h:D

Planet

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 17:31
    Intel Galileo Live Show-and-Tell Tonight!

    Galileo-IllustrationTonight at at 9pm ET / 6pm PT, we’re wrapping up Getting Started with Intel Galileo Maker Sessions with a “show-and-tell” Hangout On Air.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 17:16
    Enginursday: Introducing the MicroView!

    I’d like to use my Enginursday post to chat about a new project our SparkFun team is working really hard on these days – something I’m super-excited about – the MicroView!

    The MicroView is a collaborative project between SparkFun and our friends JP, Marcus and Maddy from Geek Ammo, the team behind the Ninja Blocks and Little Bird Electronics.

    The MicroView, like many a brilliant product, began as a prank. When teaching Arduino classes, Marcus was frustrated by the disconnect between what’s going on inside the Arduino and the limited outputs a student can actually visualize. Aside from staring at hypnotizing, scrolling lines of the serial monitor text, there’s really no easy solution to show the data in your Arduino. To first combat this, they came up with the Magpie – an Arduino-compatible board with LEDs on every output – but Marcus asked JP if he knew of an even better solution. To which JP responded with:

    OLEDuino

    *OLEDuino not actually a thing.

    A completely fabricated, photoshopped image of a chip with a built-in OLED display. JP got Marcus hook, line and sinker, and Marcus instantly wanted it! When finding out that he couldn’t purchase this awesome new product, Marcus, not to be let down by JP’s prank, convinced his team to make the MicroView a reality.

    MicroView lit up with SFE Flame

    The Geek Ammo team has put the MicroView up on Kickstarter, and we’ve been working with them along the way, helping where we can with PCB design, part sourcing, manufacturing, and eventually reward fulfillment (this ain’t our first Kickstater rodeo). Check out their Kickstarter video!

    What’s awesome about the MicroView is its utility for electronics beginners and experts alike. For beginners, the MicroView is one of the easiest-to-use Arduino platforms available – it’s perfect for anyone looking for an education in electronics, programming, or Arduino. The integrated display really helps to visualize what the microcontroller is doing (you might say it gives you a view into the microcontroller). The MicroView will even ship with built-in tutorials to help folks get started; and the Geek Ammo team has built a set of cross-platform, interactive tutorials that teach you how to create 11 different circuits.

    uView attached to a photocell

    The MicroView is also great for experienced electronics users. It uses an ATmega328P chip – just like the Arduino Uno – and runs at 5V/16MHz. It breaks out a dozen I/O pins, including six analog inputs (A0-A5) and 3 PWM outputs.

    uView pinout

    The projected pinout of the MicroView.

    I’m personally excited about it because, by using it as a testing and rapid prototyping platform, it’s going to make my job easier. It’ll be especially awesome for testing out motion sensors, GPS modules, wearables, or anything that requires mobility. I’ve already built up a jig to use it to test our new LSM9DS0 9DoF Breakouts:

    Using the MicroView to test the LSM9DS0

    And, of course, the MicroView should have a bright future as the center-piece of finished projects. Smart watches, geo-cache sniffers, mobile breathalyzers…you name a project, I’m sure we’ll see the MicroView integrated into it soon.

    Right now we’re in a prototyping stage with the MicroView. We’ve got some functional boards and enclosures, and (not to brag or anything) I’ve been lucky enough to get to start playing with them testing them out. They’re awesome! If you want to get in early on the action, go back it now on Kickstarter!

    comments | comment feed

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 17:00
    Smart Smoker, the Better Barbecue

    photoSimple modifications that make a better barbeque

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 17:00
    3D Printing Conference: Inside 3D Printing New York April 2nd-4th #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Inside 3D Printing Conference and Expo for Additive Manufacturing Professionals

    If you are in the NYC area this week, check out the
    Inside 3D Printing Conference + Expo at Javits Convention Center – 655 West 34th Street, New York, NY 10001.

    To give you a sense of the experience from last year, below is a video of Maxim Lobovsky, interviewed at the FormLabs booth at last year’s event. Also check out Todd Blatt’s coverage at MAKE, who covered the event from a Maker’s perspective. (And also covered my design for 3D printing talk – thanks!)

