattoo as a music score. It’s one of the coolest DIY Instruments we’ve seen. Be sure to check it out in action in the video below.

    this is a special instrument that combines human body and robotic system into a single entity that is designed to automate creative process in an attempt to represent the artist and his instrument as a creative hybrid. The device consists of a railing with comfortable hand holders and two parallel, but offset from each other black lines’ sensors that move along the arm using a stepper motor. It is equipped with a 3-dimensional Wii remote controller that uses the OSC protocol in order to give a possibility of additional expression achieved by moving hand in space.

    the tattoo is specifically designed to contain the maximum number of variable time slots between triggers. It is possible to manually control the velocity of sensors’ movement, direction and step length, that altogether gives an infinite number of variations of reading patterns from hand. In addition, all control parameters and sensors’ movements can be programmed to operate autonomously.

    typical setup: hand controller + Nord Modular G2 and Symbolic Sound Kyma X + OSCulator

    - black line sensors

    - stepper motor

    - arduino nano

    - wii remote

    Read more.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 11:00
    These Junkbots don’t just look cool, they can be functional too!

    Il fullxfull 471057943 qxgg1

    These flexible Junkbots from Mechworld don’t just rely on their charming dystopic junkyard looks to get by, they’re useful, too. For example, the junkbot above makes a pretty neat phone holder, from boingboing.

    Etsy seller MechWorld makes beautiful, ~$100 junkbots out of miscellaneous hardware. They’re extremely poseable, have functional variations (like holding your phone), and there’s even a Wall-E. They’re pretty heavy — 2-3lbs — and ship from Zhuhai, China.

    Il fullxfull 569749998 8tps1

    Read more.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 10:00
    Create a Tetris Rig with a Pair of Adafruit NeoPixel Matrices #neopixel #tetris

    Eduardo Zola shared a video and tutorial details for creating A Tetris Rig with a Pair of Adafruit NeoPixel Matrices:

    Since I started with arduino, i always wanted to make a game based on this platform. So one day I thought, why not create an old classic Tetris ? I remember to play it a lot in old times, mainly in windows 3.1 and 95 ages.
    So, the first thing i needed to start the project, was to find out a RGB display, push buttons or a small joystick, and an enclosure to attach everything. After some research, I found out the Adafruit Neopixel Matrix 8×8, which is very easy to apply because it uses a just a single wire interface and simple handy library. So, I used two matrix of this, which gave me a display of 16 rows and 8 columns of RGB LED (or pixels). For powering, I used a Lithium Ion Battery of 3.7V 4400mAh. It was really necessary to put a capacitor (1000 µF, 6.3V or higher) across the positive and negative terminals of neopixel matrix.

    The next step was to find out a way to control each tetris piece in the game….

    Read More.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NeoPixel Matrix

    Adafruit NeoPixel NeoMatrix 8×8 – 64 RGB LED Pixel Matrix: Put on your sunglasses before wiring up this LED matrix – 64 eye-blistering RGB LEDs adorn the NeoMatrix for a blast of configurable color. Arranged in an 8×8 matrix, each pixel is individually addressable. Only one microcontroller pin is required to control all the LEDs, and you get 24 bit color for each LED. (read more)

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:00
    Mechanical Iris Will Make You Want a Laser Cutter Even More

    iris

    Mechanical irises are very intricately designed mechanisms that are mesmerizing to see in action — and if you have a laser cutter, you could make one in less than 10 minutes.

    Our “Teacher of Science”, Instructables’ user [NTT] has revised a previous Instructables design on a mechanical iris to improve it. The original design used three layers of components and dowel pins for every joint. What [NTT] has done is reduced this to two layers, and eliminated half of the pins required by designing clever circular cutouts. The result is a very slick mechanical iris that is very easy and quick to build — provided you have the tools.

    Stick around to see the original iris open and close — unfortunately there’s no video of the new design — but we think you can imagine the differences.

    Or alternatively you could 3D print a version of it!

    No laser cutter, or 3D printer? We feel your pain. Luckily there is also a cardboard version of it you can make without any fancy tools!

