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Planet

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 04:00
    Happiness Is Just A Flaming Oxy-Fuel Torch Away

    The Egg-Bot is pretty awesome, we must say. But if you have one, you end up with lot of delicate, round things rolling around your abode and getting underfoot. Warmer weather is just around the corner, so segue from spring gaiety to hot fun in the summertime with the MarshMallowMatic kit from [Evil Mad Scientist].

    The MarshMallowMatic is a CNC oxy-fuel precision marshmallow toaster based on the Ostrich Egg-Bot design. Constructed from flame-retardant plywood, it is sure to add an element of delicious danger to children’s birthday parties and weekend wingdings alike. You don’t have to get too specific with those BYOM invitations because this bad boy will torch standard and jumbo marshmallows like a boss.

    The kit includes a 5000°F oxy-fuel torch and a 20 ft³ oxygen tank, but the tank comes empty and you’ll have to supply your own propane, acetylene,  or hydrogen. It comes with adapters to fit disposable propane and MAPP cylinders, which are also not included. However, you will receive a fine selection of sample marshmallows to get you started. Watch the MarshMallowMatic fire up some happiness after the break. You could toast a special message and load it into this face-tracking confectionery cannon to show how much you care.

    Filed under: cnc hacks, cooking hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER + POPULAR MECHANICS Wednesday night 8pm ET 4/2/2014 – Special guest Jerry Beilinson!
  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout!
  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:00
    3D Printed Split Saves Baby’s Life

    3D-printed-breathing-device-2a

    Here’s another heartwarming story about how 3D printers are continuing to make a real difference in the medical world. [Garrett] is just a baby whose bronchi collapse when breathing — he’s been on a ventilator for most of his life – Until now.

    [Scott Hollister] is a professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, as well as being an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan. Between him and [Doctor Glen Green], an associate professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology, they have created a bioresorbable device that could save little [Garrett's] life.

    By taking CT scans of [Garrett's] bronchi and trachea, they were able to create a 3D model and design a “splint” to help support the bronchi from collapsing during normal breathing. If all goes well, within 3 years, the splint will dissolve in his body and he will be able to breath normally for good. The material in question is a biopolymer called polycaprolactone, which they were actually granted emergency clearance from the FDA to use for [Garrett]. They used an EOS SLS based 3D printer.

    The surgery was successful, and [Garrett] is now on the road to recovery. Stick around for a few videos showing of the printing process and surgery.

    And [Garrett's] story:

    [Thanks Paul!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:00
    3D Printed Splint Saves Baby’s Life

    3D-printed-breathing-device-2a

    Here’s another heartwarming story about how 3D printers are continuing to make a real difference in the medical world. [Garrett] is just a baby whose bronchi collapse when breathing — he’s been on a ventilator for most of his life – Until now.

    [Scott Hollister] is a professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, as well as being an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan. Between him and [Doctor Glen Green], an associate professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology, they have created a bioresorbable device that could save little [Garrett's] life.

    By taking CT scans of [Garrett's] bronchi and trachea, they were able to create a 3D model and design a “splint” to help support the bronchi from collapsing during normal breathing. If all goes well, within 3 years, the splint will dissolve in his body and he will be able to breath normally for good. The material in question is a biopolymer called polycaprolactone, which they were actually granted emergency clearance from the FDA to use for [Garrett]. They used an EOS SLS based 3D printer.

    The surgery was successful, and [Garrett] is now on the road to recovery. Stick around for a few videos showing of the printing process and surgery.

    And [Garrett's] story:

    [Thanks Paul!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:24
    How to Cut Heatshrink and Wire to Precise Lengths Quickly and Cheaply

    heatshrinktop Laziness that motivates efficiency is a virtue.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:15
    Attention all Lego Hackers!

    7196376000_53798465db_oMindstorms Week at MAKE is coming up! What are YOU building?

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:02
    [Bunnie] Launches the Novena Open Laptop

    Novena Laptop

    Today [Bunnie] is announcing the launch of the Novena Open Laptop. When we first heard he was developing an open source laptop as a hobby project, we hoped we’d see the day where we could have our own. Starting today, you can help crowdfund the project by pre-ordering a Novena.

