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Planet

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 19:55
    New Project: Brownie Pan LED Light Panel

    LEDPanel_final-13Roll your own photography light panel for a fraction of the cost of pro units.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 19:00
    STEM-tastic Saturday – STEM Alliance of Larchmont – Mamaroneck #makereducation

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    The STEM Alliance of Larchmont-Mamaroneck will hold STEM-Tastic Saturday, an interactive STEM event, on Saturday May, 4 2014.

    The STEM Alliance of Larchmont-Mamaroneck with generous support from the Mamaroneck Schools Foundationis launching a new, community-widecelebration of SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM)

    Saturday, May 3, 2014 – 1pm to 5pm – Hommocks Middle School

    STEM-tastic Saturday will be an event that makes all STEM disciplines accessible, interactive and fun. Our goal is to spark the youthful imagination that’s in all of us by bringing STEM alive through play, conversation and even mental fitness challenges.

    Look for on-going announcements about speakers, workshop presenters, featured STEM professionals, exhibitors, vendors and more. Consider how you can get involved in advance and contact us now.

    Screen Shot 2014 03 19 at 12 35 05 PM

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 18:35
    Imogen Heap’s Glove Project Launches a Kickstarter Campaign

    c94cbb2c94f95e309ae875a7f0cb84d4_largeImogen Heap and a team of makers have been developing a pair of high-tech gloves, called the Mi.Mu, that will allow users to manipulate sounds via gestures, allowing a literally hands-on style of writing and performing.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 18:01
    Retrotechtacular: The Magic of Making Cars in the ’30s

    retrotechtacular-manufacturing-chevrolet

    We usually shy away from calling things ’magic’ in our features because, you know… science. But in the case of this Chevrolet manufacturing reel from 1936 the presentation is nothing short of an industrialized version of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. Well, not in the sense of mischief, but in that there is almost no explanation and the way the footage is laced together you get the strong feeling that, at the time, this type of industrialization was magic; a modern marvel. The techniques and skills of each worked passed down from a master to an apprentice but virtually unknown to the general public.

    The clip, which is also embedded below, starts off in the machine shop where mold makers are getting ready to go into assembly line production. From there it’s off to the foundry for part casting and then into the stamping plant where white-hot (perhaps red-hot, but black and white film) metal is shaped by man-mangling presses. The image above follows the cast, stamped, and machined parts onto the assembly line. We like seeing a room full of pistons being QA checked by hand using a width gauge and micrometer.  The film continues through to the finished vehicle and we think you’ll agree there’s more than enough voyeuristic video here to overcome that lack of narration.

    [Thanks Pretenda]

    Retrotechtacular is a weekly column featuring hacks, technology, and kitsch from ages of yore. Help keep it fresh by sending in your ideas for future installments.

    Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Retrotechtacular, transportation hacks

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 18:00
    Incredibly detailed cut paper illustrations and sculptures from French duo Zim & Zou #ArtTuesday

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    Can you imagine how long this must take? These sculptures from French duo Zim & Zou are astonishingly detailed. Via Colossal.

    It’s been over two years since we last featured the work of French duo Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann of Zim&Zou (previously here and here). The pair of graphic designers create paper sculpture, installations, and illustrations for leading luxury brands, books, magazines as well as their own edification. Collected here are a number of works from the last few years and you can explore much more over on their website and on Behance.

    Read more.

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  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 17:17
    Learning Arduino with the Adafruit Arduino Starter Pack #ArduinoD14

    ArduinoStarterPack

    Luis from OpenSource.com spent some time tinkering with the Adafruit Arduino Starter Pack and shared his thoughts with us.

    Are you new to Arduino? Open hardware like the Arduino Starter Pack from Adafruit is a great way to start tinkering with this small computer board. It is the ideal kit for beginners to open hardware or anyone looking to start a project using the Arduino microcontroller.


    Adafruit 2797
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    Celebrate Arduino Day 2014 with Massimo Banzi, the co-founder and CEO of Arduino and Adafruit on a special Saturday night 7pm ET March 29th, 2014 LIVE show!

    Arduino Day is a worldwide celebration of Arduino’s first 10 years. It’s 24 hours full of events – both official and independent, anywhere around the world – where people interested in Arduino can meet, share their experiences, and learn more.

    See you there!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 17:06
    McGuckin and SparkFun Workshop This Weekend!

    This coming Saturday, SparkFun and local business McGuckin Hardware are teaming up to offer Boulder-area residents a crash-course in beginner soldering.