    Filed under: cnc hacks, laser hacks

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:00
    Your Name in Life: Create a unique Game of Life based on your name

    0w4dCAAAAAAI8rceYYFCyIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIABAwYMGDBgwIAB

    Clark DuVall has created this awesome site that takes your name and generates a Game of Life based on it. It lets you take snapshots as well as it expands and grows. You can change the font, drawing options and life options also. Above is “Adafruit Industries” in multicolor. We took this snapshot right at the beginning. Below is what we got after about 45 minutes at the “very fast” speed option. Here’s more about Conway’s Game of Life from wikipedia:

    The universe of the Game of Life is an infinite two-dimensional orthogonal grid of square cells, each of which is in one of two possible states, alive or dead. Every cell interacts with its eight neighbours, which are the cells that are horizontally, vertically, or diagonally adjacent. At each step in time, the following transitions occur:

    • Any live cell with fewer than two live neighbours dies, as if caused by under-population.
    • Any live cell with two or three live neighbours lives on to the next generation.
    • Any live cell with more than three live neighbours dies, as if by overcrowding.
    • Any dead cell with exactly three live neighbours becomes a live cell, as if by reproduction.

    The initial pattern constitutes the seed of the system. The first generation is created by applying the above rules simultaneously to every cell in the seed—births and deaths occur simultaneously, and the discrete moment at which this happens is sometimes called a tick (in other words, each generation is a pure function of the preceding one). The rules continue to be applied repeatedly to create further generations.

    Read more about Conway’s Game of Life here and try it out on your own name here. We also sell a DIY LED project version of the game here.

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  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 08:00
    Alexander Semenov’s incredible underwater photographs of sea life

    NewImage

    Alexander Semenov’s underwater photography is some of the coolest we’ve seen. You can purchase his photographs here and see more of his stunning photography here. Here’s his bio:

    In 2007, I graduated from Lomonosov’s Moscow State University in the department of Zoology. I specialized in the study of invertebrate animals, with an emphasis on squid brains. Soon after, I began working at the White Sea Biological Station (WSBS) as a senior laborer. WSBS has a dive station, which is great for all sorts of underwater scientific needs, and after 4 years working there, I became chief of our diving team. I now organize all WSBS underwater projects and dive by myself with a great pleasure and always with a camera.

    When I first began to experiment with sea life photography I tried shooting small invertebrates for fun with my own old dslr camera and without any professional lights or lenses. I collected the invertebrates under water and then I’ve shot them in the lab. After two or three months of failure after failure I ended up with a few good pictures, which I’ve showed to the crew. It has inspired us to buy a semi-professional camera complete with underwater housing and strobes. Thus I’ve spent the following field season trying to shoot the same creatures, but this time in their environment. It was much more difficult, and I spent another two months without any significant results. But when you’re working at something every day, you inevitably get a lot of experience. Eventually I began to get interesting photos — one or two from each dive. Now after four years of practice I get a few good shots almost every time I dive but I still have a lot of things that need to be mastered in underwater photography.

    And the most important thing — I love Sea.

    Read more.

    NewImage

    NewImage

    NewImage

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 07:00
    Lego-like bottle caps!

    3027112 slide s bottle 01

    These lego-like bottle caps present an even-more sustainable alternative to recycling, from fast coexist:

    Every year, around 87 billion plastic bottle caps are made in the U.S. alone– and most end up in the trash. A company in Brazil hopes to help change that with this line of caps that you might actually want to keep: Each turns into a Lego-like block that can be used as a toy or to build furniture.

    “I wanted to develop a sustainable cap, and I think it’s better to innovate by looking for a problem than by looking for an idea,” says Claudio Patrick Vollers, the CEO of Clever Pack, the company that makes the new caps. “I looked at the whole lifecycle of packaging, including the recycling process, and looked for the biggest environmental problem.”

    Recycling, he noticed, takes quite a bit of energy, both for transportation and the electricity used to melt plastic. So even if a cap makes it to the recycling bin (an unlikely event in the U.S., though it’s a little more likely in Brazil) it still has an environmental impact.

    “I found my opportunity: develop a cap that doesn’t get into the recycling cycle,” Vollers says. “Making a cap with two lives–in the first it is a closure, and in the second life it becomes a block. It was important to me that the consumer wouldn’t have to do anything, like cutting, to reuse the cap. That inspired me to develop Clever Caps.”

    The caps are compatible with Legos, both because Vollers is a Lego fan and because he thought that the design would make them most likely to be used. Beyond toys, they can also be stacked into stools, tables and other furniture.

