h:D

Planet

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 15:00
    Dead Space Isaac Clarke Costume with LEDs


    dead space costume

    Patient and dedicated cosplayers often give up hours to the cause, and Steven K Smith Props spent 300 hours over about three months to make this Isaac Clarke from Dead Space costume. The armor is detailed both in construction and paint, and Smith had to apply several light layers of spray paint and washes. He also installed LEDs to make the face light up. He explained the process:

    Moving on to the face lights. Very thin plexi glass purchased from Hobby Lobby was cut to fit in between the plates. The back side of each piece was sanded to diffuse the glow of the LEDs. To light the plates I wired 24 5mm leds to 2 AA battery packs. Because I couldn’t find the correct color I had to first sand then hand paint each LED aqua to match Isaac’s signature glow. I cut 24 little brackets out of sheet metal to hold the LEDs in place and to make sure that they were pointing up at the plexi glass. A very small gap was left in the 2nd Plexi glass plate this is where I will be able to see out of the helmet.

    dead space LEDs

    Read more at Instructables.

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 14:23
    Flying Robot Rockstars (video) #drone #drones



    Flying Robot Rockstars (video)-

    KMel Robotics presents a team of flying robots that have taken up new instruments to play some fresh songs. The hexrotors create music in ways never seen before, like playing a custom single string guitar hooked up to an electric guitar amp. Drums are hit using a deconstructed piano action. And there are bells. Lots of bells.

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 14:00
    Korean Government to Invest Heavily in 3D Printing, Offering 3D Printers to Individuals and Small Businesses for Free #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    WohlersAssoc

    Korean Government to Invest Heavily in 3D Printing, Offering 3D Printers to Individuals and Small Businesses for Free . Via 3Ders.org.

    As reported at koreajoongangdaily:

    The government yesterday announced its plan to nurture the local 3-D printing industry and has will supply printers for small and midsize companies to use for free.

    For its project, the Industry Ministry will spend 2.4 billion won ($2.3 million) this year to set up centers with printers, most of which will be imported, that can be used by the companies, and it will teach employees how to operate them.

    Starting next year, the ministry will lend 3-D printers to individual businesspeople and small companies for free.

    The government hopes the printers will increase manufacturing efficiency and generate profits in the local electronics, auto and medical industries, as well as other consumer goods.

    The Industry Ministry and Science Ministry received approval for their plan at a science and technology committee meeting with other ministers and private sector experts….

    Read More.

    3DPrinting in Korea

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 13:09
    “Added some colour syncing lenses to complete the suit!” #adafruit #led #wearableelectronics #cyberpunk #arduino #snowcrash
  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 13:01
    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Star Trek

    Star Trek Banner

    Ah yes, how could we miss Star Trek? To be honest, we’re surprised there aren’t more entries of Star Trek related projects in our Sci-Fi Contest!

    Star Fleet Communicator Badge

    4053121396952461870There’s actually no info on this project yet, but we have to admit — it’s a pretty cool (albeit nerdy) concept. They want to fit a Bluetooth headset with a loudspeaker into a Star Fleet Communicator Badge, activated by tapping on it gently.

    Just don’t wear a red shirt with it…

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Star Trek: The Mirror Universe Pinball Machine

    star trek the mirror universeThis ones a really cool hack. A team of four have taken a 1978 Bally Star Trek Pinball machine, and converted it into a Star Trek  Mirror Universe Pinball machine based on the TOS episode Mirror, Mirror where Kirk and his crew are transported to a parallel (mirrored) universe!

    Notable features include the custom CNC machined table with custom artwork, a Nixie tube score board, and that they’ve made the design open source! Minus copyrighted artwork of course…

     

    JJ Tricorder

    The JJ Tricorder, named after its team [Julia] and [Jaromir] is planned out to look just like the SR-580 type Tricorder – except its going to be backed with 21st century technology.

    jj tricorderThe main goal of the project is to have it be able to detect and analyse electromagnetic, geographic and environmental parameters. There’s lots of inspiration for it, like the now-open-source Berkeley Tricorder or the Tricorder Project itself!

