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Planet

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:02
    Novena – open-hardware computing platform #oshw


    Novena-954-Edit Project-Body
    Novena – open-hardware computing platform @ Crowd Supply.

    A new open-hardware computing platform, flexible and powerful, designed for use as a desktop, laptop, or standalone board.

    Novena is a 1.2GHz, Freescale quad-core ARM architecture computer closely coupled with a Xilinx FPGA. It’s designed for users who care about open source, and/or want to modify and extend their hardware: all the documentation for the PCBs is open and free to download, the entire OS is buildable from source, and it comes with a variety of features that facilitate rapid prototyping.

    Learn more.


    This is a rare post for us, we usually do not post pre-funded crowd source campaigns, however this is from bunnie and xobs, they’ve worked on many Adafruit products/projects and an open source hardware laptop needs to be celebrated :)

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:01
    Peltier Mini-Fridge Preserves Chip Quik, Marriage

    [Charles] uses Chip Quik to solder his SMD parts, and that stuff can keep for more than six months if it’s kept cool. His wife banned all non-food items from their refrigerator, so he had to think fast and came up with this Peltier effect Chip Quik cooler.

    He first looked into that man cave essential, the mini-fridge, but they’re too expensive and use too much power. [Charles] got a nice wooden box from a hobby store and some reflective insulation from Lowe’s. He first tried using a couple of heat sinks but they weren’t going to cool things down enough. Once he got a Peltier cooling kit, he was in business. The temperature in his workshop averages 80°F, and he says the box gets down to 58°F. This is cold enough to keep his paste fresh.

    [Charles] plans to use a PC power supply in the future rather than his bench supply. He estimates that his Peltier cooler uses 25-50% of the power that a mini-fridge would, and now his wife won’t overheat. Many great things can be accomplished with the Peltier effect from air conditioning to sous-vide cooking to LED rings. What have you used it for?

    Filed under: home hacks, lifehacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 16:00
    Open Source Hardware Hero: “Ultimaker 2″ Printer Source Files Available Online #3DThursday #OpenHardware #opensource #3DPrinting


    Ultimaker2

    Keeping true to its commitment to open hardware and potential for sharing source to revolutionize desktop manufacturing, Ultimaker has finally been able to launch the “Ultimaker 2″ Printer Source Files:

    From day one, we have been recognized for our open source culture and we feel that open source brings the field of 3D printing to a higher level. It is our firm belief that sharing knowledge does not mean losing knowledge. On the contrary, we learn from each other, inspire each other and use each other’s knowledge to create even better products and develop impressive innovations world-wide.

    What sets Ultimaker and YouMagine apart is the sharing philosophy. Since the very first time Ultimaker saw the light of day, we have supported open source. We shared our source files and our community gave us valuable feedback. Our YouMagine platform is not only a place where we share our information, it is also a social place, a community, where users can create profiles and start collaborations with other makers. Many contributions by our community can be found in the Ultimaker design as it is today.

    The day has come that we are launching the drawings of the Ultimaker 2 and share them with the world. We are excited to see what kind of ideas, innovations, improvements and products this will lead to. We will continue to share our knowledge and experience and look forward to achieving many remarkable 3D printing goals together. Or in the words of Martijn Elserman, co-founder of Ultimaker: “Since its introduction, the Ultimaker 2 received a very positive response and its demand has been beyond expectation. This strengthens our confidence in our philosophy to innovate and improve together with the worldwide community of 3D printer enthousiasts.”

    Read More. Get the Ultimaker 2 source files here.

    Ultimaker2Extruder

    Ultimaker2FilamentFeed

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 15:00
    How to 3D Print a 20w Amplifier Box



    You can build an audio project that pumps 20 watts of power with the MAX9744 stereo amplifier. The MAX9744 is a tiny cool-runing class d amplifier requires no heat sink and blasts extremely awesome sound. 5-12volt DC power keeps the amplifier on and you can plug in any stereo line to the headphone jack. This lovely kit includes a power filter capacitor, terminal blocks and a 1k potentiometer to adjust volume. Our 3d printed enclosure houses the components and can be printed in any color to match your style.