    3D printing is revolutionizing manufacturing, enabling new products, and impacting business processes. Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo, has gained a reputation for producing high quality seminars and a wide range exhibitions worldwide. And now another dimension has been added – Maker Summit & Pavilion. Under one roof all levels of 3D Printing interest are covered whether an attendee is interested in the future of bioprinting to making custom jewelry. Also new at Inside 3D Printing is a workshop day (April 2). Inside 3D Printing brings together the 3D printing universe and prepares you to take advantage of “The Third Industrial Revolution”. Don’t miss out! Partake in workshops, seminars for every interest level, networking to explore business opportunities, policy consideration, and the latest 3D printers and services.

    Read More.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:35
    The Auto Parking Mecanum Robot




    The Auto Parking Mecanum Robot.

    A while back, Hackaday visited the Clark Magnet School in Glendale, California to sneak a peek on their STEM-focused curriculum, FIRST robotics club, awesome A/V classroom, and a shop that puts most hackerspaces to shame. We saw a few builds while we were there, but [Jack]‘s auto parking mecanum robot was in a class by itself. It deserves its own Hackaday post, and now that [Jack] is on Hackaday Projects, he’s sharing all the details.

    Learn more.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:02
    Novena – open-hardware computing platform #oshw


    Novena-954-Edit Project-Body
    Novena – open-hardware computing platform @ Crowd Supply.

    A new open-hardware computing platform, flexible and powerful, designed for use as a desktop, laptop, or standalone board.

    Novena is a 1.2GHz, Freescale quad-core ARM architecture computer closely coupled with a Xilinx FPGA. It’s designed for users who care about open source, and/or want to modify and extend their hardware: all the documentation for the PCBs is open and free to download, the entire OS is buildable from source, and it comes with a variety of features that facilitate rapid prototyping.

    Learn more.


    This is a rare post for us, we usually do not post pre-funded crowd source campaigns, however this is from bunnie and xobs, they’ve worked on many Adafruit products/projects and an open source hardware laptop needs to be celebrated :)

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:01
    Peltier Mini-Fridge Preserves Chip Quik, Marriage

    [Charles] uses Chip Quik to solder his SMD parts, and that stuff can keep for more than six months if it’s kept cool. His wife banned all non-food items from their refrigerator, so he had to think fast and came up with this Peltier effect Chip Quik cooler.

    He first looked into that man cave essential, the mini-fridge, but they’re too expensive and use too much power. [Charles] got a nice wooden box from a hobby store and some reflective insulation from Lowe’s. He first tried using a couple of heat sinks but they weren’t going to cool things down enough. Once he got a Peltier cooling kit, he was in business. The temperature in his workshop averages 80°F, and he says the box gets down to 58°F. This is cold enough to keep his paste fresh.

    [Charles] plans to use a PC power supply in the future rather than his bench supply. He estimates that his Peltier cooler uses 25-50% of the power that a mini-fridge would, and now his wife won’t overheat. Many great things can be accomplished with the Peltier effect from air conditioning to sous-vide cooking to LED rings. What have you used it for?

    Filed under: home hacks, lifehacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:00
    Open Source Hardware Hero: “Ultimaker 2″ Printer Source Files Available Online #3DThursday #OpenHardware #opensource #3DPrinting


    Ultimaker2

    Keeping true to its commitment to open hardware and potential for sharing source to revolutionize desktop manufacturing, Ultimaker has finally been able to launch the “Ultimaker 2″ Printer Source Files:

    From day one, we have been recognized for our open source culture and we feel that open source brings the field of 3D printing to a higher level. It is our firm belief that sharing knowledge does not mean losing knowledge. On the contrary, we learn from each other, inspire each other and use each other’s knowledge to create even better products and develop impressive innovations world-wide.

    What sets Ultimaker and YouMagine apart is the sharing philosophy. Since the very first time Ultimaker saw the light of day, we have supported open source. We shared our source files and our community gave us valuable feedback. Our YouMagine platform is not only a place where we share our information, it is also a social place, a community, where users can create profiles and start collaborations with other makers. Many contributions by our community can be found in the Ultimaker design as it is today.