     

     

     

    Still haven’t entered the contest? Don’t worry – there’s still time for you to put an awesome Sci-Fi project together to win some crazy cool prizes! It just needs to be done and documented by April 29, 2014!

    Filed under: contests

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 13:00
    Using Simplify3D to slice beautiful prints #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Simplify3D sliced Simple Box - Bottom

    Simplify3D sliced Simple Box

    Ashley Webster shared these lovely photos of his weekend project on the 3D Printing google+ community. His goal was to make a simple box and print it as interesting as possible. That lovely looking sheen on the bottom of the part is printed on the build plate. We tend to get similar results when printing in ABS on a heated build plate with kapton tape but Ashley is using PLA. Using a 1:10 pva solution, he painted on a layer to his build plate and let it dry.

    The real beautify lies on how the part was sliced and printed. Using Simplify3D, Ashley sliced the bottom half of the box using 4 processes (4 sets of different slice settings). All at 0.2mm layers.

    I used Simplify3D. The bottom half of the box uses 4 processes (4 sets of different slice settings). All at 0.2mm layers.

    0-1.2mm: Concentric infill, 0.6mm width

    1.2-1.6mm: two layers of rectilinear infill to close a small gap at the center of the concentric infill and make the bottom watertight.

    1.6-2mm: two layers same as first set

    2mm+: 0.45mm filament width and rectilinear infill, because concentric didn’t work so well on the thin wall.

    This is an amazing technique that lets you set different slice settings based on the layers of the object. It’s great to see awesome results coming out from different slicing apps and Simplify3D is one we will definitely check out! As Ashley noted in the photo comments, “the craft to 3D printing is in the slicing.” Big kudos to Ashley for making such a lovely looking print! It definitely shows how to make the 3d printing process look seamless to the design. That wooden grain texture also makes a great combo!

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 12:00
    Students solve old problem with new ketchup cap #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Students solve old problem with new ketchup cap:

    High school seniors Tyler Richards and Jonathan Thompson have spent a lot of time thinking about ketchup.

    As students in the Project Lead the Way program at North Liberty High School, Richards and Thompson have researched and developed a bottle cap that prevents that first squirt of ketchup from being a watery mess.

    Read More.

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 11:00
    123D Design Tutorial – Construct Features #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Probably one of the best tutorials on how to use the construct features in Auto Desks 123D Design. It’s one of those speedy videos on youtube that doesn’t have a voice over, but uses annotations and is very self explanatory (and has some awesome drum’n'bass music in the background). In just four minutes youtube user 3D Kobo shows you quick examples of using Extrude, Sweep, Revolve, Loft features. Be sure to check out the video, and give it a like if you find it useful.

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 10:01
    DIY Multimeter, Arduino Sold Seperately

    Arduino-based Multimeter

    You can’t argue that Arduinos are extremely popular with the maker/hacker community. Some would say that there is certainly no shortage of projects to make using them. [Milen] thought otherwise and felt it was time to create an Arduino-based multimeter.

    At the heart of this project  is a common Arduino Uno. The additional parts were kept to a minimum in order to keep down the overall cost and project complexity. The finished product can measure voltage from 0-100v, amperage up to 500mA and resistance between 0-250 kohm. If you need to check for continuity, it can do that too.

    All of the parts required to make the multimeter fit on a shield that plugs directly into the Arduino. Banana plugs allow for attaching test leads. The measurement values are displayed on an LCD screen and/or (if connected) to the Arduino IDE Serial Monitor. If only using the serial monitor, the LCD screen can be omitted to save a few bucks.

    If you would like to build one for yourself, the above link has detailed instructions, schematics and a bill of material. The best bang-for-the-buck multimeter available is still the Harbor Freight Special that you can usually get for free with purchase.

    [Thanks Karl]

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 10:00
    New PancakeBot #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    New PancakeBot featuring an Adafruit Motorshield!

    The New Version of PancakeBot. To be shown at the Bay Area Maker Faire. May 17th and 18th. San Mateo Fairgrounds.

    visit pancakebot.com for more details.