    3027112 slide s bottle 05

    3027112 inline s bottle 11

    Read more.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 06:00
    Monitoring your Gas Consumption with a JeeNode and a nRF24L01+

    [Sven337] just blogged about a gas consumption monitoring setup he finished not long ago. As his gas meter was located outside his apartment and nowhere near any electrical outlet, a battery-powered platform that could wirelessly send the current consumption data to his Raspberry Pi was required. His final solution therefore consists of a JeeNode coupled with the well known nRF24L01+ wireless transmitter, powered by 3 supposedly dead alkaline batteries.

    [Sven337] carefully looked at the different techniques available to read the data from his meter. At first he had thought of using a reflective sensor to detect the number 6 which (in France at least) is designed to reflect light very well. He then finally settled for a magnetic based solution, as the Actaris G4 gas meter has a small depression intended for magnetic sensors. The PCB you see in the picture above therefore has a reed sensor and a debug LED. The four wires go to a plastic enclosure containing the JeeNode, a couple of LEDs and a reset switch. Using another nRF24L01, the Raspberry Pi finally receives the pulse count and reports it to an eeePC which takes care of the storage and graphing.

    Filed under: hardware, Raspberry Pi

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 06:00
    From the Forums: NeoPixels for an Extreme Sports Zip Line Ropes Course Project

    NeoPixelRopesCourse

    MattJames shared this photo of his NeoPixel rigged Extreme Sports Zip Line Ropes Course on the Adafruit Forums:

    I just finished doing a nice LED project on our indoor ropes course (I’m proud of it and like to show it off) and now I am looking to do our zip line as well. I am not looking to get LEDs on the actual line itself but to get LEDs on the “bullseye” on the opposing walls.

    Read More.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:00
    “Glass brain” (video)

    “Glass brain” (video)

    This is an anatomically-realistic 3D brain visualization depicting real-time source-localized activity (power and “effective” connectivity) from EEG (electroencephalographic) signals. Each color represents source power and connectivity in a different frequency band (theta, alpha, beta, gamma) and the golden lines are white matter anatomical fiber tracts. Estimated information transfer between brain regions is visualized as pulses of light flowing along the fiber tracts connecting the regions.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:00
    12 reasons robotics could be the next trillion-dollar business opportunity #robotics

    NewImage

    Quartz has posted this interesting interview with Dmitry Grishin, head of Grishin Robotics, about the future of the industry. Among the other topics, they cited up Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and 3D printing as reasons why the consumer robot industry will be taking off in the next few years. We’ll post a couple here but be sure to head over to the original post for the full list.

    1.Building robots is cheaper than ever.

    We live in an era of self-driving cars, robotic vacuum cleaners, and ever more autonomous military drones. That’s because innovation comes relatively quickly and cheaply nowadays. “Let’s assume you wanted to build a robot 20 years ago,” Grishin says. “You would need to invest several million dollars to build one robot, and it might take three years.” Costs and timescales like that just don’t fly for modern VCs accustomed to putting their money in software, says Grishin.

    2. Smartphones have made the guts of robots less expensive and more effective than ever

    The biggest improvements in robotics have come from companies outside the field, says Grishin. “Right now because of smartphones, the price of components [useful for robots] is 1% what it was,” says Grishin. “Most of the components in smartphones are same ones you need in robots—sensors, cameras, batteries, processors. The biggest difference between now and 20 years ago is that the components have become cheap.”

    3. And new building blocks keep engineers from having to start from scratch

    So much of the basic infrastructure of an app or web service has already been built and is available for free or at a low cost—from hosting on Amazon to the collaborative software development at the Apache web server—that launching startups is now more about ideas than the technology itself. The same thing is happening in hardware, says Grishin, as basic components (like the open-source microprocessors Arduino and Raspberry Pi) and libraries of code (like the Robot Operating System) begin to reach millions of hobbyists and professionals.

    “It’s very important you have a lot of blocks to easily combine, and you don’t spend too much time to build any of them from scratch,” says Grishin.

    4. Building prototypes of new hardware is easier than ever

    “In the past, prototyping was really hard,” says Grishin. Hardware companies would build a prototype, show it off, then spend another year or two creating the next prototype. “But now, because of 3D printers and good 3D software, you can do prototyping much quicker,” says Grishin.

