h:D

Planet

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 13:00
    Where Are They Now? CNC Mill Edition

    pocketncThe landscape among new desktop CNC mills is vibrant and the tools are continually improving. Here are five of the most popular, with details on how they have updated their hardware, software, business plans, or personnel.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 13:00
    Bone Conductor Amp

    Turn almost anything into a speaker with a bone conductor transducer and a TPA2016 Stereo 2.8w Class D audio amplifier.

    A 3D printed enclosure will house the components and turn our breadboard prototype into a mini portalable sound system. The files are on thingiverse. All of the components and wiring tightly fit in the casing of the enclosure making this an elegant tight little package.

    Check out our guide on the adadfruit learning system for complete circuit diagram and full step-by-step instructions.


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 13:00
    PROTOSHOP @ Paris, France – #3DxRetail #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    ProtoshopParis

    [3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I'll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores -- sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. Only time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public. There appears to be enough interest and pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone's game!]

    Paris is for (3D) Printing! First France-based fab shop appears in Paris, and apparently offers snacks for those visiting to shop for 3D printers. Via 3Ders.org.

    Opened by MULTISTATION, a france-based industrial equipment distributor, this 3D print shop PROTOSHOP is located near Montparnasse station in downtown Paris.

    The shop officially opened in October 2012. Different kinds of 3D printers are presented, and your design can be printed on site on different machines with material of your choices.

    “We focus mainly on selling machines.” says Clément BOUTET, manager of the store.

    Customers will have a large choice of machines, including fully assembled EXTRU 3D printer and printer kit, the 3,000 euros TOUCH PRINT and professional high precision Solidscape 3D printers. Solidscape uses Drop-on-Demand (“DoD”) thermoplastic ink-jetting technology and can be used for printing complex wax objects, ideal for lost wax investment casting and mold making applications.

    Also displayed in the shop are 3D scanning devices with different levels of precision. A silicone vacuum casting machine is presented as a demo. Different specific CAD software are available including 3D-Doctor software, An imaging, rendering and visualization software for MRI, CT and microscopy.

    …The PROTOSHOP of MULTISTATION is the first 3D print physical store in France where people can walk inside and talk/work with staff. Protoshop is opened from Monday to Friday 10:00-18:30 at 14 Rue d’ Armorique Paris 15.

    Read more.

    TreatsAtProtoshop

    ProtoshopDisplayCase

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 12:01
    You are Fined 1 Credit for a Violation of the Verbal Morality Statute

    demolition-man-verbal-morality-monitor

    Some citizens can control their language and others cannot. What is a civilized society to do? In a dystopian future you can count on electronic monitoring. But wait, the future is now… or it will be in a few weeks. [Tdicola] is building the verbal morality monitor from Demolition Man as his entry in Hackaday’s ongoing Sci-Fi Contest.

    Currently the project is in the early planning phase, but holy cow this is a fantastic idea! For those that didn’t see the glorious 1993 feature film, the young [Stallone] pictured above is accepting a ticket (as in: he must pay for his violation) from the tattle-tale wall-mounted computer. Everything about this device is completely feasible using today’s tech. It needs voice recognition and a list of naughty words, a way to play a pre-recorded message, and a printer to spit out the tickets. The build log for the project outlines all of this, as well as possible cost and sources for each.

    We’ve been wondering who it was that injected an Artificial Intelligence into our project hosting system. We see both [tdicola] and [colabot] are on the team for this build. The names are too conveniently similar to be a coincidence, don’t you think?

    Filed under: contests

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 12:01
    “Printing dinner for two” and “Printing ideas into 3-D reality” (VIDEO) @ PBS NewsHour – #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    “Printing dinner for two” and “Printing ideas into 3-D reality” (VIDEO) @ PBS NewsHour:

    A.J. Jacobs and his wife Julie tried to live off of 3-D printed objects, including food. Their printed dinner-for-two was “weird,” A.J. Jacobs said….