    Read More.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    Motorshield

    Adafruit Motor/Stepper/Servo Shield for Arduino v2 Kit: The original Adafruit Motorshield kit is one of our most beloved kits, which is why we decided to make something even better. We have upgraded the shield kit to make the bestest, easiest way to drive DC and Stepper motors. This shield will make quick work of your next robotics project! (read more)

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 09:00
    3D Modeling Enclosures for DIY Projects #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    3D Printed Enclosure Parts

    Getting your DIY electronics projects off the bread board and into a neat little package is probably one of the best uses for 3d printing.

    Designing your own project box may seem a little daunting, but knowing the design process can help you get started.

    A good data sheet will include layout dimensions, but sometimes they don’t. Luckily, a good set of calipers can assist you in measuring the dimensions of an object. You’ll be happy to know our custom products here at Adafruit include schematics and layout dimensions.

    Mitutoyo Calipers for Measuring Things

    Autodesk’s 123D Design [for desktop] is a great piece of free software that has an easy to use UI. Don’t let the simple interface intimate you, it can be a pretty power modeling tool. To get a breakdown of navigating around an object and an overview on features and tools, check out the autodesk 123d design youtube playlist.

    Autodesk 123D Design - 3D Modeling  enclosures for DIY Projects

    Let’s start off by creating a simple box from the primitives menu. When you select the box icon and move the mouse cursor over the canvas grid, enter a value for length, width, and the height of your desired project enclosure.

    Autodesk 123D Design - Adding Fillet

    Add a fillet to the edges to round them out by highlighting each side of the object. Hover over the floating gearing icon and select the Fillet feature. Enter a value to make the edges all round and nice like.

    Autodesk 123D Design - Shelling Objects for 3D Printing

    Highlight the top face of the box and choose the Shell feature. Enter 1.5 in the input box to make our project box 1.5mm thick.

    123D Design - Duplicate Covers

    Create a 1mm thick box with the same dimensions of the first box and make two duplicates of the object. This will make up our cover or lid that will snap onto the project box. Move the second copy above the first one so they’re separated.

    123D Design - Shell Duplicate Cover

    Highlight the top and bottom faces of the copy and shell it out by 1.5 mm. By selecting the top and bottom faces, it creates a frame.

    123D Design - Subtract From New Duplicate

    Create a new copy of the cover and move it up exactly in place with the framed out cover. Use the combine feature to subtract the frame from the new duplicate making a 1.5mm thinner cover copy.

    123D Designer - Trimmed Cover Copy

    Select the top and bottom faces of the trimmer cover copy and create a new shell with a 1mm thickness.

    123D Design - Shell Subtracted Cover

    Move the shelled frame down towards the original cover where the two intersect.

    123D Design - Combine Frame to Cover

    Use the combine join feature to merge the frame with the cover.

    123D Design - Positioned Parts

    Position the cover next to the box and ensure they’re both equally level to the grid. When you export these out as an STL, you’ll need to set the reset position of each axis so it prints in the middle of your build platform.

    Pleasant3D Quickly Center Object

    You can use a free app like Pleasant3D to quickly make this modification. Open it up and select the Center Object button, save and thats it! You can now slice it in Makerware, Replicator G, Slicer or any other slicing app.

    And there you have it! Some basic steps to get your first 3D modeled DIY electronics project started. So the next time you’re thinking about packaging your cool project, why not try 3d pinting. Having the capability to design and make just about anything for your projects is the best reason to own a 3d printer.

    What kind of 3D printed projects would you make if you had a 3D printer? Let us know in the comments below.

    Thanks for reading! Until next time, learn, make, share, repeat.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 08:00
    GoonQuad, an Emotive Quadruped Robot #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    GoonQuad, an Emotive Quadruped Robot:

    This week my students from Computing in the Creative Arts had a public exhibit of their term projects. This project is close to my heart as I worked closely with this particular group of students who despite having very little technical background were deeply passionate about creating an interactive robot capable of expressing emotions and interacting with people.