    The day has come that we are launching the drawings of the Ultimaker 2 and share them with the world. We are excited to see what kind of ideas, innovations, improvements and products this will lead to. We will continue to share our knowledge and experience and look forward to achieving many remarkable 3D printing goals together. Or in the words of Martijn Elserman, co-founder of Ultimaker: “Since its introduction, the Ultimaker 2 received a very positive response and its demand has been beyond expectation. This strengthens our confidence in our philosophy to innovate and improve together with the worldwide community of 3D printer enthousiasts.”

    Read More. Get the Ultimaker 2 source files here.

    Ultimaker2Extruder

    Ultimaker2FilamentFeed

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 15:00
    How to 3D Print a 20w Amplifier Box



    You can build an audio project that pumps 20 watts of power with the MAX9744 stereo amplifier. The MAX9744 is a tiny cool-runing class d amplifier requires no heat sink and blasts extremely awesome sound. 5-12volt DC power keeps the amplifier on and you can plug in any stereo line to the headphone jack. This lovely kit includes a power filter capacitor, terminal blocks and a 1k potentiometer to adjust volume. Our 3d printed enclosure houses the components and can be printed in any color to match your style.

    Check out our guide on The Adafruit Learning System for full instructions and circuit diagram.

    Don’t forget to check our thingiverse page for more awesome 3D printed projects.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 15:00
    Making Kaylee’s Fluffy Pink Dress


    kaylee pink dress firefly

    When you normally wear grubby overalls, a fancy dress is a nice change of attire and Kaylee Frye’s dress from “Shindig” is one of the most memorable costumes from Firefly. I couldn’t imagine re-creating all those ruffles, but cosplayer Fire Lily put the entire gown together for $160. She used dupioni silk and lots of white sheer voile fabric – yes, she dyed all the pink and peach layers:

    The second hard part was the skirt – although the costume was said to have used pre-made silk chiffon hoops, chiffon is entirely too flimsy a fabric to get the correct drape for the ruffles, in my opinion. I opted to use a white sheer voile fabric and dye the peach and pink layers. Each layer of ruffles is edged with rolled hems that I had to run through my sewing machine twice using a zig-zag stitch (omg took forever!). I then sewed each layer onto a plain cotton sheath skirt and attached it to the bodice.

    Read more at Fire Lily Cosplay’s blog.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 14:00
    Open Source 3D Printer Designer: Diego Porqueras of Deezmaker on Bukobot and Bukito #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Andrew Mazzotta of 3DHacker shares an in-depth interview with open source 3D printer designer Diego Porqueras of Deezmaker on Bukobot and Bukito:

    Diego Porqueras, the founder of Deezmaker, is known for developing and sourcing the highest quality components in the consumer 3D printing industry. If anyone has operated or “heard” Deezmaker’s printers they’re impressively quiet, solidly engineered to print 10+ materials, and configured for quick upgradability. Some printer features are gold plated nozzles, synchromesh instead of nobby belts, and drive gears designed by aerospace engineers.

    Additionally Diego has a philosophy of keeping “Open Source” a top priority. It’s a path he and his associates want in their daily lives as well. (Well known Whosawhatsis is also part of the development crew at Deezmaker and develops the “Bukito 3D Printer”.)…

    Read More.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:01
    Tearing Down a Cheap External USB Battery

    [cpldcpu] recently received an external USB battery as a promotional gift and thought it would be a good idea to tear it down to see its insides. At first glance, he could see that the device included a USB micro-b socket used as a 5V input (for charging), a USB-A socket for 5V output, a blue LED to indicate active power out and a red one to indicate charging.

    Opening the case revealed that most space was taken up by a 2600mAH ICR18650 Li-Ion battery, connected to a tiny PCB. A close inspection and a little googling allowed [cpldcpu] to identify the main components of the latter: a battery mangement IC, a 2A boost converter, a 3A Schottky diode, a few 2A N-Mosfets, a 300mA 2.5V LDO and an unknown 6-pin IC. It is very interesting to learn that every last one of these components seems to be sourced from China, which may explain why this USB battery is given for free. Do you think they designed it in-house and outsourced the manufacturing, or is this a product Digi-Key simply bought and put their name on?

