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Planet

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    The Tiny, Awesome Class D Amp

    ClassD

    In one of [Hans Peter]‘s many idle browsing sessions at a manufacturer’s website, he came across a very cool chip – a 10 Watt class D amplifier chip. After the sample order arrived, he quickly put this chip in a box and forgot about it. A year or so later, he was asked to construct a portable boom box kit for a festival. Time to break out that chip and make a small amplifier, it seems.

    The chip in question – a Maxim MAX9768 – is a tiny chip, a 24-pin TQFP with 1mm pitch. Hard to solder freehand, but this chip does have a few cool features. It’s a filterless design, very easy to implement, and perfect for the mono boombox project he was working on. A simple, seven component circuit was laid out on a breadboard and [Hans] got this chip up and running.

    For the festival, a breadboarded circuit wouldn’t do. He needed a better solution, something built on a PCB that would work well as a kit. The requirements included the MAX9768 chip, a guitar preamp, stereo to mono summing, and through-hole parts for easy soldering. The completed board ended up being extremely small - 33.6mm by 22.5mm – and works really great.

    After the festival, [Hans] found a 20 Watt chip and designed an all-SMD version of the board. Just the thing if you ever want to stuff a tiny amplifier into a crevice of a project.

    Filed under: hardware

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced #3DxMusic #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedTrombone

    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced:

    It’s official! The winners of the Reddit r/3Dprinting March musical instrument contest have been announced.

    Congratulations to all the winners, and thanks to all the participants, the moderators, the team over at Bld3r.com (the open source object sharing site where submissions were posted), and of course the entire r/3Dprinting community.

    You can see the original contest here. And don’t forget to check out some of the previous contests.

    We were so impressed by all the submissions, however there could only be three winners.

    After weeks of voting, including input from the LulzBot team and of course the moderators and several judges, the winners are as follows:

    1st Place

    2nd Place

    3rd Place

    Read more.

    3DPrintedUkelele

    TheLEDMan

    Reddit


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    Lulzbot

    LulzBot TAZ – Open source 3D Printer: The evolution of desktop 3D printing continues with TAZ 3, LulzBot’s top-of-the-line, highest quality printer to date. Merging technical expertise with design sensibilities, TAZ is for inventors, entrepreneurs, design engineers and prototypers — bring your ideas to life with TAZ.” (read more)

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 09:00
    Candles with a 3D printer & scanner #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning

    70YearsCandles

    Christian Lölkes shares a helpful tutorial for creating candles with a 3D printer & scanner:

    The CEO at my student job turned 70. Having a 3D printer & scanner at work there was only one thing to do: make candles.

    Why not print the mold directly?

    1. I don’t have any ABS. I tried once and i didn’t like it. Wax melts at about 60°C and PLA gets soft at the same temperature.
    2. Even if you have ABS i recommend you to use a silicone mold. It will last longer and is soft and flexible. With this complex structure you need a flexible mold in order to remove the candle without damaging it.

    What do you need

    • A 3d model. If you have a Kinect (or similar) and a good computer with the right GPU you can scan yourself (with the help of your friends/brother or your mom). Maybe a nearby hackerspace can help you. I did it with ReconstructMe and a PC-Kinect.
    • A 3d printer. If you don’t have one you can order a print online or go to your local hackerspace/fablab to print one (don’t forget to bring some beer).
    • Silicone mold mass. You can get it for 40€/kg on the internet or at some hardware stores.
    • Old candles or wax (+ color) and candle wick. I got 10cm long wicks with a little metal base plate: perfect.
    • Time.

    Read More.

    3DPrintedCandleMold

    Candlemolds


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 08:00
    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman #3DxMedicine #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedSkull

    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman, from NBC News:

    Doctors in the Netherlands report that they have for the first time successfully replaced most of a human’s skull with a 3-D printed plastic one — and likely saved a woman’s life in the process.