    The students involved were

    I have submitted this project to the robots and arduino contests. If you like it, your vote is appreciated :)

    I present you “Goon Quad”. In this version, Goon Quad has 4 prerecorded states (“angry”,”party”,”confused”,”breathe”), triggered by the touch of a person in areas specified by the eyebrows and a tattoo that read “Mom”, painted with bare conductive and used as capacitive sensors.

    My students just finished editing their video! Cheer them up with some comments and likes on YouTube :)

    Read More.

    3D printed robot


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 08:00
    Enginursday: Hacking at the Gray Lady

    Last month (March 2014), I was fortunate to travel to New York City to participate in a working group at Columbia University’s Tow (rhymes with “plow” not “stow”)(and what a preposterous language English is) Center for Digital Journalism about the ethics and legality of drones and sensors in journalism. I was there to provide an opinion on the implications of FCC rules for journalists seeking to use drones or sensors as a part of reporting.

    While there, I met Deirdre Sullivan, who is a lawyer on staff at the New York TImes. Over dinner, she told me that the Times has an R&D group that does a lot of interesting hacking, and that they use a lot of SparkFun stuff, and would I like to meet them?

    Team members

    Some of the lab’s employees, L to R: Noah Feehan, Maker; Michael Dewar, Data Scientist; Alexis Lloyd, Creative Director

    Of course, I jumped at the opportunity. Here are some pictures of the projects they’re working on (or have been working on lately).

    Reveal

    This smart mirror project, dubbed “Reveal”, delivers headlines, tracks your medicines and integrates your Fitbit data with your morning grooming rituals. It incorporates a Kinect, RFID and environmental sensors to give you more information that you can possibly digest before you’ve had some coffee.

    Julia

    “Julia” is an interactive food preparation surface that delivers recipes from the Times to your kitchen. Not only does she walk you through the recipe, step by step, she also provides visible locations for all the ingredients (the circles in the picture above) and highlights which ones should be used for the current step. A gesture recognition sensor allows her controls and touchscreen to remain unsullied during even the messiest portions of meal prep.

    Curriculum

    In the “not sure how I feel about this” arena, each member of the group has an OLED display on their monitor that shows a ‘“stream of the topics a group has browsed” or a representation of the group’s information diet’, according to Noah. The project, called “Curriculum”, anonymizes the data and does not monitor https traffic, and the traffic is strictly opt-in. Noah tells me that it’s a great idea stimulator, but it totally wrecked any chance of surprise regarding intra-office Christmas presents.

    Blush

    This little pendant, called “Blush”, is a super-portable front-end for Curriculum. It’s constantly feeding your conversation via BLE to a speech recognition program, which compares your topics of discussion with your Curriculum feed and lights up when you hit on a topic in conversation that correlates with your recent information diet.

    Photo archiving project Lazarus

    The Times maintains a huge archive of old pictures. Many of these pictures are absolutely priceless, and haven’t been digitized yet. A simple one-bit scan of most (all?) issues of the Times exists, but the image quality in those scans is terrible. The R&D group is working on a device, called Lazarus, to automate this process. They can enter publication date information for a picture, place it on the surface and capture an image. The program then retrieves the existing digital copy, finds by image processing the likely matches for the image in question, then swaps the new image into the archive for the older, low res copy.

    Locus

    Finally, my favorite. The parasite-looking thing on Noah’s neck (dubbed “Locus”) connects with others of its kind via embedded Bluetooth and distributed base stations, creating a resilient distributed mesh network, and it warms up when you are close to a place a friend has recently been close to, with the idea being that it reminds you that your share a space, if not a time, with the people you care about. What I like most about it has nothing to do with the intended use, though; Noah tells me that when it warms up it feels exactly like shame.

    I was excited and honored to pay a visit to the New York Times building, and I’m glad that our work is in some way being incorporated into the work done by that amazing and prestigious organization.

    If you want more information about what the NYT R&D Group is doing, you should check out their site, visit their blog, or follow them on Twitter! Thanks for taking the time to show me around, guys!

    comments | comment feed

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 07:00
    Super Shoes Lead The Way

    Super shoe insole with a red sneaker

    Many of us spend so much time looking down at our phones that we miss the world all around us. [Dhairya] hopes to change that with Super Shoes, a pair of enhanced insoles that let your toes do the navigating while you enjoy the sights. Each insole has a Bluetooth radio and a microcontroller. Three coin cell vibrator motors act as an output device under the small toes, while a capacitive touch pad under the big toe handles input. Careful positioning of the electronics keeps the foam insoles flexible.

