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Planet

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 21:00
    MRFF: 3D Bioprinting

    bioprint

    There were a few keynotes at this year’s Midwest RepRap festival, and somewhat surprisingly most of the talks weren’t given by the people responsible for designing your favorite printer. One of the most interesting talks was given by [Jordan Miller], [Andy Ta], and [Steve Kelly] about the use of RepRap and other 3D printing technologies in biotechnology and tissue engineering. Yep, in 50 years when you need a vital organ printed, this is where it’ll come from.

    [Jordan] got his start with tissue engineering and 3D printing with his work in printing three-dimensional sugar lattices that could be embedded in a culture medium and then dissolved. The holes left over from the sugar became the vasculature and capillaries that feed a cell culture. The astonishing success of his project and the maker culture prompted him and others to start the Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute to bring young makers into the scientific community. It’s a program hosted by Rice University and has seen an amazing amount of success in both research and getting makers into scientific pursuits.

    One of these young makers is [Andy Ta]. An economics major, [Andy] first heard of the maker and RepRap community a few years ago and bought a MakerBot Cupcake. This was a terrible printer, but it did get him involved in the community, hosting build workshops, and looking into 3D printing build around DLP-cured UV resin. At AMRI, [Andy] started looking at the properties of UV-cured resin, figuring out the right type of light, resin, and exposure to create a cured resin with the right properties for printing cell colonies. You can check out [Andy]‘s latest work on his webzone.

    [Steve Kelly] has also done some work at AMRI, but instead of the usual RepRap or DLP projector-based printers, he did work with shooting cell cultures out of an ink jet print head. His initial experiments involved simply refilling an ink jet cartridge with a bacterial colony and discovering the cells actually survived the process of being heated and shot out of a nozzle at high speed. Most ink jets printers don’t actually lay out different colors on a precise grid, making it unusable for growing cell cultures. [Steve] solved this problem with an inkjet controller shield attached to a RepRap. All of [Steve]‘s work is documented on his Github.

    It’s all awesome work, and the beginnings of both bioengineering based on 3D printers, and an amazing example of what amateur scientists and professional makers can do when they put their heads together. Video link below.

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 21:00
    MRRF: 3D Bioprinting

    bioprint

    There were a few keynotes at this year’s Midwest RepRap festival, and somewhat surprisingly most of the talks weren’t given by the people responsible for designing your favorite printer. One of the most interesting talks was given by [Jordan Miller], [Andy Ta], and [Steve Kelly] about the use of RepRap and other 3D printing technologies in biotechnology and tissue engineering. Yep, in 50 years when you need a vital organ printed, this is where it’ll come from.

    [Jordan] got his start with tissue engineering and 3D printing with his work in printing three-dimensional sugar lattices that could be embedded in a culture medium and then dissolved. The holes left over from the sugar became the vasculature and capillaries that feed a cell culture. The astonishing success of his project and the maker culture prompted him and others to start the Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute to bring young makers into the scientific community. It’s a program hosted by Rice University and has seen an amazing amount of success in both research and getting makers into scientific pursuits.

    One of these young makers is [Andy Ta]. An economics major, [Andy] first heard of the maker and RepRap community a few years ago and bought a MakerBot Cupcake. This was a terrible printer, but it did get him involved in the community, hosting build workshops, and looking into 3D printing build around DLP-cured UV resin. At AMRI, [Andy] started looking at the properties of UV-cured resin, figuring out the right type of light, resin, and exposure to create a cured resin with the right properties for printing cell colonies. You can check out [Andy]‘s latest work on his webzone.

    [Steve Kelly] has also done some work at AMRI, but instead of the usual RepRap or DLP projector-based printers, he did work with shooting cell cultures out of an ink jet print head. His initial experiments involved simply refilling an ink jet cartridge with a bacterial colony and discovering the cells actually survived the process of being heated and shot out of a nozzle at high speed. Most ink jets printers don’t actually lay out different colors on a precise grid, making it unusable for growing cell cultures. [Steve] solved this problem with an inkjet controller shield attached to a RepRap. All of [Steve]‘s work is documented on his Github.

    It’s all awesome work, and the beginnings of both bioengineering based on 3D printers, and an amazing example of what amateur scientists and professional makers can do when they put their heads together. Video link below.

    Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Medical hacks

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 20:59
    NEW PRODUCTS – The MagPi Issues 18 and 19

    Screenshot 3 18 14 3 48 PM

    NEW PRODUCTS – The MagPi Issues 18 and 19: About The MagPi – from The MagPi themselves!

    We produce a magazine with the intent to help and offer advice to users of the Raspberry Pi. This started out as a simple idea on the well known forums, with a few of us getting together and deciding on a loose outline of what we wanted to achieve.

    From issue 18:

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has just released the Pi NoiR, an adapted version of their camera with the infra-red filter removed. This month, there’s a great article from Andrew Back of RS Components, where he takes you through the steps he used to create a night vision camera to catch critters in his back garden.

    Issue 18 introduces you to a great program called PiVision which brings an attractive GUI, allowing you to control the module through its native apps. This month features a very informative article on the Raspberry Pi at CERN and a look at using Scratch with BrickPi.

    There is also the first in a series of articles titled ‘Project Curacao’, an environmental monitoring system utilizing the Raspberry Pi which will be hung unattended on a radio tower on the island nation of Curacao. Exotic!

    From issue 19:

    Are you bored of having your presents delivered by the post office? If you fancy a change, why not have your own Pi-powered quadcopter air drop them in? Andy Baker begins his series on building this flying machine. In this issue, he covers the parts required, their function, and some of the coding used for lift off.

    There’s also a great article on OpenELEC, bringing you On Demand TV to your Raspberry Pi so you never have to miss an episode again! Claire Price continues with a fantastic article on Sonic Pi which will have your Raspberry Pi performing sing-alongs.

    If you want to be savvy with your heating and electricity bills, without turning the thermostat down, why not cast your eye over an article on environmental monitoring. Alternatively, to warm you up, the MagPi returns to Project Curacao to look at the environmental subsystem used in this remote sensing project.

    Finally, if that’s not enough to keep you busy, why not paint an electronic masterpiece with XLoBorg? Andy Wilson looks at scrolling an RSS feed on an LCD via GPIO plus we pay a visit to the Pi Store.

    In stock and shipping now!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 20:38
    New Project: Hack Your Closet!

    HackYourCloset_2661 cropWhy live with closets the way someone else built them? Hack your closets for your own needs. Add a lower hanger bar for shorter clothing or to put kids' jackets within easy reach. Add shelves for convenient storage of commonly used items. This is an easy project that can be completed in a weekend.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 20:00
    Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine (VIDEO)

    Gabe Barcia-Colombo: My DNA vending machine:

    Vending machines generally offer up sodas, candy bars and chips. Not so for the one created by TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo. This artist has dreamed up a DNA Vending Machine, which dispenses extracted human DNA, packaged in a vial along with a collectible photo of the person who gave it. It’s charming and quirky, but points out larger ethical issues that will arise as access to biotechnology increases.

    Read More.

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 19:06
    New Raspberry Pi camera mode released @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi

    NewImage

    Raspberrypi.org has sorted out a new set of mode for their camera board. They are also calling for pictures and video using the new mode and will feature the best entries on their site!

    When the Raspberry Pi camera was released, the eagle-eyed among you noticed that the camera hardware itself can support various high frame rate modes, but that the software could ‘only’ manage 30 frames per second in its high-definition video mode.

    There’s is no hardware limitation in the Raspberry Pi itself. It’s quite capable of handling these high frame rate modes, but it does require a certain amount of effort to work out these new ‘modes’ inside the camera software. At the original release of the camera, two modes were provided: a stills capture mode, which offers the full resolution of the sensor (2592×1944), and a 1080p video mode (1920x1080p). Those same eagle-eyed people will see that these modes have different aspect ratios – the ratio of width to height. Stills outputs 4:3 (like 35mm film), video 16:9 (wide screen).

    This creates a problem when previewing stills captures, since the preview uses the video mode so it can run at 30 frames per second (fps) – not only is the aspect of the preview different, but because the video mode ‘crops’ the sensor (i.e. takes a 1920×1080 windows from the centre), the field of view in preview mode is very different from the actual capture.

    We had some work to do to develop new modes for high frame rates, and also fix the stills preview mode so that is matches the capture mode.

