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Planet

  • Vendredi, Mars 21, 2014 - 05:00
    The Best Raspberry Pi Accessories from Adafruit and others! #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi

    NewImage

    Thorin Klosowski over at Lifehacker has posted his favorite Raspberry Pi Accessories and Adafruit has a bunch of them. They are also calling for submissions of your favorite accessories as well! Visit the site here to post your favorite pi add-on.

    The Raspberry Pi is a fantastic device and the fact that it’s open source means that all kinds of great accessories exist for it. So, let’s build a list of the best accessories for your various DIY projects.

    We’ve talked about the Raspberry Pi a ton because it’s so easy for everyone to use. Since its initial launch, a ton of accessories have come out for it. Some of these add basic functionality like Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, but other add crazy features like a camera. Let’s figure out which ones are the best.

    NewImage

    Adafruit’s PiTFT Mini Kit was the first item on the list!

    The PiTFT Mini Kit: This little $35 accessory adds a tiny 2.8″ touchscreen to your Raspberry Pi. It sounds kind of goofy, but it’s actually a pretty great way to instantly see what your doing, and the possibilities for various projects are pretty endless for it. It’s obviously low-res, but still, $35 to add a touchscreen to DIY projects is a pretty low cost of entry.

    NewImage

    Adafruit Prototyping Pi Plate Kit: I’m not the greatest solderer in the world, so this breadboard style plate that attaches to the Pi makes it easier for me to test out weird projects that actually attach the Raspberry Pi to real-world tools. It’s cheap at just $16 too, so if you want to use it as a way to permanently attach outside elements to the Pi, that’s totally possible.

    See the other items on the list here and submit your own!


    998Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

  • Vendredi, Mars 21, 2014 - 05:00
    Adafruit New Products! (video)
  • Vendredi, Mars 21, 2014 - 03:01
    USB On The ATtiny10

    tiny10

    Atmel’s ATtiny10 is their smallest microcontroller in terms of physical size – it’s an SOT-23-6 package, or about the same size as surface mount transistors. The hardware inside this extremely bare-bones; three I/O lines, 1kB of Flash, 32 bytes of RAM, and a reduced AVR core with 16 registers instead of 32. With such a minimal feature set, you would think the only thing this micro would be good for is blinking a LED. You’d be right, but [cpldcpu] can blink a LED with the ‘tiny10 over USB.

    The V-USB interface usually requires about 1.5kB of Flash in its most minimal implementation, and uses 50 bytes of RAM. This just wouldn’t do for the ‘tiny10, and although [cpldcpu] is working on a smaller, interrupt-free V-USB, there were still some hurdles to overcome.

    The biggest issue with putting code on the ‘tiny10 is its reduced AVR core – on the ‘big’ 32-register core, direct memory access is two words. On the ’10, it’s only one word. AVR-GCC doesn’t know this, and no one at Atmel seems to care. [cpldcpu] worked around this problem using defines, and further reduced the code size by completely gutting V-USB and putting it in the main loop.

    It’s not much, but now [cpldcpu] can blink an LED with a ‘tiny10 over USB. If you’re wondering, 96.4% of the Flash and 93.8% of the SRAM was used for this project.

    Filed under: ATtiny Hacks, Microcontrollers

  • Vendredi, Mars 21, 2014 - 01:31
    Fluke Responds to Trademark Problems

    Yesterday, we wrote a fairly-lengthy post about an ongoing customs issue we were dealing with. Essentially, our $15 multimeter, which we source as a quality entry-level meter for DIY enthusiasts is in violation of a trademark held by Fluke Corporation.

    SparkFun Digital Multimeter

    The culprit.

    The problem boils down to the fact that our $15 multimeter is yellow with a dark gray face, and Fluke’s trademark speaks to that effect. We’re still pretty upset that such a broad trademark can be enforced with little recourse for a company of SparkFun’s size.