    The Novena is based on the i.MX6Q ARM processor from Freescale, coupled to a Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA. Combined with the open nature of the project, this creates a lot of possibilities for using the laptop as a hacking tool. It has dual ethernet, for routing or sniffing purposes. USB OTG support lets the laptop act as a USB device, for USB fuzzing and spoofing. There’s even a high speed expansion bus to interface with whatever peripheral you’d like to design.

    You can pre-order the Novena in four models. The $500 “just the board” release has no case, but includes all the hardware needed to get up and running. The $1,195 ”All-in-One Desktop” model adds a case and screen, and hinges open to reveal the board for easy hacking. Next up is the $1,995 “Laptop” which includes a battery control board and a battery pack. Finally, there’s the $5000 “Heirloom Laptop” featuring a wood and aluminum case and a Thinkpad keyboard.

    The hardware design files are already available, so you can drool over them. It will be interesting to see what people start doing with this powerful, open computer once it ships. After the break, check out the launch video.

    Filed under: ARM, Crowd Funding, hardware

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:37
    A Rocket Launcher running on Arduino

    rocketlauncher

     

    When chall2009 was a kid, he loved playing with Estes Rockets:

    So I decided to get back into the hobby but using all of my maker skizzls. So here’s a really cool Arduino Rocket Launcher launching 3D Printed rockets from my MakerBot Rep2! Enjoy! Fully Open Source for anyone to make!

     

    rocketLauncher.jpg

     

    Full Assembly and Launch Instructions are on Instructables, Arduino code is on Github and the 3d files for the rockets are downloadable from Thingiverse!

    makerbot_rocket

     

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:30
    The World’s First Open Source Laptop Makes its Debut

    novena-954-edit_project-bodyA computer only a hacker could love.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:10
    Boost Your BeagleBone Black with Breakout Board

    Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 12.04.08 PMMaking a PCB is easier than you might expect.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:00
    Leia On Hoth Costume

    hoth leia

    Some fandoms have dedicated costuming groups, and that means plenty of reference material and tutorials are online for costumes. Star Wars is a perfect example. It seems like every outfit from the saga has been carefully documented at The Padawan’s Guide. They provide images, links to tutorials and resources, and so much more. I focused on Hoth Leia since that’s my favorite costume of the self-rescuing princess and ended up at Audrey’s blog. She documented everything from making the jumpsuit to the vest to the accessories and props. Here’s what she did to dye the jumpsuit to make it more closely match the white we see on screen in The Empire Strikes Back:

    We spent hours dyeing trial swatches of the cotton blend suit and silk vest in taupe and tan dye. We started with a half-teaspoon of RIT powder dye in a large washer load of water, and were down to a quarter-teaspoon by the time we quit yesterday. I had no idea the stuff was so concentrated! Scott suggested we try the liquid dye to get more consistent color, since we were using such small amounts that there was no way to know if the color grains were evenly distributed. Today we started with half as much of the liquid dye, thinking it was twice as strong as the powder, but it turned out to be only half as strong. So we went back to a half-teaspoon. The color was a lot more even and less pink than with the powder, especially on the silk.

    In the final load, we upped the amount of dye another “dash” (eighth-teaspoon; Pandora’s measuring spoons are actually labeled this way!) since there would be a lot more fabric in the load. It didn’t look like dyeing; it looked like washing clothes in well-water, tinted yellow from too much iron. Still, we ran an extra rinse (I think the “dash” may have been a “pinch” too much!) before drying the jumpsuit.

    Read more about making a Hoth Leia costume at The Padawan’s Guide.

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:29
    NYCResistor and Brooklyn Ballet

    Nick and Sayaka Vermeer, Olivia Barr, and William Ward have been working hard for the past couple weeks on an exciting project with the Brooklyn Ballet. We are transforming the dancers’ costumes into interactive performance pieces. Our contribution consists of six LED snowfall tutus for the ballerinas, one Pexel shirt for Mike “Supreme” Fields and six sparkling LED hair accessories for the young ballerinas. The dancers will be performing the snow scene from the Nutcracker in the Brooklyn Ballet‘s Vectors, Marys, and Snow performance from April 3rd to April 13th. Please support the project through our Kickstarter! There you can also watch an interview with Nick and Lynn Parkerson, founding artistic director and choreographer of Brooklyn Ballet. We’d really appreciate your donation to further our work! All our hardware designs and code are open source, and we hope to see more creative works mixing technology and dance.