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    Join us on Saturday, March 29th from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. at McGuckin Hardware at 2525 Arapahoe Ave. in sunny Boulder, Colorado. We’ll be working on our SparkFun Weevil Eye Kit to teach you the in’s-and-out’s of through-hole soldering.

    All are welcome and the event is free! We hope to see you there!

    comments | comment feed

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 16:30
    “Street-Fighting Mathematics” is NOT your normal math textbook #makereducation

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    Street-Fighting Mathematics: The art of educated guessing and opportunistic problem solving by Sanjoy Mahajan grew out of the author’s course at MIT. Mahajan encourages a hands-on, messy, creative approach to using mathematics to address real world situations. The book focuses less on complex problems with neat solutions and more on developing the right tools to make educated guesses and assessments. The full text is available to the public here.

    In problem solving, as in street fighting, rules are for fools: do whatever works—don’t just stand there! Yet we often fear an unjustified leap even though it may land us on a correct result. Traditional mathematics teaching is largely about solving exactly stated problems exactly, yet life often hands us partly defined problems needing only moderately accurate solutions. This engaging book is an antidote to the rigor mortis brought on by too much mathematical rigor, teaching us how to guess answers without needing a proof or an exact calculation.

    In Street-Fighting Mathematics, Sanjoy Mahajan builds, sharpens, and demonstrates tools for educated guessing and down-and-dirty, opportunistic problem solving across diverse fields of knowledge—from mathematics to management. Mahajan describes six tools: dimensional analysis, easy cases, lumping, picture proofs, successive approximation, and reasoning by analogy. Illustrating each tool with numerous examples, he carefully separates the tool—the general principle—from the particular application so that the reader can most easily grasp the tool itself to use on problems of particular interest.

    Street-Fighting Mathematics is available in print and online under a Creative Commons Noncommercial Share Alike license.

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 16:00
    How to get interrupts through Linux GPIO with the #BeagleBoneBlack @TXInstruments @BeagleBoardOrg

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    Ben Martin shows us how to receive interrupts through Linux GPIO using the BeagleBone Black.

    A previous article looked at the differences between the Arduino and the BeagleBone Black in how you go about accessing chips over the SPI. This time around the focus will be on how to receive interrupts from your hardware on the BeagleBone Black.

    The header pins on each side of the BeagleBone Black can be used for General Purpose I/O (GPIO). This way you can set the voltage to high or low, or if you are reading you can see if the voltage is currently high or low on the pin. Generally, high might be 3.3 volts and low would be the common ground voltage. The GPIO support in Linux can optionally generate interrupts when the signal raises from ground to a high voltage, from the high voltage to ground, or if either of these cases occurs.

    Read more.


    BeagleBone Adafruit Industries Unique fun DIY electronics and kitsEach Tuesday is BeagleBone Black Day here Adafruit! What is the BeagleBone? The BeagleBones are a line of affordable single-board Linux computers (SBCs) created by Texas Instruments. New to the Bone? Grab one of our Adafruit BeagleBone Black Starter Packs and check out our extensive resources available on the Adafruit Learning System including a guide to setting up the Adafruit BeagleBone IO Python Library. We have a number of Bone accessories including add-on shields (called “capes”) and USB devices to help you do even more with your SBC. Need a nice display to go along with your Bone? Check out our fine selection of HDMI displays, we’ve tested all of them with the Beagle Bone Black!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 16:00
    The Human Body App is an Interactive and Educational App for Kids #makereducation

    This new educational app for kids from Tinybop helps kids explore the language and the visuals of human biology, via trendhunter.

    Tinybop is about to release a new set of educational apps, the first of which is called the Human Body app. Designed by Kelli Anderson, the app for children lets kids explore and learn about the human form. It will be released in 48 languages so kids all over the world can learn.

    The children’s app will have smart interactions and a beautiful design. Young users will not be exposed to any advertising or in-app purchases either in the Human Body app or any app from Tinybop.

    The educational series will be called the Explorer’s Library. These games are intended to “help children develop a foundational understanding of the world.” The objective of these apps is fun, interactivity and deep understanding and immersion.

    The Human Body will cover everything from animated brains to bones. Kids will be able to poke, probe and examine different systems. The app will also contain a recording tool so users can ask questions, interact and play with each other.

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    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 15:00
    Vending Machine is Now Cyborg Friendly

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    Don’t you hate having to pull out your wallet or cellphone in order to pay for something? What if you could just wave your hand and transfer money that way? Well [David] did, so he decided to do something about it. He made the vending machine in his hackerspace, FamiLAB, cyborg friendly.

    The problem was, the vending machine wasn’t technically his to play around with… so he had to do this hack without actually modifying the machine itself — which we admit, actually makes it quite a bit more interesting!