    But things are changing quickly. We are working with a law firm specializing in customs law to try to split up the shipment and redirect the multimeters to various groups that are friendly to SparkFun but in countries where we don’t violate Fluke’s marks.

    Additionally, Wes Pringle, President of Fluke, graciously reached out to me and explained they would be posting a response on their Facebook page. While we still have issues with the way United States' IP laws are designed and enforced, but Fluke’s response was gracious. Here is what they had to say:


    Over the last 24 hours, we’ve been watching the conversation around SparkFun. We’ve wanted to join the conversation sooner, but needed to make sure we had all the information in front of us so we could help find the best solution. Thank you for your patience.

    Like any organization that designs and manufactures electronics, we actively work to stop lookalike products from making it to the marketplace. We do this to protect our company and the jobs of our employees. We also do so because it is a matter of safety for our customers. Our tools are used in high-energy industrial environments, where precision and safety is an absolute necessity.

    I mention this because we firmly believe that we must be – and will continue to be – vigilant in protecting Fluke and our customers. One step in doing that was registering a trademark protecting the look and feel of our devices so our customers know that if it looks like a Fluke it’s a Fluke.

    It’s important to know that once we’ve filed for and received trademark protection, US Customs has the responsibility to determine what to stop at the border, or what to seize. In this case, we first learned of this issue from SparkFun’s blog.

    We understand how troubling this is for a small company serving the needs of DIY-ers and hobbyists. Here is what we are going to do.

    Earlier today we contacted SparkFun and offered to provide a shipment of genuine Fluke equipment, free of charge for them to sell on their site or donate. The value of the equipment exceeds the value of the Customs-held shipment. SparkFun can resell the Fluke gear, recouping the cost of their impounded shipment, or donate it into the Maker community.

    While we will continue to enforce our trademark, we are taking this one-time action because we believe in the work of SparkFun supporting the Maker and education communities. This is important to us. We have been supporters of the Maker community for years through the donation of over half a million dollars worth of tools and employee time to organizations like First Robotics.

    We look forward to continuing our support of the community, of our customers, and of all the innovators out there.

    Sincerely,
    Wes Pringle
    President, Fluke Corporation


    Thank you Fluke! We would like to take you up on this offer. SparkFun is committed to education and will donate your meters through our outreach events at various school districts and educational conferences. We will be sure your meters make it into the hands of good people.

    While our discontent with the current environment of IP law remains, we are encouraged by Fluke’s handling of the situation and will continue to try to guide trademark law in a more business friendly way.

    It’s amazing what the power of good customers can do. Thank you SparkFun fans for getting change to happen faster and with fewer court fees. We’ll keep sharing the lessons we learn. Get ready for a trademark free crowd-designed multimeter….

    comments | comment feed

  • Vendredi, Mars 21, 2014 - 00:00
    Magnetic Propeller Balancer Takes Away the Shakes

    prop-balancer

    [Danijel0frk's] friends may call him unbalanced, but his propellers are always spot on. His well-balanced props are thanks to this magnetic balancer he built from scrap PC parts and pilfered office supplies. Propeller balance has always been important for radio controlled models. Flying for hours with a poorly balanced prop can wreak havoc on an air frame and the radio equipment within.  With today’s drones and R/C vehicles carrying cameras, accelerometers, and gyros, propeller balance has become even more important. A vibrating propeller can ruin a picture at best. At worst it can throw gyroscope and accelerometer readings off and cause a crash.

    [Danijel0frk's] balancer is based upon several commercial designs. A steel shaft from a CD-ROM drive is cut and the ends ground to points. A propeller to be balanced is mounted to the shaft. Propellers don’t all have the same hole size so two pen tips are pressed into service as self centering mounts. [Danijel0frk's] picture shows one tip pointing toward the prop hub while the other points away. The balancer will work better if both tips point inward, ensuring the shaft sits directly in the center of the propeller hub’s hole. Hard drive magnets suspend the prop and shaft from a drive rail and wood frame.  We should note that this type of balancer will only perform a static balance. Dynamic balance would require the propeller to be spinning on a motor with force sensors on the shaft. To perform a static balance, material is added to or removed from the propeller until it balances in any orientation. Click past the break for a good tutorial video on balancing.