    The 23-hour surgery took place three months ago at University Medical Center Utrecht. The hospital announced details of the groundbreaking operation this week and said the patient, a 22-year-old woman, is doing just fine.

    The woman, whose name wasn’t released, suffered from severe headaches due to a thickening of her skull. She slowly lost her vision, her motor coordination was suffering and it was only a matter of time before other essential brain functions would have atrophied, Verweij said in a press release issued by UMC Utrecht.

    Verweij noted that in some brain operations it’s common for part of the skull to be temporarily removed to reduce pressure on the brain, then put back later or replaced by an artificial implant. In this case, doctors inserted nearly an entire plastic skull that was manufactured with the help of Anatomics, an Australian medical device company that specializes in 3-D printing.

    “We used to create an implant by hand in the operating theater using a kind of cement, but those implants did not have a very good fit,” Verweij said. “Now we can use 3-D printing to ensure that these components are an exact fit. This has major advantages, not only cosmetically but also because patients often have better brain function compared with the old method.”

    Three months after surgery, the woman’s pain is gone and she can see again….

    Read more.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 07:00
    An Oculus Rift Hack That Lets You Draw in 3-D #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    An Oculus Rift Hack That Lets You Draw in 3-D:

    A group of Royal College of Art students–Guillaume Couche, Daniela Paredes Fuentes, Pierre Paslier, and Oluwaseyi Sosanya–has developed a tool called GravitySketch that starts tracing an outline of how these systems could work as creative tools.

    Their high-tech sketchpad looks a bit like a prop from Tron, with its etched grid of transparent plastic and sternly rectilinear user interface panel, but the goal is to make augmented reality feel as natural and organic as sketching in a notebook. Artists hold the acrylic drawing tablet like its analog counterpart and sketch with a custom stylus. Radio frequency sensors record the movements and coordinates on the pad and send them to an Arduino hidden in the black box on its edge. No lines are actually drawn on the pad, but the artist sees them float in air through a pair of augmented reality glasses wirelessly connected to the Arduino.

    The goal was to create tools that would privilege spatial awareness.
    The real trick of GravitySketch is that, rather than requiring artists to master tricks like perspective or foreshortening to suggest depth and physicality, they can simply rotate the tablet and draw lines that connect to their previous marks, creating a sense of form in the process. The drawings hang in space, can be approached from any angle, and can be rotated like physical objects.

    A solo sketch can quickly become a jam session if several people surround the drawing, allowing people to collaborate in real time with none of the loss that comes from sharing ideas asynchronously and in traditional formats.

    Customized software was developed by the team using the game engine Unity 3D. “We wanted, from the beginning, to have a very minimal user interface,” says Couche. “The four of us are users of the conventional CAD tools and having something simple that does not requires you to become an expert in order to create was on strong driver for us.” That’s not to say the tools are unsophisticated and sketches drawn in the virtual world can be transformed into 3-D printed objects with ease….

    Read more.

    Oculus

    Oculus03


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 07:00
    Arduino Controlled Dahlander Motor Switch

     

    Dahlander Switch

    [Jean-Noel] is fixing a broken Lurem woodworking machine. This machine uses a three-phase Dahlander motor, which has three operation modes: stop, half speed, and full speed. The motor uses a special mechanical switch to select the operating mode. Unfortunately, the mechanical bits inside the switch were broken, and the motor couldn’t be turned on.

    To solve the problem without sourcing a new switch, [Jean-Noel] built his own Arduino based Dahlander switch. This consists of three relays that select the wiring configuration for each speed mode. There’s also a button to toggle settings, and two lamps to show what mode the motor is currently in.

    The Arduino runs a finite-state machine (FSM), ensuring that the device transitions through the modes in the correct order. This is quite important, since the motor could be damaged if certain restrictions aren’t followed. The state machine graph was generated using Fizzim, a free tool that generates not only FSM graphs, but also Verilog and VHDL code for the machines.