    So now, finally, some very helpful chaps at Broadcom, with some help from Omnivision, the sensor manufacturer, have found some spare time to sort out these modes, and not just that but to add some extra goodness while they were at it. (Liz interjects: The Raspberry Pi Foundation is not part of Broadcom – we’re a customer of theirs – but we’ve got a good relationship and the Foundation’s really grateful for the volunteer help that some of the people at Broadcom offer us from time to time. You guys rock: thank you!)

    The result is that we now have a set of mode as follows :

    • 2592×1944 1-15fps, video or stills mode, Full sensor full FOV, default stills capture
    • 1920×1080 1-30fps, video mode, 1080p30 cropped
    • 1296×972 1-42fps, video mode, 4:3 aspect binned full FOV. Used for stills preview in raspistill.
    • 1296×730 1-49fps, video mode, 16:9 aspect , binned, full FOV (width), used for 720p
    • 640×480 42.1-60fps, video mode, up to VGAp60 binned
    • 640×480 60.1-90fps, video mode, up to VGAp90 binned

    I’ve introduced a new word in the that list. Binned. This is how we can get high frame rates. Binning means combining pixels from the sensor together in a ‘bin’ in the analogue domain. As well as reducing the amount of data, this can also improve low light performance as it averages out sensor ‘noise’ in the absence of quantisation noise introduced by the analogue to digital converters (ADCs), which are the bits of electronics in the sensor that convert the analogue information created by incoming photons to digital numbers.

    Read more.


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NewImage

    Raspberry Pi Camera Board – The Raspberry Pi Camera Module is a custom designed add-on for Raspberry Pi. It attaches to Raspberry Pi by way of one of the two small sockets on the board upper surface. This interface uses the dedicated CSI interface, which was designed especially for interfacing to cameras. The CSI bus is capable of extremely high data rates, and it exclusively carries pixel data. Read more.


  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 19:00
    This Paper Microscope Costs Just 97 Cents #makereducation

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    Foldscope, a $.97 paper microscope, is a great tool for educators on a budget, from Smithsonianmag:

    Microscopes have come a long way since eyeglass makers started using their lenses to look closer and closer at the world around them. But they’ve also gotten a lot more expensive. A modern scanning electron microscope could cost a lab $250,000. A nice desktop scope will set you back anywhere from $500 to $1,000—not a practical purchase, and sometimes out of the budget for clinics and research projects that could really use one.

    What would an affordable microscope look like? Well, it’d be simple, and it’d be made out of cheap materials, but it would still be good enough to get the job done. It might look something like a microscope made out of paper, for less than a dollar.

    Stanford scientists have developed what they call the Foldscope, a paper microscope that fits in your pocket and can be assembled in the field, in a lab, or anywhere you are. You can watch creator Manu Prakash talking about and assembling the scope in the video above. And it works too. According to Foldscope:

    Foldscope is an origami-based print-and-fold optical microscope that can be assembled from a flat sheet of paper. Although it costs less than a dollar in parts, it can provide over 2,000X magnification with sub-micron resolution (800nm), weighs less than two nickels (8.8 g), is small enough to fit in a pocket (70 × 20 × 2 mm3), requires no external power, and can survive being dropped from a 3-story building or stepped on by a person. Its minimalistic, scalable design is inherently application-specific instead of general-purpose, gearing towards applications in global health, field based citizen science and K12-science education.

    Foldscope is also currently looking for people to help them test out their origami contraption:

    We will be choosing 10,000 people who would like to test the microscopes in a variety of settings and help us generate an open source biology/microscopy field manual written by people from all walks of life.

    From clinics in Nigeria to field sites in that Amazon, the scope could give people a cheaper, easier way to access the tiny worlds around them.

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:53
    From STEAM to STREAM

    Stream crop

    This redesign of the Evil Mad Scientist STEAM t-shirt includes Robotics!

    Over at RasterWeb, Pete writes:

    I love the Evil Mad Scientist STEAM T-shirt but I thought there was something missing, so I changed it to STREAM because… Robots.

    Remember to stream big, my friends!

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:22
    NEW PRODUCT – Wolfson Audio Card

    NewImage

    NEW PRODUCT – Wolfson Audio Card: The Wolfson Audio Card, produced by Element14 in collaboration with Wolfson, offers Raspberry Pi® users similar flexibility to a PC sound-card to capture audio alongside their camera, and experiment with stereo digital capture and playback.