    Read More.


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 11:00
    The 3D Printing Store @ Denver, Colorado – #3DxRetail #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    [3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I'll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores -- sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. Only time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public. There appears to be enough interest and pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone's game!]

    Here’s a few details from the launch of the store — they have now celebrated a one year anniversary! The 3D Printing Store @ Denver, Colorado:

    ….Principal Deb Wilcox said, “It was so gratifying to see kids that seemed to know about and people much older wanting to learn more…..  whether they were hobbyists, inventors or architects, and we had all of these and more.”  In fact, she continued “It was so crowded that some people couldn’t even get up to see any of the 6 printers we had in operation and are making an appointment to come back.  We’ll have to do this again.”

    As a reminder our store is the first store that allows you to come in and print you own design, email to set an appointment.  We feature 2 MakerBot Replicator 2 machines and a Stratasys U-Print.

    Thanks to our the good folks at Lulzbot from Loveland (www.lulzbot.com) who brought 3 of their machines including their new prototype, along with engineers to talk about their products…

    Read More.

    Opening3DPrintingStore

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 10:00
    Joshua Harker: 21st Century Self-Portrait #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Joshua Harker

    Joshua Harker: 21st Century Self-Portrait:

    21st Century Self-Portrait

    Based on a 3D scan of his face & CT scan of his skull, coupled with his filigree aesthetic the piece allows both forms to be viewed simultaneously juxtaposing the newfound reaches of our vision, discovery & technology against our vulnerability, privacy & humanity. The disembodied head suggests our increasing digital disconnect from the physical world & reexamination of reality.  Exhibit debut at 3D Print Show New York, February 12th-15th.

    The Digital 3D Portrait Project:  

    Announcing Joshua’s custom portrait sculpture project, launching on the Uformit mass customization marketplace. An exploration into the latest technologies applied to one of the oldest themes in art… the portrait. Using his ”21st Century Self-Portrait” the Uformia software allows Joshua to swap face scans while accurately transferring the design. Ultimately the software, in concert with forensic facial reconstruction science, will also accurately morph the skull to match the new face… a 21st century portrait in every way. The custom portrait masks are now available here.

    Read More.

    21st Century Self Portrait Joshua Harker

    Joshua Harker Mask


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 09:01
    KamerMaker Begins Printing a House

    kamermaker-wordpress182-1024x723-634930_610x431

    The KamerMaker is the world’s largest portable 3D printing pavilion built out of a shipping container — it has started printing an entire house out of plastic.

    We first shared the KamerMaker (literally “Room Maker” in Dutch) a few years ago when it was first designed and built as a collaboration project between Utilimaker and Architectburo DUS. Their intention was the ability to print 1:1 architectural designs, and now it has begun its biggest project yet — an entire house along the canal in Amsterdam.

    So far the KamerMaker has printed one corner of the Canal House, which features part of a staircase. It weighs about 400lbs and took a week to print. To increase the strength of these 3D printed parts, the company uses a honeycomb infill and before assembly will fill the gaps inside the piece with a type of foam that becomes as hard as concrete.

    The project is estimated to take three years for completion, and until then you can visit it at Tolhuisweg 7, 1031 CL in North Amsterdam, where it is open to the public for a small fee of €2.50 — this is a tourist city after all! When completed it will be a design museum, although the team at DUS hope it will be only the first of many 3D printed buildings.

    To learn more about the project, stick around for the following video.

    [via CNET]

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 09:00
    iMakr Store @ London, UK – #3DxRetail #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    IMakrStore

    [3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I'll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores -- sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. Only time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public. There appears to be enough interest and pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone's game!]

    John Abella shared about his visit to the iMakr Store in London:

    While in London for a business trip, I walked and took the train for a bit to get to the iMakr store – the “World’s Largest 3D Printer Store.”

    The store had opened a few weeks earlier, and even on a rainy afternoon there was foot traffic inside, browsing the wares.