    Editorial Note: Digi-Key is an advertiser on Hackaday but this post is not part of that sponsorship. Hackaday does not post sponsored content.

    Unrelated video of extremely similar hardware. [Thanks James from comments]

    Filed under: hardware

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:00
    Constructing the Battery Signal Generator

    panelwiringTips for building your own circuits.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:00
    Philips Shines Light on First 3D-Printed Smart Lamp #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Philips3DPrintedSmartLamp

    Philips Shines Light on First 3D-Printed Smart Lamp. From Mashable:

    Philips announced a collection of new products on Friday — from a new app-controlled light bulb to a kinectic-energy-powered light switch — but we’re most entranced by its 3D-printed lamp line.

    The lamp comes in two styles that work with the company’s Hue line, the Entity (pictured above) and the Tempest (pictured below, in pendant form). Users can create lighting effects using more than 16 million color variations on the lamp and control the settings via an accompanying app. Lighting can also be programmed based on the time of day and personal preferences.

    But the price of cool is hefty. The table lamps are $4,445 and the pendant edition is $4,135. The products are available for pre-order on Meethue.com, starting March 31.

    Philips is also launching the Hue tap ($59), a product the company calls the first ever kinetic-powered, web-enabled light switch. If you don’t want to use an app to control Hue bulbs, the light switch sticks to the walls and can be re-applied throughout the house. Users can also program up to four color sequences. It doesn’t need batteries (it requires a bridge that plugs into a home Wi-Fi router) and can control up to 50 Hue bulbs. It will go on sale in North America and Europe this summer….

    Read More.


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 12:00
    How to Bake Scientifically Accurate Cake Planets #3DThursday

    How to Bake Scientifically Accurate Cake Planets:

    Created by self-taught chef Rhiannon from Cakecrumbs, these spherical cakes are scientifically accurate representations of the subsurface on Jupiter and Earth, right from the outer atmosphere down through the crust, mantle, and inner core.

    …If you want to try it yourself, you can find a detailed step-by-step recipe on the CakeCrumbs website. I will definitely be sending this link to my friends when my birthday comes around again! …

    Read More.

    Planet cakes

    Earth cake

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 11:00
    monika horcicova 3D printed the wheel of life #3DxArt #3DThursday #3DScanning #3DPrinting

    Monika horcicova02

    monika horcicova 3D printed the wheel of life:

    made from 3D printed pieces, ‘the wheel of life’ by czechdesigner monika horcicova is a skeletal sculpture that is based on a symbol of infinity. the round structure refers to the repeated cycle of conception and death, with walking legs used to evoke the image of people in motion. the idea explores the fragility of human bones, which despite this are able to carry the weight of the whole human figure during its life. the plaster composite pieces were 3D printed and then placed in a form and casted in a polyurethane resin, the individual pieces were then assembled into a single object….

    Read more.

    Monika horcicova

    Monika horcicova03


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    The Tiny, Awesome Class D Amp

    ClassD

    In one of [Hans Peter]‘s many idle browsing sessions at a manufacturer’s website, he came across a very cool chip – a 10 Watt class D amplifier chip. After the sample order arrived, he quickly put this chip in a box and forgot about it. A year or so later, he was asked to construct a portable boom box kit for a festival. Time to break out that chip and make a small amplifier, it seems.

    The chip in question – a Maxim MAX9768 – is a tiny chip, a 24-pin TQFP with 1mm pitch. Hard to solder freehand, but this chip does have a few cool features. It’s a filterless design, very easy to implement, and perfect for the mono boombox project he was working on. A simple, seven component circuit was laid out on a breadboard and [Hans] got this chip up and running.