    Check out our guide on The Adafruit Learning System for full instructions and circuit diagram.

    Don’t forget to check our thingiverse page for more awesome 3D printed projects.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 15:00
    Making Kaylee’s Fluffy Pink Dress


    kaylee pink dress firefly

    When you normally wear grubby overalls, a fancy dress is a nice change of attire and Kaylee Frye’s dress from “Shindig” is one of the most memorable costumes from Firefly. I couldn’t imagine re-creating all those ruffles, but cosplayer Fire Lily put the entire gown together for $160. She used dupioni silk and lots of white sheer voile fabric – yes, she dyed all the pink and peach layers:

    The second hard part was the skirt – although the costume was said to have used pre-made silk chiffon hoops, chiffon is entirely too flimsy a fabric to get the correct drape for the ruffles, in my opinion. I opted to use a white sheer voile fabric and dye the peach and pink layers. Each layer of ruffles is edged with rolled hems that I had to run through my sewing machine twice using a zig-zag stitch (omg took forever!). I then sewed each layer onto a plain cotton sheath skirt and attached it to the bodice.

    Read more at Fire Lily Cosplay’s blog.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 14:00
    Open Source 3D Printer Designer: Diego Porqueras of Deezmaker on Bukobot and Bukito #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Andrew Mazzotta of 3DHacker shares an in-depth interview with open source 3D printer designer Diego Porqueras of Deezmaker on Bukobot and Bukito:

    Diego Porqueras, the founder of Deezmaker, is known for developing and sourcing the highest quality components in the consumer 3D printing industry. If anyone has operated or “heard” Deezmaker’s printers they’re impressively quiet, solidly engineered to print 10+ materials, and configured for quick upgradability. Some printer features are gold plated nozzles, synchromesh instead of nobby belts, and drive gears designed by aerospace engineers.

    Additionally Diego has a philosophy of keeping “Open Source” a top priority. It’s a path he and his associates want in their daily lives as well. (Well known Whosawhatsis is also part of the development crew at Deezmaker and develops the “Bukito 3D Printer”.)…

    Read More.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:01
    Tearing Down a Cheap External USB Battery

    [cpldcpu] recently received an external USB battery as a promotional gift and thought it would be a good idea to tear it down to see its insides. At first glance, he could see that the device included a USB micro-b socket used as a 5V input (for charging), a USB-A socket for 5V output, a blue LED to indicate active power out and a red one to indicate charging.

    Opening the case revealed that most space was taken up by a 2600mAH ICR18650 Li-Ion battery, connected to a tiny PCB. A close inspection and a little googling allowed [cpldcpu] to identify the main components of the latter: a battery mangement IC, a 2A boost converter, a 3A Schottky diode, a few 2A N-Mosfets, a 300mA 2.5V LDO and an unknown 6-pin IC. It is very interesting to learn that every last one of these components seems to be sourced from China, which may explain why this USB battery is given for free. Do you think they designed it in-house and outsourced the manufacturing, or is this a product Digi-Key simply bought and put their name on?

    Editorial Note: Digi-Key is an advertiser on Hackaday but this post is not part of that sponsorship. Hackaday does not post sponsored content.

    Unrelated video of extremely similar hardware. [Thanks James from comments]

    Filed under: hardware

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:00
    Constructing the Battery Signal Generator

    panelwiringTips for building your own circuits.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 13:00
    Philips Shines Light on First 3D-Printed Smart Lamp #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Philips3DPrintedSmartLamp

    Philips Shines Light on First 3D-Printed Smart Lamp. From Mashable:

    Philips announced a collection of new products on Friday — from a new app-controlled light bulb to a kinectic-energy-powered light switch — but we’re most entranced by its 3D-printed lamp line.