    This audiophile-quality add-on is great for intense audio experimenters! If you just want to have higher-quality audio playback, check out our low cost USB audio card, it’s perfect for playing music, movie soundtracks, etc. and works well with the Pi.

    NewImage

    The Wolfson Pi Audio Card is based on Wolfson WM5102 audio hub codes. The WM5102 is a highly-integrated low-power audio system for smartphones, tablets and other portable audio devices. It combines wide-band telephony voice processing with a flexible, high-performance audio hub CODEC. The WM5102 digital core provides a powerful combination of fixed-function signal processing blocks with a programmable DSP. These are supported by a fully-flexible, all-digital audio mixing and routing engine with sample rate converters, for wide use-case flexibility. Two stereo headphone drivers each provide stereo ground-referenced or mono BTL outputs, with noise levels as low as 2.3µVRMS for hi-fi quality line or headphone output. The CODEC also features stereo 2W Class-D speaker outputs, a dedicated BTL earpiece output and PDM for external speaker amplifiers. A signal generator for controlling haptics devices is included; vibe actuators can connect directly to the Class-D speaker output, or via an external driver on the PDM output interface. All inputs, outputs and system interfaces can function concurrently.

    Ideal for applications including VoIP, gaming, high quality audio capture, digital audio processing, and audio rendering. XBMC and media streaming, internet radio, networked audio, and DLNA audio rendering.

    Caution! The Wolfson Audio Card comes with a very small translucent screw that helps connect it to the Raspberry Pi. Be careful when you open your package! Only for use with Rev 2(Model A or B) Raspberry Pi’s with the P5 Header.

    NewImage
    In stock and shipping now!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:02
    Walking in a Maker Wonderland: Makerland Day 1

    In the "Python and Ruby Sitting in a Tree" workshop, attendees programmed an Arduino to interact with sensors such as the DHT11 temperature and humidity sensor, the VCNL4000 light sensor, the HC-SR404 ultrasonic ranging module, and the HC-SR501 PIR sensor module.The first day of Makerland, a new European maker conference, began with informative and inspirational talks from makers and maker pros.

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:01
    Retrotechtacular: Breaking Atoms to Break the Ice

    retrotechtacular-lenin-nuclear-icebreaker

    This documentary from 1959 gives a satisfyingly thorough look inside a nuclear powered icebreaking ship called Lenin. This actually set a couple of world’s-firsts: it was the first nuclear powered surface vessel and the first civilian vessel to be powered thusly.

    The ship was built to clear shipping paths to the northern ports of Russia. Testing of both ice and models of the ship design point to the ability to break ice layers that are two meters thick. This requires a lot of power as ice-breakers generally use their hull shape and gravity to break the ice by driving up onto it to bend the ice to the breaking point. The Lenin achieved this power using its nuclear reactor to heat steam which drove electric generators. The energy produced drove three screws to power the vessel.

    Of course this was back in the day when control panels were substantial, which you can get a peek at starting half-way through the twenty-minute film. This includes a demonstration of the ship’s network of radiation sensors which alert the control room, and sound a local alarm when they are triggered. During it’s 30-year operational life the vessel had a couple of accidents stemming from refueling operations. You can find more on that over at the Wikipedia page, but stick with us after the jump to see the vintage reel.

    [Thanks CNK via EnglishRussia (possibly NSFW)]

    Retrotechtacular is a weekly column featuring hacks, technology, and kitsch from ages of yore. Help keep it fresh by sending in your ideas for future installments.

    Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Retrotechtacular

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:00
    Glowing sculptures that visualize bitcoin and bullet wounds #ArtTuesday

    NewImage

    Seen above is James Clar’s work entitled Two Times One Sun- a visualization of the sun from two different perspectives, rising and setting. Wired has a great piece on the artist and his work which features 3D printing, glowy lights, and clear, complex work.

    James Clar insists that he’s not a control freak, though there’s evidence that suggests otherwise. For starters, Clar’s studio is impressively tidy. The Brooklyn-based artist’s studio is filled with wires, 3-D printed components and his bold-colored fluorescent sculptures, but everything has its place. “I try to keep very orderly and structured and systematic,” he says. “Otherwise things get out of control.”