    The final product is housed in a DIN rail case, which allows it to be securely mounted along with the rest of the wiring. The detailed write-up on this project explains all the details of the motor, and the challenges of building this replacement switch.

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, tool hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 04:00
    Happiness Is Just A Flaming Oxy-Fuel Torch Away

    The Egg-Bot is pretty awesome, we must say. But if you have one, you end up with lot of delicate, round things rolling around your abode and getting underfoot. Warmer weather is just around the corner, so segue from spring gaiety to hot fun in the summertime with the MarshMallowMatic kit from [Evil Mad Scientist].

    The MarshMallowMatic is a CNC oxy-fuel precision marshmallow toaster based on the Ostrich Egg-Bot design. Constructed from flame-retardant plywood, it is sure to add an element of delicious danger to children’s birthday parties and weekend wingdings alike. You don’t have to get too specific with those BYOM invitations because this bad boy will torch standard and jumbo marshmallows like a boss.

    The kit includes a 5000°F oxy-fuel torch and a 20 ft³ oxygen tank, but the tank comes empty and you’ll have to supply your own propane, acetylene,  or hydrogen. It comes with adapters to fit disposable propane and MAPP cylinders, which are also not included. However, you will receive a fine selection of sample marshmallows to get you started. Watch the MarshMallowMatic fire up some happiness after the break. You could toast a special message and load it into this face-tracking confectionery cannon to show how much you care.

    Filed under: cnc hacks, cooking hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER + POPULAR MECHANICS Wednesday night 8pm ET 4/2/2014 – Special guest Jerry Beilinson!
  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout!
  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:00
    3D Printed Split Saves Baby’s Life

    3D-printed-breathing-device-2a

    Here’s another heartwarming story about how 3D printers are continuing to make a real difference in the medical world. [Garrett] is just a baby whose bronchi collapse when breathing — he’s been on a ventilator for most of his life – Until now.

    [Scott Hollister] is a professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, as well as being an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan. Between him and [Doctor Glen Green], an associate professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology, they have created a bioresorbable device that could save little [Garrett's] life.

    By taking CT scans of [Garrett's] bronchi and trachea, they were able to create a 3D model and design a “splint” to help support the bronchi from collapsing during normal breathing. If all goes well, within 3 years, the splint will dissolve in his body and he will be able to breath normally for good. The material in question is a biopolymer called polycaprolactone, which they were actually granted emergency clearance from the FDA to use for [Garrett]. They used an EOS SLS based 3D printer.

    The surgery was successful, and [Garrett] is now on the road to recovery. Stick around for a few videos showing of the printing process and surgery.

    And [Garrett's] story:

    [Thanks Paul!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:00
    3D Printed Splint Saves Baby’s Life

    3D-printed-breathing-device-2a

    Here’s another heartwarming story about how 3D printers are continuing to make a real difference in the medical world. [Garrett] is just a baby whose bronchi collapse when breathing — he’s been on a ventilator for most of his life – Until now.

    [Scott Hollister] is a professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, as well as being an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan. Between him and [Doctor Glen Green], an associate professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology, they have created a bioresorbable device that could save little [Garrett's] life.

    By taking CT scans of [Garrett's] bronchi and trachea, they were able to create a 3D model and design a “splint” to help support the bronchi from collapsing during normal breathing. If all goes well, within 3 years, the splint will dissolve in his body and he will be able to breath normally for good. The material in question is a biopolymer called polycaprolactone, which they were actually granted emergency clearance from the FDA to use for [Garrett]. They used an EOS SLS based 3D printer.

    The surgery was successful, and [Garrett] is now on the road to recovery. Stick around for a few videos showing of the printing process and surgery.

    And [Garrett's] story:

    [Thanks Paul!]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:24
    How to Cut Heatshrink and Wire to Precise Lengths Quickly and Cheaply

    heatshrinktop Laziness that motivates efficiency is a virtue.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:15
    Attention all Lego Hackers!