    But first, why is [David] even doing this? Is he a cyborg or something? Well, not quite, but he’s quite enthusiastic about bio-tech (is that what we call it now?) — anyway, he has NFC implants in his hand, and magnets in his fingertips to give him a sixth “electro-sense”. Wanting to take the most advantage of these augmented abilities, he put together this clever NFC credit card emulator.

    To read his hand, he’s using an Adafruit RFID/NFC Shield stuck on the front of the machine, with an Arduino Mega 2560 to control it. To get around messing with the credit card unit, he’s placed a solenoid next to it, which is close enough that when energized with his information… the credit card machine reads it. Whether or not you like the cyborg action itself, what [David's] put together is pretty incredible. He has detailed instructions and material on GitHub if you’re interested in knowing more.

    Alternatively you could just get an NFC ring… or for the electro-sense, a neodymium ring magnet.

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Microcontrollers

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 15:00
    The Making of Unnumbered Sparks #ArtTuesday

    Gaze your eyes upon Unnumbered Sparks, the interactive artwork of artist Janet Echelman and Google’s Aaron Koblin.

    What’s not obvious to the public is when you look at the sculpture, you’re actually looking at a web browser. The interactive lighting is actually one giant Chrome window, stretched across the 300-foot long sculpture with the help of five high-definition projectors. To interact, visitors open a website using Chrome or other modern mobile browser on their smartphone or tablet. After selecting a color, they use their fingers to trace paths along the surface of their device, which are then projected onto the sculpture in real-time as colorful beams of light. The result is a crowd-controlled visual experiment on a giant, floating canvas.

    Read more.

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 15:00
    National Geographic Education: Engineering Exploration Challenge #makereducation

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    Check out the National Geographic Education: Engineering Exploration Challenge for young engineers!

    Between now and May 1, 2014, develop a solution to a challenge below and you could be chosen to participate in a National Geographic Google+ Hangout. During the Hangout, your solution could be tested by National Geographic engineers in the top-secret Engineering Lab! The National Geographic Kids Engineering Exploration Challenge is open to all persons ages 6-18 worldwide.

    How to Participate

    1. Choose your challenge. Try one, two, or even all three!

    2. Think like an engineer.
    Check out the National Geographic Engineering Process. This is the same process that National Geographic explorers use to solve problems.

    3. Get busy!
    Now, follow the Engineering Process to design, build, and test your solution. Your solution probably won’t work the first time, and that’s OK—failure is part of the engineering process. Change it and try again!

    4. Tell us about your solution for a chance to have your solution tested by National Geographic Engineers during a live Google+ Hangout.
    Once you’re satisfied with your solution, failure or success, submit it to National Geographic using the instructions at the bottom of this page. We want to hear about solutions that work and ones that don’t!

    Screen Shot 2014 03 18 at 8 40 57 PMScreen Shot 2014 03 18 at 8 41 04 PM

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 14:00
    Doc Ock Costume Will Grab Your Attention

    doc ock

    Even if you’re not Spider-Man, one place you don’t want to find yourself is in Doc Ock’s grasp. Instructables user Eldjotnar spent about six weeks building his full-size Doc Ock costume and it only cost him about $50. The costume has reach! It’s about seven feet tall by six feet wide. It may not be ideal for a convention, but it would be great for any event with plenty of room to move – like a Halloween parade. He used everything from drainage pipes to plywood to craft the outfit; here’s how he started with the all important claws:

    1. Download the picture of the template [on Instructables] to cut out the claws. Don’t scale it down, when you print it out, each claw should be 4″ x 8″. Or design your own if you so desire. In any case, print it out for use.

    2. Trace 12 copies of the template onto the plywood, and cut them out with the jigsaw.

    3. If you used the jigsaw, more than likely, you have spit edges. Take a Dremel, or some sandpaper, and smooth down the edges to make the paint application easier.

    4. Apply a healthy dose of primer, and then paint all of the claws bright silver.

    5. Take the VEX bands, and use tin snips to cut them into 5 hole segments, cutting along the indents.

    6. Pre-drill 2 #3/16 holes into the side of the arms. Attach the VEX segments to the two holes with some wood screws.

    7. Cut a small slice in the ends of the exterior arms, just long enough for the VEX segment. Make sure that there’s one of the claws per third of the arm exterior.

    8. Slip one of the #8-32 bolts through the VEX segment and through the slit. Attach the nut on the inside of the exterior. Use a lot of locktite.

    9. Repeat until you have all 4 arms with claws attached.

    doc ock claw

    Read more at Instructables.