    [via Instructables]

    Filed under: drone hacks

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:59
    Getting Started with the nRF8001 Bluefruit LE Breakout

    Adafruit Products 1697 Lrg
    Getting Started with the nRF8001 Bluefruit LE Breakout @ The Adafruit Learning System.

    Our nRF8001 Breakout allows you to establish an easy to use wireless link between your Arduino and any compatible iOS or Android (4.3+) device. It works by simulating a UART device beneath the surface, sending ASCII data back and forth between the devices, letting you decide what data to send and what to do with it on either end of the connection.

    Unlike classic Bluetooth, BLE has no big contracts to sign and no major hoops that you have to jump through to create iOS peripherals that you can legally design and distribute in the App Store, which makes it a great choice compared to classic Bluetooth which had (and still has) a lot of restrictions around it on the iOS platform.

    And now that Android also officially supports Bluetooth Low Energy (as of Android 4.3), it’s also — finally! — a universal communication channel covering the main mobile operating systems people are using today.

    We can get you started super fast with this BLE module which can act like an ‘every day’ UART data link. Send and receive data up to 10 meters away, from your Arduino to an iOS device. We’ve even made it easy to get started with our very own BLE connect app that has a “serial console” for sending/receiving data and also an ‘arduino pin i/o control station” to let you set pins on your Arduino to inputs or outputs, high or low logic or even PWM output, as well as read button presses and analog inputs. You can start prototyping your accessory and then use our open source Objective C code to base your new app on!

    Learn more!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:51
    Tutorial: Introduction to Bluetooth Low Energy #bluetooth #BTLE

    Microcontrollers Logobluetoothsmart
    Tutorial: Introduction to Bluetooth Low Energy @ The Adafruit Learning System.

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE), sometimes referred to as “Bluetooth Smart”, is a light-weight subset of classic Bluetooth and was introduced as part of the Bluetooth 4.0 core specification. While there is some overlap with classic Bluetooth, BLE actually has a completely different lineage and was started by Nokia as an in-house project called ‘Wibree’ before being adopted by the Bluetooth SIG.

    There are plenty of wireless protocols out there for engineers and product designers, but what makes BLE so interesting is that it’s almost certainly the easiest way to design something that can talk to any modern mobile platform out there (iOS, Android, Windows phones, etc.), and particularly in the case of Apple devices it’s the only HW design option that doesn’t require you to jump through endless hoops to be able to legally market your product for iOS devices.

    This guide will give you a quick overview of BLE, specifically how data is organized in Bluetooth Low Energy, and how devices advertise their presence so that you can connect to them and start passing data back and forth.

    Learn more!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:43
    NEW PRODUCT – Bluefruit LE – Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE 4.0) – nRF8001 Breakout [v1.0]

    1697 LRG

    NEW PRODUCT – Bluefruit LE – Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE 4.0) – nRF8001 Breakout [v1.0] :Our Adafruit Bluefruit LE (Bluetooth Low Energy) nRF8001 Breakout allows you to establish an easy to use wireless link between your Arduino and any compatible iOS or Android (4.3+) device. It works by simulating a UART device beneath the surface, sending ASCII data back and forth between the devices, letting you decide what data to send and what to do with it on either end of the connection.

    Unlike classic Bluetooth, BLE has no big contracts to sign and no major hoops that you have to jump through to create iOS peripherals that you can legally design and distribute in the App Store, which makes it a great choice compared to classic Bluetooth which had (and still has) a lot of restrictions around it on the iOS platform.

    And now that Android also officially supports Bluetooth Low Energy (as of Android 4.3), it’s also — finally! — a universal communication channel covering the main mobile operating systems people are using today.