    The lamp comes in two styles that work with the company’s Hue line, the Entity (pictured above) and the Tempest (pictured below, in pendant form). Users can create lighting effects using more than 16 million color variations on the lamp and control the settings via an accompanying app. Lighting can also be programmed based on the time of day and personal preferences.

    But the price of cool is hefty. The table lamps are $4,445 and the pendant edition is $4,135. The products are available for pre-order on Meethue.com, starting March 31.

    Philips is also launching the Hue tap ($59), a product the company calls the first ever kinetic-powered, web-enabled light switch. If you don’t want to use an app to control Hue bulbs, the light switch sticks to the walls and can be re-applied throughout the house. Users can also program up to four color sequences. It doesn’t need batteries (it requires a bridge that plugs into a home Wi-Fi router) and can control up to 50 Hue bulbs. It will go on sale in North America and Europe this summer….

    Read More.


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 12:00
    How to Bake Scientifically Accurate Cake Planets #3DThursday

    How to Bake Scientifically Accurate Cake Planets:

    Created by self-taught chef Rhiannon from Cakecrumbs, these spherical cakes are scientifically accurate representations of the subsurface on Jupiter and Earth, right from the outer atmosphere down through the crust, mantle, and inner core.

    …If you want to try it yourself, you can find a detailed step-by-step recipe on the CakeCrumbs website. I will definitely be sending this link to my friends when my birthday comes around again! …

    Read More.

    Planet cakes

    Earth cake

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 11:00
    monika horcicova 3D printed the wheel of life #3DxArt #3DThursday #3DScanning #3DPrinting

    Monika horcicova02

    monika horcicova 3D printed the wheel of life:

    made from 3D printed pieces, ‘the wheel of life’ by czechdesigner monika horcicova is a skeletal sculpture that is based on a symbol of infinity. the round structure refers to the repeated cycle of conception and death, with walking legs used to evoke the image of people in motion. the idea explores the fragility of human bones, which despite this are able to carry the weight of the whole human figure during its life. the plaster composite pieces were 3D printed and then placed in a form and casted in a polyurethane resin, the individual pieces were then assembled into a single object….

    Read more.

    Monika horcicova

    Monika horcicova03


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    The Tiny, Awesome Class D Amp

    ClassD

    In one of [Hans Peter]‘s many idle browsing sessions at a manufacturer’s website, he came across a very cool chip – a 10 Watt class D amplifier chip. After the sample order arrived, he quickly put this chip in a box and forgot about it. A year or so later, he was asked to construct a portable boom box kit for a festival. Time to break out that chip and make a small amplifier, it seems.

    The chip in question – a Maxim MAX9768 – is a tiny chip, a 24-pin TQFP with 1mm pitch. Hard to solder freehand, but this chip does have a few cool features. It’s a filterless design, very easy to implement, and perfect for the mono boombox project he was working on. A simple, seven component circuit was laid out on a breadboard and [Hans] got this chip up and running.

    For the festival, a breadboarded circuit wouldn’t do. He needed a better solution, something built on a PCB that would work well as a kit. The requirements included the MAX9768 chip, a guitar preamp, stereo to mono summing, and through-hole parts for easy soldering. The completed board ended up being extremely small - 33.6mm by 22.5mm – and works really great.

    After the festival, [Hans] found a 20 Watt chip and designed an all-SMD version of the board. Just the thing if you ever want to stuff a tiny amplifier into a crevice of a project.

    Filed under: hardware

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 10:00
    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced #3DxMusic #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedTrombone

    Reddit 3D Printed Musical Instrument Contest Winners Announced:

    It’s official! The winners of the Reddit r/3Dprinting March musical instrument contest have been announced.

    Congratulations to all the winners, and thanks to all the participants, the moderators, the team over at Bld3r.com (the open source object sharing site where submissions were posted), and of course the entire r/3Dprinting community.

    You can see the original contest here. And don’t forget to check out some of the previous contests.