    The retail (upstairs) space is about half printers on display, and half printed designs available for sale. These ranged from the expected (chess sets) to the unexpected – and clearly not printed on hobbyist printers – jewelry….

    …Most of the printers were not running at the time, but it could have been because it was late in the day. The staff was eager to help and I spoke to a customer who was buying an Afinia that night. The lower section of the store is for training classes.

    It’s exciting to see this kind of store popping up, and I hope it does well….

    Read More.

    JohnAbella

    JohnAbella02

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 08:01
    The Flexy-Hand – Innovative, Useful, Realistic Looking 3D Printed Prosthetic Hand #MakeTheWorld #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    FlexyHand

    The Flexy-Hand – Innovative, Useful, Realistic Looking 3D Printed Prosthetic Hand.

    …One man, by the name of Steve Wood has taken the idea of 3D printing prosthetics to new level. We are used to seeing 3D printed robotic hands that look… well… quite “robotic”.  Wood, however, the founder of a mechanical design consultancy company called Gyrobot Ltd., has create a new type of prosthetic hand, using very unique ideas. He calls the design the “Flexy-Hand“.

    His hand looks very much like a real human hand. Even more impressive though, is that it also operates much like a human hand. By using Filaflex flexible filament, Wood has made a hand that is like nothing else that we have seen before.

    “I have to say the idea is all mine, but the inspiration to make something different comes from many of the other prosthetics out there, which generally use traditional pin style hinge joints,” Wood explained to 3DPrint.com. “Wherever there is a fastener, there is always a chance it becomes an un-fastener, and works itself loose, so screws/nuts and bolts should be avoided wherever possible. Especially in an application such as rotational hinge pins. Also “vitamins” (non-3D printed parts) are items that need to be sourced at the right sizes, which isn’t always possible in some locations. The flexible hinges in my design can be printed at the right size first hit (hopefully) on the same 3D printer. This also makes a tool free assembly possible.”

    Wood used his expertise as an engineer and CAD designer to perfect his prosthetic hand to work very much like a human hand. Like a human hand, the Flexy-Hand uses tendons to operate each finger individually. These tendons are made out of strips of Filaflex, and work surprisingly well. In fact, with a simple motor added to this design, it should work very well to grasp and pick up objects….

    Read More.


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 07:00
    Deezmaker 3D Printers / Hackerspace @ Pasadena, CA – #3DxRetail #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    Pasted Image 3 20 14 1 03 AM

    [3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I'll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores -- sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. Only time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public. There appears to be enough interest and pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone's game!]

    Deezmaker 3D Printers / Hackerspace @ Pasadena, CA:

    Deezmaker manufactures 3-D printer kits which are sold online and at its Pasadena, California retail store. The Pasadena retail store was also the first 3-D printer store on the West Coast (and only the second one in the country). Opened in late 2012, Deezmaker’s in-store hackerspace gives 3-D printing enthusiasts a place to get together and find ways to innovate and move the field forward.  Monthly open meetings for the community on the first Sunday of each month have become local focal points for 3D printing evangelism.

    Deezmaker was a Kickstarter success story from its beginnings. A 2012 campaign for the first printer (the Bukobot) launched the company, raising roughly four times the minimum requested amount. A subsequent Kickstarter campaign in summer 2013 for the new, portable Bukito printer raised 2.5 times its requested goal.

    Currently, Deezmaker is getting ready to fulfill its Bukito Kickstarter orders and ongoing Bukobot orders, laying out plans for more courses, and developing great collaborations….

    Read More.

    DiegoPorqueras

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 06:01
    Heated Build Chambers Don’t Have to be That Complex

    800px-HBC_open_door_view

    Looking to improve the quality of your 3D prints? Worried about peeling, warping, and de-laminating layers? All you need is to do is make a heated build chamber!