    We can get you started super fast with this BLE module which can act like an ‘every day’ UART data link (with an RX and TX characteristic). Send and receive data up to 10 meters away, from your Arduino to an iOS device. We’ve even made it easy to get started with our very own BLE connect app that has a “serial console” for sending/receiving data and also an ‘arduino pin i/o control station” to let you set pins on your Arduino to inputs or outputs, high or low logic or even PWM output, as well as read button presses and analog inputs. You can start prototyping your accessory and then use our open source Objective C code to base your new app on!

    The nRF8001 is nice in that it is just a BLE ‘peripheral’ (client) front-end, so you can use any micrcontroller with SPI to drive it. We have example C++ code for Arduino, which you can port to any other microcontroller, but some microcontroller is required – it is not a stand-alone module!

    1697top LRG

    Please note: There is not an Android version of the Adafruit Bluefruit LE App available (our native BLE application) at this time,however you can use Nordic’s Android nRF UART application with the nRF8001 Breakout on BLE capable Android devices (Nexus 4, Nexus 5, Nexus 7, etc.) for sending/receiving data. This is a product for ADVANCED USERS – At this time we recommend this product for people who are either OK with using the apps available (Nordic’s UART demo or our Bluefruit LE Connect) or are comfortable with writing iOS apps (and can refer to our App repository). We do not have a tutorial for writing your own iOS or Android BLE app at this time, don’t worry we’re working on one :)

    We have a guide to help you setup your nRF8001 Bluetooth Low Energy breakout, and start using some of the sample sketches we provide with it to connect to an iOS or Android device. If you’re new to Bluetooth Low Energy, be sure to check out our Introduction to Bluetooth Low Energy learning guide as well!

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:43
    NEW PRODUCT – Bluefruit LE – Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE 4.0) – nRF8001 Breakout [v1.0]

    1697 LRG

    NEW PRODUCT – Bluefruit LE – Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE 4.0) – nRF8001 Breakout [v1.0] :Our Adafruit Bluefruit LE (Bluetooth Low Energy) nRF8001 Breakout allows you to establish an easy to use wireless link between your Arduino and any compatible iOS or Android (4.3+) device. It works by simulating a UART device beneath the surface, sending ASCII data back and forth between the devices, letting you decide what data to send and what to do with it on either end of the connection.

    Unlike classic Bluetooth, BLE has no big contracts to sign and no major hoops that you have to jump through to create iOS peripherals that you can legally design and distribute in the App Store, which makes it a great choice compared to classic Bluetooth which had (and still has) a lot of restrictions around it on the iOS platform.

    And now that Android also officially supports Bluetooth Low Energy (as of Android 4.3), it’s also — finally! — a universal communication channel covering the main mobile operating systems people are using today.

    We can get you started super fast with this BLE module which can act like an ‘every day’ UART data link (with an RX and TX characteristic). Send and receive data up to 10 meters away, from your Arduino to an iOS device. We’ve even made it easy to get started with our very own BLE connect app that has a “serial console” for sending/receiving data and also an ‘arduino pin i/o control station” to let you set pins on your Arduino to inputs or outputs, high or low logic or even PWM output, as well as read button presses and analog inputs. You can start prototyping your accessory and then use our open source Objective C code to base your new app on!

    The nRF8001 is nice in that it is just a BLE ‘peripheral’ (client) front-end, so you can use any micrcontroller with SPI to drive it. We have example C++ code for Arduino, which you can port to any other microcontroller, but some microcontroller is required – it is not a stand-alone module!

    1697top LRG

    Please note: There is not an Android version of the Adafruit Bluefruit LE App available (our native BLE application) at this time,however you can use Nordic’s Android nRF UART application with the nRF8001 Breakout on BLE capable Android devices (Nexus 4, Nexus 5, Nexus 7, etc.) for sending/receiving data. This is a product for ADVANCED USERS – At this time we recommend this product for people who are either OK with using the apps available (Nordic’s UART demo or our Bluefruit LE Connect) or are comfortable with writing iOS apps (and can refer to our App repository). We do not have a tutorial for writing your own iOS or Android BLE app at this time, don’t worry we’re working on one :)

    We have a guide to help you setup your nRF8001 Bluetooth Low Energy breakout, and start using some of the sample sketches we provide with it to connect to an iOS or Android device. If you’re new to Bluetooth Low Energy, be sure to check out our Introduction to Bluetooth Low Energy learning guide as well!