    We were so impressed by all the submissions, however there could only be three winners.

    After weeks of voting, including input from the LulzBot team and of course the moderators and several judges, the winners are as follows:

    1st Place

    2nd Place

    3rd Place

    Read more.

    3DPrintedUkelele

    TheLEDMan

    Reddit


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    Lulzbot

    LulzBot TAZ – Open source 3D Printer: The evolution of desktop 3D printing continues with TAZ 3, LulzBot’s top-of-the-line, highest quality printer to date. Merging technical expertise with design sensibilities, TAZ is for inventors, entrepreneurs, design engineers and prototypers — bring your ideas to life with TAZ.” (read more)

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 09:00
    Candles with a 3D printer & scanner #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning

    70YearsCandles

    Christian Lölkes shares a helpful tutorial for creating candles with a 3D printer & scanner:

    The CEO at my student job turned 70. Having a 3D printer & scanner at work there was only one thing to do: make candles.

    Why not print the mold directly?

    1. I don’t have any ABS. I tried once and i didn’t like it. Wax melts at about 60°C and PLA gets soft at the same temperature.
    2. Even if you have ABS i recommend you to use a silicone mold. It will last longer and is soft and flexible. With this complex structure you need a flexible mold in order to remove the candle without damaging it.

    What do you need

    • A 3d model. If you have a Kinect (or similar) and a good computer with the right GPU you can scan yourself (with the help of your friends/brother or your mom). Maybe a nearby hackerspace can help you. I did it with ReconstructMe and a PC-Kinect.
    • A 3d printer. If you don’t have one you can order a print online or go to your local hackerspace/fablab to print one (don’t forget to bring some beer).
    • Silicone mold mass. You can get it for 40€/kg on the internet or at some hardware stores.
    • Old candles or wax (+ color) and candle wick. I got 10cm long wicks with a little metal base plate: perfect.
    • Time.

    Read More.

    3DPrintedCandleMold

    Candlemolds


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 08:00
    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman #3DxMedicine #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    3DPrintedSkull

    Medical First: 3-D Printed Skull Successfully Implanted in Woman, from NBC News:

    Doctors in the Netherlands report that they have for the first time successfully replaced most of a human’s skull with a 3-D printed plastic one — and likely saved a woman’s life in the process.

    The 23-hour surgery took place three months ago at University Medical Center Utrecht. The hospital announced details of the groundbreaking operation this week and said the patient, a 22-year-old woman, is doing just fine.

    The woman, whose name wasn’t released, suffered from severe headaches due to a thickening of her skull. She slowly lost her vision, her motor coordination was suffering and it was only a matter of time before other essential brain functions would have atrophied, Verweij said in a press release issued by UMC Utrecht.

    Verweij noted that in some brain operations it’s common for part of the skull to be temporarily removed to reduce pressure on the brain, then put back later or replaced by an artificial implant. In this case, doctors inserted nearly an entire plastic skull that was manufactured with the help of Anatomics, an Australian medical device company that specializes in 3-D printing.

    “We used to create an implant by hand in the operating theater using a kind of cement, but those implants did not have a very good fit,” Verweij said. “Now we can use 3-D printing to ensure that these components are an exact fit. This has major advantages, not only cosmetically but also because patients often have better brain function compared with the old method.”

    Three months after surgery, the woman’s pain is gone and she can see again….

    Read more.

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 07:00
    An Oculus Rift Hack That Lets You Draw in 3-D #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    An Oculus Rift Hack That Lets You Draw in 3-D:

    A group of Royal College of Art students–Guillaume Couche, Daniela Paredes Fuentes, Pierre Paslier, and Oluwaseyi Sosanya–has developed a tool called GravitySketch that starts tracing an outline of how these systems could work as creative tools.