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Snowfall Tutus: To accomplish the snowfall/glitter efffect we’ve added LED lights, motion sensors, and custom coded/fabricated microcontrollers to the tutus. The sensor we used is called an accelerometer and its placed at the waist of the corset. It reacts with with movement of the dancer by increasing the amount and brightness of the LEDs with more vigorous movement from the dancer. Nick found a remarkably strong ultra flex 36 gauge silicone wire thats perfect for the supple construction of the tutus and its become a standard material at NYC Resistor for wearables. The wire connects 24 neopixels that are broken down into 6 strands of 4 pixels in each tutu. Special thanks to Max Henstell and Adam Mayer for helping in production. Take a look at this amazing video of our twinkling Tutu!

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Pexel Shirt: Pexel Shirt is custom made for the dancer Mike “Supreme” Fields and is designed to interact with his pecks and arms. Mike is a popping artist and his dancing incorporates the flexing of muscle groups to create surface movement on his body. The shirt is activated by individual accelerometer sensors placed over his muscles that illuminate the LEDs through a Flora microcontroller. There are four sensors total, one on each peck and each wrist. When he flexes an individual peck it lights up. The lights on his arms are controlled by moving his wrists up/down or right/left. The entire piece is hand sewn including stitches in between individual pixel on the arm strands for optimum elasticity while still being secure. Watch the Mike in action here: Mike “Supreme” Fields

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Sparkle Hair Clips: To accent the young ballerina’s costume we designed an LED accent on a hair clip. The clip uses a Gemma microcontroller and a strand of neopixels. The clear acrylic beads on the clip filter the LEDs and sparkle.

    Please come out and see the show at the Brooklyn Ballet April 3rd – 13th and support our Kickstarter to fund the project!

    Ballet Hacks A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled." A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled." Rat's Nest

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:06
    NEW PRODUCT – 20W 4 Ohm Full Range Speaker – Sony XS-GTF1027

    1732 components

    NEW PRODUCT – 20W 4 Ohm Full Range Speaker – Sony XS-GTF1027: Listen up! This high power 4″ diameter speaker will amp up any audio project where you need loud sound! It is 4 ohm impedance, rated for 30W continuous power. (This thing is really loud) It also has four handy mounting tabs 3 inches apart, and a grill that fits on top. The grill is to protect the cones, and is not necessary for use.

    1732 cover

    This speaker has a nice wide range of 60Hz – 24kHz, which is pretty good for a speaker this large. Originally designed for use in car doors, but we think its good for any project where you need to fill a room. We played some David Bowie through two of these speakers using our MAX9744 amplifier running from 12V power and it could easily fill 5,000 sq ft with sound. For best use, place into some sort of enclosed cabinet.

    1732 top nocover

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:01
    Boxing + Arduino + Geometry = Awesomeness

    arduino-boxing-blocker

    Imagine a machine that [Anderson Silva] could throw a punch at, that would locate his fist in real time and move a punching pad to meet his moving fist. How would you do it? Kinect? Super huge sensor array? Sticking charm? What if we told you it could be done with two electret microphones, an Arduino, and a Gumstix? Yeah, that’s right. You might want to turn your phone off and sit down for this one.

    [Benjamin] and his fellow students developed this brilliant proof of concept design that blocks incoming punches for their final project. We’ve seen boxing robots here before, but this one takes the cake. The details are sparse, but we’ve dug into what was made available to us and have a relatively good idea on how they pulled off this awesome piece of electrical engineering.

    Consider two microphones fixed to both ends of an axis. Then consider a tone generator that could move back and forth on the same axis. The amplitude of the waveform coming off of each microphone would be inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the microphones and the tone generator. Put more simply – the amplitudes would follow the inverse square law. These value’s, multiplied by a constant, can be used to represent the radius (r) of a circle, from which a circle equation (x2 + y2 = r2) can be derived. Because there are two microphones, there are two circles. Or more specifically, two values of (r), which we will call (r1) and (r2).