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:29
    Fluke Issues Statement Regarding Sparkfun’s Impounded Multimeters

    fluke-reponds-to-sparkfun-dmm-impounding

    Fluke just issued a response to the impounding of multimeters headed for market in the United States. Yesterday SparkFun posted their story about US Customs officials seizing a shipment of 2000 multimeters because of trademark issues. The gist of the response is that this situation sucks and they want to do what they can to lessen the pain for those involved. Fluke is providing SparkFun with a shipment of genuine Fluke DMMs which they can sell to recoup their losses, or to donate. Of course SparkFun is planning to donate the meters to the maker community.

    Anyone with a clue will have already noticed the problem with this solution. The impounded shipment of 2k meters will still be destroyed… eh. The waste is visceral. But good for Fluke for trying to do something positive.

    Before we sign off let’s touch on the trademark issue for just a moment. We can’t really blame Fluke too much for this. The legal crux of the matter is you either defend your trademark in every case, or you don’t defend it at all. In this case it was the border agents defending the filing, but for ease of understanding we’ll not go into that. On the other hand, speaking in general business terms, the way things are set up it is advantageous to acquire a trademark specification that is as broad as possible because it helps to discourage competitors from coming to market. So trademark is good when it keep hucksters from trying to rip off consumers. But it is bad if applied too broadly as a way of defending a company’s market share.

    Where does Fluke come down in all of this? Who knows. There is literally no right answer and that’s why the discussion around yesterday’s post was full of emphatic arguments. A Fluke meter is a cream-of-the-crop device and they have the right (and obligation) to ensure that reputation is not sullied. SparkFun serves a market that probably can’t afford a Fluke at this time but may some day in the future. And this is the reason we can feel okay about this outcome.

    [via Twitter]

    Filed under: news, rants

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:15
    Kinematics Bodice: First Piece of Kinematics Clothing from Nervous System! #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning

    Jessica nervous system

    Kinematics Bodice: First Piece of Kinematics Clothing from Nervous System:

    The first piece of Kinematics clothing, a 3D-printed nylon bodice, will be debuted in New York City this week at the opening of the exhibition “Coding the Body” at apexart. The bodice is composed of 1,320 unique hinged pieces and was 3D-printed as a single part. In order to fit the bodice into the printer and minimize the space it took up in the machine, the design was printed in a flattened form that was designed with Nervous System’s “Kinematics” folding software. The bodice was wearable straight out of the printer; no pieces were manually assembled and no fasteners were added. The back features integrated 3D-printed snaps for fastening the garment.

    The bodice was produced from a 3D scan of Jessica Rosenkrantz, one of the designers. It serves as a proof of concept for Nervous System’s “Kinematics” design system which pairs a constructional logic of hinged panels with a simulation strategy of folding and compression to produce customized clothing designs that can be fabricated efficiently by 3D-printing. The system is an example of the developing field of 4D-printing where 3D-printing is used to create objects that transform in shape. Background information on our “Kinematics” project can be found here….

    More details of the “long road to printing a kinematics dress” here!