    The heated build chamber is one of the patents that the big 3D printer company owns (we won’t point any fingers), and that’s why you don’t see it as a feature on any of the “consumer” grade 3D printers. But that won’t stop people from making their own!

    [Repkid] just finished a wiki page on this topic, and it’s a great way to build a heated chamber — if you have the space for it! He’s built a large wooden enclosure for his RepRap out of MDF sheets. Double-ply cardboard is used as thin insulation, although we imagine if you’re building something this large you might as well use some commercial insulation.

    The chamber is heated by a blow dryer which is mounted off the back of the box, and the heat is controlled by changing the speed setting of the dryer. A laser cut vent allows for further adjustment. If you want to get really fancy, it would be very easy to install a thermostat PID controller that could regulate the temperature more accurately. To prevent overheating the electronics, all the control boards are also outside of the box.

    [Repkid's] RepRap does not have a heated bed, but with the heated build chamber he can print ABS without any warping — just take a look!

    800px-HBC_result1

    The white piece is with the HBC, and the red, without. Not bad!

    Do you have a heated build chamber for your 3D printer? If so, we’d love to see it!

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 06:00
    Chicago ♥ 3D Printing #3DThursday #3DPrinting

    IHeartChicago

    Margarita Korol shares her visit to the 3D Hubs Chicago launch party last week, an event that drew together a number of significant players in the lively 3D printing scene in the second city earmarked for Obama’s national manufacturing initiative:

    Last night dozens of Chicagoans congregated at ThoughtWorks’ headquarters to revel in the growing connectivity in the community over 3D printing technologies. Dutch-based 3D Hubs gave us the excuse to celebrate, announcing that their Chicago operations were officially under way. The online network that connects owners of 3D means of production with those who want to use them worldwide joined forces with the popular Chicago Hardware Startup Meetup and Catalyze Chicago for the night that featured live demos with local Isis3D and ProofX. Speakers provided real world applications including JP Brown on 3D scanning and printing at the Field Museum, and Mike Vasquez, a materials engineer in sports technology.

    …I had originally stumbled upon 3D Hubs in February in search of a last minute printer for some seasonal hearts I set my sights on printing and stringing on pimp gold chains for an upcoming art sale at Revolution Brewery. The week before, I visited one of the gurus at Pumping Station 1 to execute my first 3D printing project, a design I found on Thingiverse. It was a pretty empowering experience that left me wanting more, and I was happy to locate one of the twelve Chicago hubs, a civil engineer named Anthony who owned a couple of machines. A couple days later, we met at a Starbucks in Wicker Park where Anthony handed off a satchel of plastic hearts and we geeked out over printers. I’m planning on getting my little brother in San Diego a PrintrBot Simple so he can open his own hub….

    Read More.

    Pasted Image 3 17 14 11 58 PM

    TomBurtonwood

    Pasted Image 3 18 14 12 01 AM


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 05:45
    #3DThursday Explores the Explosion of Brick-and-Mortar #3DPrinting #3DxRetail Stores Worldwide!

    3D Printing Skill Badge

    3DxRetail: This week for #3DThursday, I’ll highlight the recent explosion in desktop 3D printer brick-and-mortar retail stores — sharing a scattering of these unusual locations from all across the world. While many locations consider it essential to declare themselves the first (or first for their region) and other superlatives, time will tell which particular version of this phenomena will be sustainable and hold the interest of the public.

    • Will it be the high street boutique model, displaying a small smattering of printers and printed parts perched on pedestals around architecturally-forward interiors — like perfume, estate jewelry, or rare collectible sneakers?
    • Will the craft and hobby model take hold — places packing densely with the tools, paints, and other accessories local regulars crave to help them produce and finish their printed creations, much like you might have seen in the thriving scale model and dollhouse specialty stores a decade ago, before online and fast shipping from catalogs killed off all but the hardiest shops?
    • Will the service bureau model from the 90s be granted new life — where local businesses can get bids for not only the use of the machines, but also, even more precious, the expertise of the in-house fabrication designers and technicians?
    • Or maybe the best value per square foot requires the elimination of all of this overhead, following the lead of the mobile phone and automotive industries to create barebones and pop-up local showrooms where paid-by-commission salesmen transform the merely curious into “3D printer operators” by putting them “behind the wheel” of the very latest, next-year’s-model machines?