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 13:00
    Reviving The Firebug Rover #beagleboneblack @TXInstruments @beagleboardorg

    Riving The Firebug Rover. via Flesh and Machines

    This rover was our robot in the competition of Magyarok a Marson 2011 (Hungarian on Mars). The competition was similar to a capture the flag game, with four rovers on the field at the same time.
    We weren’t that experienced that time (and our budge was low) so the project failed. We were good in the first round but unfortunately at the second round some smoke has been made and the motorcontroller went to the robo-heaven. Also we smoked an 25A car fuse, yeah something was very bad in our design. We didn’t have the automatic control in time so we used the manual version. In this case we had to use 15 sec delay between two command to follow the rules. We started the blog roughly after two months to the competition. Here is a picture of the rover at that time.

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    After some talk we took action, and used Bence’s motor controller. It’s double channel so we can control 2 different motors completely but we plugged each side (a pair of motors) to each control so this way we can use four motors instead of just two.

    The motors are 24V. The motorcontroller is from ebay you can check one of it’s successors on the link below:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Current-Stepper-Dual-DC-Motor-Driver-Module...

    The BeagleBone was above all: wifi support, motor control, web interface.

    The hardware consists of a lipo battery (5400 mah, 14,8v, serves a lot better than the 11.1V version), voltage stabilizator, motor controller, BeagleBone, wifi stick, usb hub, webcam.

    Read more


    BeagleBone Adafruit Industries Unique fun DIY electronics and kitsEach Tuesday is BeagleBone Black Day here Adafruit! What is the BeagleBone? The BeagleBones are a line of affordable single-board Linux computers (SBCs) created by Texas Instruments. New to the Bone? Grab one of our Adafruit BeagleBone Black Starter Packs and check out our extensive resources available on the Adafruit Learning System including a guide to setting up the Adafruit BeagleBone IO Python Library. We have a number of Bone accessories including add-on shields (called “capes”) and USB devices to help you do even more with your SBC. Need a nice display to go along with your Bone? Check out our fine selection of HDMI displays, we’ve tested all of them with the Beagle Bone Black!

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 12:27
    Walking in a Maker Wonderland: Makerland Day 3

    Turtlebot, the winner of the Makerland hackathon, is a Spark-powered LOGO processing, drawing robot built by combining a SumoBot Jr. kit with LEGO.What happens when 300 makers square off in a hackathon?

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 12:00
    Bus Sculpture Made Powerful With Hydraulic Arms #ArtTuesday

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    Enjoy this photo of London bus turned robot sculpture with the addition of with hydraulic arms. Created by David Cerny

    The bus…does push-ups with the help of an engine powering a pair of robotic arms. The bus’ exertions are accompanied by a recording of sounds evoking tough physical effort.

    Read more

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 12:00
    Open Source Humanoid Robot Is Awesom-o

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    Coming from a lab in France is The Poppy Project, an open source humanoid robot that’s at least as cool as ASIMO.

    Poppy was designed as an affordable bipedal robot for use in education and art. It’s a small robot at just over 80 cm in height, but it can walk, move its arms, rotate its torso, and interact with bags-of-meat humans with two cameras and an LCD face.

    Although Poppy is open source, that doesn’t mean it’s exactly cheap; the current design includes twenty-one Robotis Dynamixels MX-28 robotic actuators, actually servos with magnetic encoders, temperature sensor, and an ARM microcontroller. These actuators sell for about $200, meaning Poppy contains $4000 in motors alone. The estimated cost of the entire robot is €7500-8000, or about $10,000 to $11,000 USD.

    Still, there’s an incredible software platform that comes along with Poppy, and being open source any enterprising engineer can take up the project and attempt to bring the costs down. We’d love to take one out for a walk. Just get rid of the hands. That’s too far down the uncanny valley for us. Video below.

     

    Filed under: robots hacks

  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 12:00
    Expanding the Arduino Ecosystem with MicroView

    The MicroView on the end of a finger.The MicroView is Arduino compatible—and a member of the Arduino at Heart program—but it doesn't share that classic form factor. It's a tiny chip-sized, breadboard compatible, Arduino with a built-in OLED display.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 25, 2014 - 10:16
    Muzzley and Intel Galileo LED strip demo

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    Muzzley provides libraries for the most popular languages and platforms and in this project allows you to control a led strip with a mobile device (iOS and Android) using an Intel Galileo Board:

    We integrated Muzzley into an Intel Galileo board so that we could control an RGB LED strip with our smartphone through the cloud. We’re also able to read from and write to the individual GPIO pins.

    Check the code on Github and enjoy the video:

     

     

     

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