    Pasted Image 3 20 14 4 50 PM


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! We also offer the MakerBot Digitizer in our store. If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 22:00
    Game of Thrones Kingsguard Armor

    got kings guard armor

    Being the King of Westeros comes with perks and one of them is having your own Kingsguard. The elite group of knights will keep you safe from assassins, family members, you name it. RPF user teranmx created this armor set based on the Kingsguard armor seen in Game of Thrones. It looks beautiful and fit for knights serving the throne. The maker explained the build process at the RPF:

    I carved all of the patterns with my dremel. I used pvc glue to fuse it together. I used Bondo to fill gaps. I did add a few rivets for attaching tough areas and for comparison to other rivet marks. I do know from some more recent photos there are more details on the chest that I missed. I would like to fix that on the next one I make. On the shoulder pauldrons I took a bowl and vacuum formed the pvc over it, cut it mid way and then attached the two pieces together with the other part of the bowl pointing outward. I fused it with pvc glue, extra support with rivets, to fill big gaps i used window screen as a fiber for the bondo to hold onto extra along with the pvc. It allowed me to get those corners sharp since there was like a 1 inch gap in between the top and bottom. If I could’ve afforded it I would gone the next step further and made molds of all of this and cast them in another material so they would be solid.

    got kings guard armor 2

    Read more at The RPF.

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 21:42
    Motion Control for the Masses: The TinyG Story

    TinyGTinyG offers industrial-grade motion control that's accessible to casual users while still powerful enough for pros.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 21:00
    Full-sized, 3D-Printed Kayak! #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning

    If the honor of being the first 3D printed full-size boat would probably have to go to the Washington Open Object Fabricators (WOOF) team’s 3D printed milk jug race project back in Seattle in 2012, this is one of the more successful larger-than-a-human scale objects I’ve seen yet!
    Full-sized, 3D-Printed Kayak! Created by Grass Roots Engineering:

    I have completed construction of a completely 3D printed, customized Kayak. The Kayak measures 16ft 8in [5.08m] long and cost around $500 to make. It is made of ABS plastic, machine screws, brass threaded inserts and a little bit of silicone caulk. That’s it. And it floats. And I can Kayak around in it. In order to print such large, solid sections of Kayak, I had to modify my home-built, large scale 3D printer to print the parts inside a heated chamber so they would not warp or crack.

    The Kayak

    The Kayak is comprised of 28, 3D printed sections. Each section has brass threaded thermoplastic inserts so the next corresponding section can be screwed into it. Silicone caulk is only used between the sections to ensure it is watertight. This design was initially based on the Siskiwit Bay kayak by Bryan Hansel, but heavily modified for 3D printing. The shape of the kayak was tweaked to optimize performance based on my height and weight. To reduce print time and material usage, the kayak is printed at a 0.65mm layer height. It features a 6mm thick hull with a built-in, internal rib/support structure to give it strength, yet be lightweight and use less ABS plastic. On the bow and stern of the Kayak I added attach points for cameras, handles and future add-ons….

    Read more.

    Grass Roots Engineering

    Grass Roots Engineering


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! We also offer the MakerBot Digitizer in our store. If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 21:00
    Fail of the Week: The Demise of Lil’ Screwy

    fotw-demise-of-lil-screwy

    The subject of this Fail of the Week installment is entertaining if nothing else. [Chris] decided to see what kind of forces his home-built 100 ton press could stand up to. Turns out the press failed at punching a 1.5″ hole through 1/2″ plate steel.

    If you didn’t see it back in February make sure you take a gander at the premier of Lil’ Screwy. The diminutive press packed quite a bit of punch, using four hand-cranked screws to knock out holes in metal. [Chris] decided to tie-one-on and take his lathe for a spin to machine the larger 1.5″ punch set.

    He probably should have known when he switched from a 4-foot ratchet to a crescent wrench with a 12-foot pipe for leverage that this was going to be more than the press could handle. The bottom plate seen in the image above is beginning to cup, which in turn jams up the screws in the off-kilter threads.

    We fell a bit guilty in admitting we love to see equipment pushed to the point of failure like this. But perhaps that’s part of what this column is all about. Our favorite is still the PCB shear failure, but this comes in at a close second. Check out the video presentation after the break; just be warned that there’s a bit of rough language as part of the narrative.


    2013-09-05-Hackaday-Fail-tips-tileFail of the Week is a Hackaday column which runs every Wednesday. Help keep the fun rolling by writing about your past failures and sending us a link to the story – or sending in links to fail write ups you find in your Internet travels.