    Read more.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:00
    Long Life Vehicle (LLV) – How the postal service gets around #makerbusiness

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    Long Life Vehicle (LLV) @ National Postal Museum.

    On July 11, 1987, this white, boxy postal truck known as a Long Life Vehicle was brought into the Smithsonian Institution’s collection. The vehicle was added to the National Philatelic Collection, in the National Museum of American History. In 1993, that collection, including this vehicle, was shared with the public when the National Postal Museum opened in the old DC City Post Office building next to Union Station.
    The Long Life Vehicle, or LLV, marked a major change in how postal officials approached buying vehicles. Until the 1980s, when new vehicles were needed, officials combed through existing models for the best fit. This often resulted in vehicles that met some, but never all, of the demands of moving mail.

    Finally officials decided to try something different. They created a set of criteria for the perfect letter carrier vehicle and challenged commercial vehicle industries to create a vehicle to order. Officials selected from vehicles produced by three groups: Grumman and General Motors, Poveco (Fruehauf & General Automotive Corp), and American Motors. Each vehicle prototype was tested in 1985 over a series of road types in Laredo, Texas. Drivers guided the vehicles over rugged, pothole-filled streets. The drills were created to replicate the needs of city letter carriers. Each vehicle was required to:

    • Drive 5,760 miles on a closed loop 5-mile-long paved road at 50 to 55 mph
    • Drive 11,520 miles over a gravel road at 30 to 45 mph
    • Drive 2,880 miles over a road with a shoulder, stopping every 250 feet and accelerating to 15 mph in between
    • Drive 960 miles over cobblestones that ranged from 3 to 4 inches high at 10 to 14 mph
    • Drive 960 miles over potholes at 10 to 14 mph
    • Haul a 1 -ton pound load during one half of the road test
    • Haul a man and a 400 pound load during one half of the road test
    • Drive over potholes ensuring that each wheel hits a pothole 35,000 times
    • Make one hundred consecutive stops from 15 mph

    Read more – The ones you see around now are the ones they made, they have not made more of them after 1994.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:00
    The Adafruit Bluefruit LE (Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy, Bluetooth 4.0) nRF8001 (video)

    The Adafruit Bluefruit LE (Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy, Bluetooth 4.0) nRF8001 (video).

    Our Adafruit Bluefruit LE (Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy, Bluetooth 4.0) nRF8001 Breakout allows you to establish an easy to use wireless link between your Arduino and any compatible iOS or Android (4.3+) device. It works by simulating a UART device beneath the surface, sending ASCII data back and forth between the devices, letting you decide what data to send and what to do with it on either end of the connection.

    Learn more in the tutorial.
    Learn more about Bluetooth Smart (low energy).
    Get the app in the App Store.

    And pick one up in the Adafruit store!

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 03:00
    Humble Beginnings of a Pick and Place Machine

    beginnings

    [Pete's] invented a product called an AIR Patch Cable designed to interface with an airplane’s intercom, and is looking to manufacture and assemble them himself — unfortunately, the circuit boards are tiny, and SMD components aren’t exactly the easiest to install. So he decided to build a pick and place machine to do it for him!

    It’s not finished yet, but [Pete] has reached a major milestone — he’s finished the base CNC machine aspect of it. He opted for a kit build for the major mechanical components, the Shapeoko 2 — its a solid design and if you decided to make something from scratch it’d probably cost much more and take a lot longer.

    From there he began selecting his electronics individually. He’s chosen the Big Easy Driver by Sparkfun to control his stepper motors, which supports a maximum size of NEMA 17 steppers, so he bought five of those too. To control it all, he’s using LinuxCNC which is an excellent choice — and if you’re not crazy about Linux, you can actually download Ubuntu 10.04 with LinuxCNC pre-installed for you to make it super easy — you’ll just need an old dedicated PC to use.

    Once everything was setup, he wrote a quick program to control his future pick and place machine — he strapped a pen onto the Z-axis and it scratched out its first word: “Gangsta”. Cause you know, G-Code. Right? Yeah. Anyway, we’re quite excited to see how this progresses.

    To see a pick & place machine that’s already functioning, check out this beautiful piece of work!

    Filed under: cnc hacks

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