    Using the shoes is as simple as walking around. Say you needed walking directions. You would set the destination on your smartphone. The shoes would then tie in to your smartphone’s GPS and maps application. From there, it’s simply a matter of following your toes. If the toes on your left foot vibrate, turn left. Vibration on the right foot indicates a right turn. When your destination is at hand, both feet will vibrate rapidly to celebrate.

    [Dhairya] envisions a cloud service called ShoeCentral which will store a database of the user’s likes and dislikes. Based upon this data, ShoeCentral will guide the user to new restaurants or places they may like. All of this and hands free? Where do we sign up?

    Filed under: wearable hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 07:00
    A $50 3D-Printed Prosthesis Compared to a $42,000 Myoelectric Prosthesis #maketheworld #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    A $50 3D-Printed Prosthesis Compared to a $42,000 Myoelectric Prosthesis:

    I recently had the opportunity to work with a great guy named Jose Delgado, Jr., a 53-year old who was born without most of his left hand. I made a 3D printed prosthetic hand for Jose and, after using it for a while, I asked him to give me some honest feedback about how it compares to his more expensive myoelectric prosthesis. This is obviously not an “apples to apples” comparison in terms of the devices, but the real value of a prosthesis comes from how useful it is on a day-to-day basis, and that is the focus of the comparison here.

    This 3D printed prosthesis is a completely mechanical design. There are a series of non-flexible cords running along the underside of each finger, connecting to a “tensioning block” on the top rear of the device (the “gauntlet”). The tension is caused by bending the wrist downward. With the wrist in its natural resting position, the fingers are extended, with a natural inward curve. When the wrist is bent 20-30 degrees downward, the non-flexible cords are pulled, causing the fingers and thumb to bend inwards. A second series of flexible cords run along the tops of the fingers, causing the fingers to return automatically when tension is released….

    Read More.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 07:00
    From the mail bag…


    Mailbag animated
    From the mail bag!

    (Keep in mind this is coming from a mechanical engineer who had to take “Introduction to Electronics” twice…)

    Have no idea where else to post this, but spent some time this weekend with various new components from Adafruit and elsewhere and as I worked my way through various documentation and product pages I realized how much effort and thought has gone into everything. For me, it’s great to have a place to go where nothing is too trivial.

    Thanks to the crew at Adafruit – Nice to have you guys out there doing what you do!

    -vschmidtgvl

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 04:00
    Digispark Pro, The Bigger Smaller Dev Board

    digi

    There has recently been a huge influx of extremely small dev board based on the ATtiny85. This small 8-pin microcontroller is able to run most Arduino sketches,  and the small size and low price of these dev boards means they have been extremely popular. The Digispark was among the first of these small boards, and now the creator is releasing a newer, bigger version dubbed the Digispark Pro.

    The new board isn’t based on the ‘tiny85, but rather the ATtiny167. This larger, 20-pin chip adds 10 more I/O pins, and a real hardware SPI interface, but the best features come with the Digispark Pro package. There’s real USB programming, device emulation, and serial over USB this time, and the ability to use the Arduino serial monitor, something not found in the original Digispark.

    There are also a few more shields this time around, with WiFi and Bluetooth shields available as additional rewards. Without the shields, the Digi Pro is cheap, and only $2 more per board than the original Digispark.

     

    Filed under: ATtiny Hacks, Crowd Funding

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 04:00
    Autonomous Android Phonebot Tracks, Chases Toy Like Housecat

    IOIOAndroidPhoneBotPowerful, cheap, open platform from obsolete phone, OpenCV, Arduino, RC toy.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 4/23/14 (video)




    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 4/23/14 (video).

  • Jeudi, Avril 24, 2014 - 01:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout! 4/23/14 (video) #showandtell

Pages