    7196376000_53798465db_oMindstorms Week at MAKE is coming up! What are YOU building?

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 00:02
    [Bunnie] Launches the Novena Open Laptop

    Novena Laptop

    Today [Bunnie] is announcing the launch of the Novena Open Laptop. When we first heard he was developing an open source laptop as a hobby project, we hoped we’d see the day where we could have our own. Starting today, you can help crowdfund the project by pre-ordering a Novena.

    The Novena is based on the i.MX6Q ARM processor from Freescale, coupled to a Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA. Combined with the open nature of the project, this creates a lot of possibilities for using the laptop as a hacking tool. It has dual ethernet, for routing or sniffing purposes. USB OTG support lets the laptop act as a USB device, for USB fuzzing and spoofing. There’s even a high speed expansion bus to interface with whatever peripheral you’d like to design.

    You can pre-order the Novena in four models. The $500 “just the board” release has no case, but includes all the hardware needed to get up and running. The $1,195 ”All-in-One Desktop” model adds a case and screen, and hinges open to reveal the board for easy hacking. Next up is the $1,995 “Laptop” which includes a battery control board and a battery pack. Finally, there’s the $5000 “Heirloom Laptop” featuring a wood and aluminum case and a Thinkpad keyboard.

    The hardware design files are already available, so you can drool over them. It will be interesting to see what people start doing with this powerful, open computer once it ships. After the break, check out the launch video.

    Filed under: ARM, Crowd Funding, hardware

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:37
    A Rocket Launcher running on Arduino

    rocketlauncher

     

    When chall2009 was a kid, he loved playing with Estes Rockets:

    So I decided to get back into the hobby but using all of my maker skizzls. So here’s a really cool Arduino Rocket Launcher launching 3D Printed rockets from my MakerBot Rep2! Enjoy! Fully Open Source for anyone to make!

     

    rocketLauncher.jpg

     

    Full Assembly and Launch Instructions are on Instructables, Arduino code is on Github and the 3d files for the rockets are downloadable from Thingiverse!

    makerbot_rocket

     

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:30
    The World’s First Open Source Laptop Makes its Debut

    novena-954-edit_project-bodyA computer only a hacker could love.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:10
    Boost Your BeagleBone Black with Breakout Board

    Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 12.04.08 PMMaking a PCB is easier than you might expect.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 23:00
    Leia On Hoth Costume

    hoth leia

    Some fandoms have dedicated costuming groups, and that means plenty of reference material and tutorials are online for costumes. Star Wars is a perfect example. It seems like every outfit from the saga has been carefully documented at The Padawan’s Guide. They provide images, links to tutorials and resources, and so much more. I focused on Hoth Leia since that’s my favorite costume of the self-rescuing princess and ended up at Audrey’s blog. She documented everything from making the jumpsuit to the vest to the accessories and props. Here’s what she did to dye the jumpsuit to make it more closely match the white we see on screen in The Empire Strikes Back:

    We spent hours dyeing trial swatches of the cotton blend suit and silk vest in taupe and tan dye. We started with a half-teaspoon of RIT powder dye in a large washer load of water, and were down to a quarter-teaspoon by the time we quit yesterday. I had no idea the stuff was so concentrated! Scott suggested we try the liquid dye to get more consistent color, since we were using such small amounts that there was no way to know if the color grains were evenly distributed. Today we started with half as much of the liquid dye, thinking it was twice as strong as the powder, but it turned out to be only half as strong. So we went back to a half-teaspoon. The color was a lot more even and less pink than with the powder, especially on the silk.

    In the final load, we upped the amount of dye another “dash” (eighth-teaspoon; Pandora’s measuring spoons are actually labeled this way!) since there would be a lot more fabric in the load. It didn’t look like dyeing; it looked like washing clothes in well-water, tinted yellow from too much iron. Still, we ran an extra rinse (I think the “dash” may have been a “pinch” too much!) before drying the jumpsuit.