    Their high-tech sketchpad looks a bit like a prop from Tron, with its etched grid of transparent plastic and sternly rectilinear user interface panel, but the goal is to make augmented reality feel as natural and organic as sketching in a notebook. Artists hold the acrylic drawing tablet like its analog counterpart and sketch with a custom stylus. Radio frequency sensors record the movements and coordinates on the pad and send them to an Arduino hidden in the black box on its edge. No lines are actually drawn on the pad, but the artist sees them float in air through a pair of augmented reality glasses wirelessly connected to the Arduino.

    The goal was to create tools that would privilege spatial awareness.
    The real trick of GravitySketch is that, rather than requiring artists to master tricks like perspective or foreshortening to suggest depth and physicality, they can simply rotate the tablet and draw lines that connect to their previous marks, creating a sense of form in the process. The drawings hang in space, can be approached from any angle, and can be rotated like physical objects.

    A solo sketch can quickly become a jam session if several people surround the drawing, allowing people to collaborate in real time with none of the loss that comes from sharing ideas asynchronously and in traditional formats.

    Customized software was developed by the team using the game engine Unity 3D. “We wanted, from the beginning, to have a very minimal user interface,” says Couche. “The four of us are users of the conventional CAD tools and having something simple that does not requires you to become an expert in order to create was on strong driver for us.” That’s not to say the tools are unsophisticated and sketches drawn in the virtual world can be transformed into 3-D printed objects with ease….

    Read more.

    Oculus

    Oculus03


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 07:00
    Arduino Controlled Dahlander Motor Switch

     

    Dahlander Switch

    [Jean-Noel] is fixing a broken Lurem woodworking machine. This machine uses a three-phase Dahlander motor, which has three operation modes: stop, half speed, and full speed. The motor uses a special mechanical switch to select the operating mode. Unfortunately, the mechanical bits inside the switch were broken, and the motor couldn’t be turned on.

    To solve the problem without sourcing a new switch, [Jean-Noel] built his own Arduino based Dahlander switch. This consists of three relays that select the wiring configuration for each speed mode. There’s also a button to toggle settings, and two lamps to show what mode the motor is currently in.

    The Arduino runs a finite-state machine (FSM), ensuring that the device transitions through the modes in the correct order. This is quite important, since the motor could be damaged if certain restrictions aren’t followed. The state machine graph was generated using Fizzim, a free tool that generates not only FSM graphs, but also Verilog and VHDL code for the machines.

    The final product is housed in a DIN rail case, which allows it to be securely mounted along with the rest of the wiring. The detailed write-up on this project explains all the details of the motor, and the challenges of building this replacement switch.

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, tool hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 04:00
    Happiness Is Just A Flaming Oxy-Fuel Torch Away

    The Egg-Bot is pretty awesome, we must say. But if you have one, you end up with lot of delicate, round things rolling around your abode and getting underfoot. Warmer weather is just around the corner, so segue from spring gaiety to hot fun in the summertime with the MarshMallowMatic kit from [Evil Mad Scientist].

    The MarshMallowMatic is a CNC oxy-fuel precision marshmallow toaster based on the Ostrich Egg-Bot design. Constructed from flame-retardant plywood, it is sure to add an element of delicious danger to children’s birthday parties and weekend wingdings alike. You don’t have to get too specific with those BYOM invitations because this bad boy will torch standard and jumbo marshmallows like a boss.

    The kit includes a 5000°F oxy-fuel torch and a 20 ft³ oxygen tank, but the tank comes empty and you’ll have to supply your own propane, acetylene,  or hydrogen. It comes with adapters to fit disposable propane and MAPP cylinders, which are also not included. However, you will receive a fine selection of sample marshmallows to get you started. Watch the MarshMallowMatic fire up some happiness after the break. You could toast a special message and load it into this face-tracking confectionery cannon to show how much you care.

    Filed under: cnc hacks, cooking hacks

  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER + POPULAR MECHANICS Wednesday night 8pm ET 4/2/2014 – Special guest Jerry Beilinson!
  • Jeudi, Avril 3, 2014 - 01:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout!

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