    Filed under: Fail of the Week, Hackaday Columns

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 20:45
    MakerBot Academy | An Athlete’s Gift to Golden State Students

    GoldenStateWarrior_BlogPost2

    They may be closing in on No. 1 in their conference, but the Golden State Warriors are about more than just winning games. In fact, when NBA forward Harrison Barnes isn’t helping the Golden State Warriors blaze a five-game winning streak, he’s an avid MakerBot Academy supporter.

    “For young kids, it’s a great alternative as opposed to playing video games or something less productive,” says the man with a 38-inch standing vertical jump. “It’s a way you can learn and have fun at the same time.”

    GoldenStateWarrior_BlogPost2_secondimage_quote

    To get students from the San Francisco Bay Area excited about 3D printing, Barnes stopped by Oakland High School last Monday with MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis and America Makes executive director Ralph Resnick to donate a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer.  The MakerBot Replicator 2 will be part of the science and engineering classes at the school.

    We can’t wait to see what the students of Oakland High will make!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 20:15
    New Project: Toothy Toothbrush Timer

    tooth-timer-use_1Using a 555 timer chip, a modified servomotor, and chattering novelty teeth, get your dentist-recommended brush time every time, with the Toothy Toothbrush Timer.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 19:25
    Embedded Software Engineer Needed / Adafruit Jobs Board

    BioLite-CampStove-SM120311-05-V2

    Embedded Software Engineer Needed / Adafruit Jobs Board

    SUMMARY:
    BioLite is seeking a software engineer to join us in developing our next generation of cutting-edge clean energy solutions. In this role you’ll develop firmware for a range of exciting new products, and work on challenging data analysis, research and productivity questions.

    TITLE: Software Engineer
    HOURS: Full-time
    LOCATION: Brooklyn, New York
    REPORTS TO: Director of Engineering
    COMPENSATION: Salary is competitive with other early-stage companies, including benefits, bonus plan, and equity stock options.

    OVERVIEW:
    BioLite is a for-profit social enterprise that develops, manufactures and markets distributed energy solutions for off-grid communities around the world. Our business serves two distinct markets, 1) developing-world families living in energy poverty, and 2) outdoor enthusiasts seeking fuel-independent cooking and electricity.
    This is a unique opportunity to join a fast-moving startup with both a technical and creative environment in the heart of Brooklyn. If you are looking to work with a growing product development team with a passion for the outdoors and a powerful social mission, we’re your company. You’ll have the opportunity to work on a range of products and research programs funded by both our product stream and research grants.

    KEY ACTIVITIES:
    • Firmware development for new energy-related products; will include firmware architecture design, code development, documentation, rigorous testing and debugging, and manufacture support.
    • Data analysis, scripting and research support for internal technology development, funded research, and product development; will include test automation, data gathering and analysis, presentation of results, and support of other team members in this process.
    • Development of internal systems and processes for productivity, information security, etc; will include general software engineering support, management of software processes, and development of software solutions to facilitate collaboration and productivity within the company.

    KEY ATTRIBUTES:
    The ideal candidate for this position
    • has a excellent academic and technical background in software engineering or computer science,
    • has 2-5 years of development experience in a range of languages and domains, including low-level embedded systems, scripting and data analysis,
    • is comfortable in a fast-paced, agile work environment and excited to tackle new challenges,
    • can work independently and take initiative while remaining a productive part of an interdisciplinary and collaborative product-development team.

    EXPERIENCE AND SKILLS REQUIRED:
    • experience with C for embedded microcontrollers/DSPs
    • experience with general-purpose scripting, preferably Python
    • experience with data analysis in MATLAB, R, or similar
    • experience with modern web frameworks desirable
    • some hardware experience preferred, e.g. basic circuit design, control systems, etc.
    • enthusiasm for new technology, a passion for collaboration and a sense of humor!