    Read more about making a Hoth Leia costume at The Padawan’s Guide.

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:29
    NYCResistor and Brooklyn Ballet

    Nick and Sayaka Vermeer, Olivia Barr, and William Ward have been working hard for the past couple weeks on an exciting project with the Brooklyn Ballet. We are transforming the dancers’ costumes into interactive performance pieces. Our contribution consists of six LED snowfall tutus for the ballerinas, one Pexel shirt for Mike “Supreme” Fields and six sparkling LED hair accessories for the young ballerinas. The dancers will be performing the snow scene from the Nutcracker in the Brooklyn Ballet‘s Vectors, Marys, and Snow performance from April 3rd to April 13th. Please support the project through our Kickstarter! There you can also watch an interview with Nick and Lynn Parkerson, founding artistic director and choreographer of Brooklyn Ballet. We’d really appreciate your donation to further our work! All our hardware designs and code are open source, and we hope to see more creative works mixing technology and dance.

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Snowfall Tutus: To accomplish the snowfall/glitter efffect we’ve added LED lights, motion sensors, and custom coded/fabricated microcontrollers to the tutus. The sensor we used is called an accelerometer and its placed at the waist of the corset. It reacts with with movement of the dancer by increasing the amount and brightness of the LEDs with more vigorous movement from the dancer. Nick found a remarkably strong ultra flex 36 gauge silicone wire thats perfect for the supple construction of the tutus and its become a standard material at NYC Resistor for wearables. The wire connects 24 neopixels that are broken down into 6 strands of 4 pixels in each tutu. Special thanks to Max Henstell and Adam Mayer for helping in production. Take a look at this amazing video of our twinkling Tutu!

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Pexel Shirt: Pexel Shirt is custom made for the dancer Mike “Supreme” Fields and is designed to interact with his pecks and arms. Mike is a popping artist and his dancing incorporates the flexing of muscle groups to create surface movement on his body. The shirt is activated by individual accelerometer sensors placed over his muscles that illuminate the LEDs through a Flora microcontroller. There are four sensors total, one on each peck and each wrist. When he flexes an individual peck it lights up. The lights on his arms are controlled by moving his wrists up/down or right/left. The entire piece is hand sewn including stitches in between individual pixel on the arm strands for optimum elasticity while still being secure. Watch the Mike in action here: Mike “Supreme” Fields

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

    Sparkle Hair Clips: To accent the young ballerina’s costume we designed an LED accent on a hair clip. The clip uses a Gemma microcontroller and a strand of neopixels. The clear acrylic beads on the clip filter the LEDs and sparkle.

    Please come out and see the show at the Brooklyn Ballet April 3rd – 13th and support our Kickstarter to fund the project!

    Ballet Hacks A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled." A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled." Rat's Nest

    A Photo by William W. Ward, "Untitled."

  • Mercredi, Avril 2, 2014 - 22:06
    NEW PRODUCT – 20W 4 Ohm Full Range Speaker – Sony XS-GTF1027

    1732 components

    NEW PRODUCT – 20W 4 Ohm Full Range Speaker – Sony XS-GTF1027: Listen up! This high power 4″ diameter speaker will amp up any audio project where you need loud sound! It is 4 ohm impedance, rated for 30W continuous power. (This thing is really loud) It also has four handy mounting tabs 3 inches apart, and a grill that fits on top. The grill is to protect the cones, and is not necessary for use.

    1732 cover

    This speaker has a nice wide range of 60Hz – 24kHz, which is pretty good for a speaker this large. Originally designed for use in car doors, but we think its good for any project where you need to fill a room. We played some David Bowie through two of these speakers using our MAX9744 amplifier running from 12V power and it could easily fill 5,000 sq ft with sound. For best use, place into some sort of enclosed cabinet.

    1732 top nocover

    In stock and shipping now!

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