     

     

    boxing01

     

    [Benjamin's] mission was to pinpoint the exact location of the tone generator source (which is attached to the punching glove) and move a target to intercept it. After amplification, the signals from each microphone are fed into an Arduino, where they are averaged. He then sends the peak data to a Gumstix via I2C. One could probably get a rough idea of where the tone generator was from this data alone. But [Benjamin] and his team wanted an exact location, and used what is known as the Circle-Circle Intersection equation that runs as a algorithm in the Gumstix. This gives him the precise location on the axis where the two circles meet, and thus the location of the tone generator source. From this point, it’s relatively simple to move the guard (part that blocks the punch) to the location. An IR sensor is used to determine the current location of the guard, and the Gumstix moves it to the punch location via PWM and an H bridge. Brilliant!

    We’ve stepped through the math to demonstrate exactly how the Circle-Circle Intersection algorithm is solving the location. You can count the squares to represent data. The answer of 2.6 is the distance from the center of the smaller circle to the intersection point. You can get the distance from the larger circle to the intersection point simply by swapping (r) and (R) in the equation. Try it!

     

    boxing04

    This technique of determining the location of a moving object along a single axis is bound to come in handy for other hacks.

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, ARM, robots hacks

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:00
    The Mint-box Piezo Buffer

    Mint-Box-Buffer

    The Mint-box Piezo Buffer.

    Piezo pickups are definitely useful, but they have one really serious problem: Impedance matching. Having an impedance mismatch is like having your car in the wrong gear, and piezos really need to see a very high input impedance to sound good. If a piezo has to drive a low impedance the sound will lose a lot of low end and also sound bad in the mids and highs. There are a variety of good “acoustic” preamps available to help with this, including built-in electronics and floor units. Trouble is, they’re expensive and usually include EQ and effects you may not need. Not all piezo pickups need this kind of buffer, but I’ve run across a decent number that do.

    Often enough I’ve done sound for musicians with just this problem, so I finally ended up building a few very simple, very cheap buffer boxes that I could carry in my bag and even sell cheaply if a musician wanted to have one. It runs off a 9 volt battery, uses a single FET (field effect transistor) and a few other parts, and can be mounted inside one of those little tin mint boxes.

    Learn more, thanks Jay!

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 21:12
    Adafruit LED Sequins (video) #WearableWednesday

    Sew a little sparkle into your wearable project with Adafruit LED Sequins. These are the kid-sister to our popular Flora NeoPixel– they only show a single color and they aren’t addressable, but they are our smallest sewable LEDs ever and very easy to use!

    sequinshat

    Learn to make a glowing hat with GEMMA inside the LED Sequins guide on the Adafruit Learning System, and get stitching!

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 19:36
    New Project: Hidden Message Zombie Detector

    Zombie Detector 132Use a slave flash to briefly illuminate a hidden message.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 19:01
    MSP430-Based CTF Hardware Hacking Challenge

    Hardware 'Flag'

    Hacking conferences often feature a Capture the Flag, or CTF event. Typically, this is a software hacking challenge that involves breaking into targets which have been set up for the event, and capturing them. It’s good, legal, hacking fun.

    However, some people are starting to build CTFs that involve hardware hacking as well. [Balda]‘s most recent hardware hacking challenge was built for the Insomni’hack 2014 CTF. It uses an MSP430 as the target device, and users are allowed to enter commands to the device over UART via a Bus Pirate. Pull off the exploit, and the wheel rotates to display a flag.

    For the first challenge, contestants had to decompile the firmware and find an obfuscated password. The second challenge was a bit more complicated. The password check function used memcpy, which made it vulnerable to a buffer overflow attack. By overwriting the program counter, it was possible to take over control of the program and make the flag turn.

    The risk of memcpy reminds us of this set of posters. Only abstaining from memcpy can 100% protect you from overflows and memory disclosures!

     

    Filed under: security hacks

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 19:00
    Wearable Electronics with Becky Stern 04/2/2014 – LIVE 2pm ET

    Join Becky Stern and friends every week as we delve into the wonderful world of wearables, live on YouTube. We’ll answer your questions, announce a discount code for the Adafruit store, and explore wearable components, techniques, special materials, tools, and projects you can build at home! Ask your wearables questions in the comments, and if your question is featured on a future episode, you’ll be entered to win the show giveaway!

    Show links:

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