    For the festival, a breadboarded circuit wouldn’t do. He needed a better solution, something built on a PCB that would work well as a kit. The requirements included the MAX9768 chip, a guitar preamp, stereo to mono summing, and through-hole parts for easy soldering. The completed board ended up being extremely small - 33.6mm by 22.5mm – and works really great.

    After the festival, [Hans] found a 20 Watt chip and designed an all-SMD version of the board. Just the thing if you ever want to stuff a tiny amplifier into a crevice of a project.

    Filed under: hardware

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced #3DxMusic #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedTrombone

    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced:

    It’s official! The winners of the Reddit r/3Dprinting March musical instrument contest have been announced.

    Congratulations to all the winners, and thanks to all the participants, the moderators, the team over at Bld3r.com (the open source object sharing site where submissions were posted), and of course the entire r/3Dprinting community.

    You can see the original contest here. And don’t forget to check out some of the previous contests.

    We were so impressed by all the submissions, however there could only be three winners.

    After weeks of voting, including input from the LulzBot team and of course the moderators and several judges, the winners are as follows:

    1st Place

    2nd Place

    3rd Place

    Read more.

    3DPrintedUkelele

    TheLEDMan

    Reddit


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    Lulzbot

    LulzBot TAZ – Open source 3D Printer: The evolution of desktop 3D printing continues with TAZ 3, LulzBot’s top-of-the-line, highest quality printer to date. Merging technical expertise with design sensibilities, TAZ is for inventors, entrepreneurs, design engineers and prototypers — bring your ideas to life with TAZ.” (read more)

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 09:00
    Candles with a 3D printer & scanner #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning

    70YearsCandles

    Christian Lölkes shares a helpful tutorial for creating candles with a 3D printer & scanner:

    The CEO at my student job turned 70. Having a 3D printer & scanner at work there was only one thing to do: make candles.

    Why not print the mold directly?

    1. I don’t have any ABS. I tried once and i didn’t like it. Wax melts at about 60°C and PLA gets soft at the same temperature.
    2. Even if you have ABS i recommend you to use a silicone mold. It will last longer and is soft and flexible. With this complex structure you need a flexible mold in order to remove the candle without damaging it.

    What do you need

    • A 3d model. If you have a Kinect (or similar) and a good computer with the right GPU you can scan yourself (with the help of your friends/brother or your mom). Maybe a nearby hackerspace can help you. I did it with ReconstructMe and a PC-Kinect.
    • A 3d printer. If you don’t have one you can order a print online or go to your local hackerspace/fablab to print one (don’t forget to bring some beer).
    • Silicone mold mass. You can get it for 40€/kg on the internet or at some hardware stores.
    • Old candles or wax (+ color) and candle wick. I got 10cm long wicks with a little metal base plate: perfect.
    • Time.

    Read More.

    3DPrintedCandleMold

    Candlemolds


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 08:00
    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman #3DxMedicine #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedSkull

    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman, from NBC News:

    Doctors in the Netherlands report that they have for the first time successfully replaced most of a human’s skull with a 3-D printed plastic one — and likely saved a woman’s life in the process.

    The 23-hour surgery took place three months ago at University Medical Center Utrecht. The hospital announced details of the groundbreaking operation this week and said the patient, a 22-year-old woman, is doing just fine.

    The woman, whose name wasn’t released, suffered from severe headaches due to a thickening of her skull. She slowly lost her vision, her motor coordination was suffering and it was only a matter of time before other essential brain functions would have atrophied, Verweij said in a press release issued by UMC Utrecht.

    Verweij noted that in some brain operations it’s common for part of the skull to be temporarily removed to reduce pressure on the brain, then put back later or replaced by an artificial implant. In this case, doctors inserted nearly an entire plastic skull that was manufactured with the help of Anatomics, an Australian medical device company that specializes in 3-D printing.

    “We used to create an implant by hand in the operating theater using a kind of cement, but those implants did not have a very good fit,” Verweij said. “Now we can use 3-D printing to ensure that these components are an exact fit. This has major advantages, not only cosmetically but also because patients often have better brain function compared with the old method.”

    Three months after surgery, the woman’s pain is gone and she can see again….

    Read more.

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