    Learn More

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 19:00
    The 3D Printer Experience @ Chicago, Illinois – #3DxRetail #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    [3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I'll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores -- sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. Only time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public. There appears to be enough interest and pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone's game!]

    The 3D Printer Experience @ Chicago, Illinois:

    Experience 3D printing first-hand! You may have read about it in the media or heard about it in the President’s State of the Union address. Now you can see what all the buzz is about!

    With over twenty 3D printers in-house and exciting new applications for you to explore. We are here to introduce you to a very bright future of personal, desktop manufacturing. We are dedicated to helping you navigate the path to greater creativity and freedom.

    This technology will dramatically alter our lives in the coming years so come visit and take part in a more imaginative and promising world….

    Read More.

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  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 18:00
    MRRF: Roundtable And Roundup

    Last weekend Hackaday made a trip out to the Midwest RepRap Festival in Goshen, Indiana. We met a ton of interesting people, saw a lot of cool stuff, and managed to avoid the Amish horse and buggies plying the roads around Goshen.

    We’ve already posted a few things from MRRF, including [Jordan Miller] and co.’s adventures in bioprinting, a very cool printable object repo that’s backed by a nonprofit LLC, some stuff from Lulzbot that included a new extruder, stretchy filament, and news of a 3D scanner that’s in development, ARM-based CNC controllers including the Smoothieboard and capes for the Beaglebone, 3D printed resin molds, the newest project from [Nicholas Seward], creator or the RepRap Wally, Simpson, and Lisa, and 3D printed waffles. It really was an amazing event and also the largest DIY 3D printer convention on the planet. How this happened in Goshen, Indiana is anyone’s guess, but we’d like to give a shout out to SeeMeCNC for organizing this event.

    With so many famous RepRappers in one place, it only made sense to put together a round table discussion on the state of RepRap, 3D printers, and microfabrication. We have a 40-minute long video of that, which you can check out after the break.

    The video above is a Q&A session with [Johnny Russell] of Ultimachine, developer for the RAMPS and RAMBo electronics boards, [Prusa] of Prusa Mendel and i3 fame, [Mike] a.k.a [Maxbots] of Maker’s Tool Works and developer of the MendelMax 2, and [Aeva], robot psychologist at Lulzbot (seriously, that’s what her card says). It’s not a lie to say these guys have had a hand in the stuff that has gone into 90% of all the RepRaps out there.

    We highly suggest getting a cup of coffee and opening that video up in a new tab. There are some great comments between the four of them, and some very insightful questions from the audience. Here’s a list of the questions asked:

    • What are the economics of open source and cheap clones?
    • Where is the RepRap community going this year?
    • How should companies incentivize less glamorous projects?
    • When do we get functional mechanical parts in 3D printing?
    • What are some recommendations for subtractive manufacturing toolchains?
    • Where is RepRap popular around the world?
    • What will happen with SLS patents expiring?
    • How did you get started and how can someone new contribute?
    • Can RepRap indefinitely fend off DRM?
    • What are some recommendations for open source 3D modelling programs?

    Also at the MRRF was mUVe 3D, makers of a very cool resin printer, and the only people in the RepRap community that have seen the light of coroplast for making non-structural panels on their machines. We also grabbed a video of them:


    Once again, we’d like to thank everyone who came out, SeeMeCNC for putting this event together, Makers Tool Works for 3D printed waffle irons, and everybody else who headed out to Goshen for the largest convention dedicated to RepRaps in the world.

    If you didn’t make it out, here’s some aerial footage courtesy of [Phil Briski] and his tiny quadcopter. Be sure to check out the 5 foot by 8 foot Jolly Wrencher flag, something we’re now considering putting in a Hackaday store. Hope to see you there next year!

    flag
    Simpson3
    simpson
    A vertical H-bot
    air1
    video
    This man was on the cover of Forbes magazine
    tant
    taz
    screw
    simpson2
    air2
    Custom waffles.
    mill
    scan
    Rules for the venue. No beer kegs *on the carpet*.
    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Hackaday Columns

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