    Thankfully, there appears to be enough interest and enough pioneering spirit that solving the 3DxRetail mystery could still be anyone’s game!


    649-1
    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 03:01
    Meet Lynx, a (costly) Offline Password Keeper

    Maybe because he didn’t want to wait for the Mooltipass to be produced, [davidhend] built himself his own offline password keeper, named Lynx.

    It is based around an Arduino Pro 328, a 2.8″ TFT touch screen, an RFID card reader, an FTDI basic breakout and finally a li-ion battery. Lynx is therefore self-powered and uses an RFID card to later read the XOR-encrypted passwords located in a SD card. A USB serial connection is used to send the passwords to the computer, which also charges the battery. The current BoM cost is around $220 but we’re quite sure it can be made for much cheaper when not using pre-made boards. Looking at the official GitHub repository tells us that the XOR key is stored inside the microcontroller and that Lynx checks the RFID card code to allow encryption/decryption.

    On a side note, we recently published a FAQ on the official Mooltipass GitHub. You’re welcome to let us know what questions we may have forgotten.

    Filed under: Arduino Hacks, hardware

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 01:40
    Random Antique Store Keys Open Vintage Locks

    DSCN0383Andover, Minn.-based maker and artist Frank E. Yost reminds us that a difficult problem often has a simple answer.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 01:34
    Multimeters Without A Country: Fluke’s Broad Trademark Bans Yellow Multimeter Imports

    fluke-killing-sparkfun-for-being-yellow

    Check out this SparkFun Digital Multimeter. Does it make your blood boil to see them ripping off Fluke by using the color yellow? From SparkFun’s side of the story that’s exactly what’s happened here. They have a shipment of 2000 of these things stuck in customs. The trademark being infringed upon can be found in their article. Fluke owns the trademark on multimeters with a dark face and yellow border. Great. This seems like a wonderful idea, right up there with Apple owning tablets that are shaped like a piece of paper.

    Okay, so if you’re not crying big fat tears for Fluke being taken advantage of in this way let’s talk about more immediate issues than fixing trademark, patent, copyright, and all of the other screw-the-little-guy type of laws (not that SparkFun is necessarily the little guy but you know what we mean). The DMMs sitting in a warehouse are costing SparkFun $150 per day. We believe they have no option of choosing a warehouse with a lower cost as we must be talking a pallet or two, right? The only two options they do have are shipping them back to China where they were manufactured, or having them destroyed. The former will cost more in re-import tariffs than the cost of the product, and the latter comes with a $150/hour disposal fee and no metric on which to judge how long it would actually take. We hate seeing this kind of waste, but sure enough 2000 DMMs are headed for the shredder in a couple of days.

    We know you already have your flaming sword in hand, but simmer down for just a second. Fluke makes great products, ask anyone. And companies the world over defend their trademarks. Hopefully there will soon be a positive response from Fluke on this one. If you would like to politely encourage them to do the right thing we found Fluke’s Facebook page URL in the SparkFun comments thread. Both are worth browsing.

    [Thanks Chris via Reddit]

    Filed under: news, rants

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 01:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 8PM ET Wednesday night! (video)

    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! 8PM ET Wednesday night! (video).

  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 00:51
    New Project: DIY Hacks & How To’s: Desk Bell That Plays Sound Effects

    Img_0959Prank your friends and co-workers by modifying one so that it plays a bird chirping, gun fire, or other sounds.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Jeudi, Mars 20, 2014 - 00:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout! Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET (video)

    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout! Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET (video).

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