    Then there’s the fact that the artist himself kinda admits it: “A lot of the work I do is about control,” he tells me. “I’m trying to have control over the medium.” Even with a confession like this, control freak isn’t quite right. The word connotes uptightness, a lack of flexibility, neither of which describes the very genial Clar or his colorful work.

    “What I do is a craft,” he clarifies. “And I treat it like a craft.” Clar is known for creating glowing light installations out of linear fluorescent tubes. The artist builds his lighting systems from scratch, beginning by designing each piece in computer programs like Adobe Illustrator and Maya. Though the lights look neon, it’s actually just a clever use of colored filters, which Clar prints out via a high-resolution printer and slips inside the tubes to create the glowing colors you see. Then using a Makerbot, he prints customized electrical connectors that hold each piece together and hide the wire routing.

    NewImage

    The piece above is called Bitcoin Spiral and displays data taken from the Mt.Gox bitcoin market which it then displays on the lights in the work.

    It’s a complex system distilled down to a clean, streamlined finished product. All of Clar’s works have a sense of purpose, which is perhaps the most compelling thing about they outside of their bold aesthetics. “For the most part I’m not really into art that’s messy or happenstance,” he says.

    Read more.

    NewImage

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 18:00
    Design a Maker Faire Info Kiosk & Win a Trip to the Bay Area!

    Maker Faire Design ChallengeDesign an information kiosk utilizing SketchUp software and ShopBot CNC machines and you could win a trip to the Bay Area Maker Faire!

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 16:57
    Open-Source Furniture

    wikiboothOpen-source hardware isn’t just machines and electronics, With the rise in popularity of CNC routers and laser cutters, OSHW has expanded into furniture. The result is a fabrication movement where designs are shared globally but fabricated locally and parametric design enables infinite configuration for personal fabrication. Open Desk The OpenDesk project […]

    Read more on MAKE


  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 16:00
    Get OpenCV up and running on #BeagleBoneBlack @TXInstruments @BeagleBoardOrg

    YouTube user, Michael Robinson, shows us how to get OpenCV up and running on the BeagleBone Black.


    BeagleBone Adafruit Industries Unique fun DIY electronics and kitsEach Tuesday is BeagleBone Black Day here Adafruit! What is the BeagleBone? The BeagleBones are a line of affordable single-board Linux computers (SBCs) created by Texas Instruments. New to the Bone? Grab one of our Adafruit BeagleBone Black Starter Packs and check out our extensive resources available on the Adafruit Learning System including a guide to setting up the Adafruit BeagleBone IO Python Library. We have a number of Bone accessories including add-on shields (called “capes”) and USB devices to help you do even more with your SBC. Need a nice display to go along with your Bone? Check out our fine selection of HDMI displays, we’ve tested all of them with the Beagle Bone Black!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 16:00
    “Going Places” by Paul A. Reynolds, Peter H. Reynolds #makereducation

    Cvr9781442466081 9781442466081 lg

    Going Places by Paul A. Reynolds and Peter H. Reynolds, a book about a go-cart contest, comes out today from Simon & Schuster! The book looks like a great fit for young engineers who think both inside and outside the box.

    A go-cart contest inspires imagination to take flight in this picture book for creators of all ages, with art from New York Times bestselling illustrator Peter H. Reynolds.

    It’s time for this year’s Going Places contest! Finally. Time to build a go-cart, race it—and win. Each kid grabs an identical kit, and scrambles to build.

    Everyone but Maya. She sure doesn’t seem to be in a hurry…and that sure doesn’t look like anybody else’s go-cart!

    But who said it had to be a go-cart? And who said there’s only one way to cross the finish line?

    Graexc 48471889 9781442466081 in01 jpg

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 15:01
    From Saw Dust to Stove Fuel

    brisquit maker

    [Alois Schmid] is an avid woodworker, and as such, he makes a lot of saw dust. Unfortunately, saw dust is kind of wasteful — it doesn’t burn very well unless it is compressed… so he built his own wood briquette press!

    He originally looked at purchasing a machine designed for this, until he discovered they run upwards of 10,000 Euros. You could buy an amazing CNC mill for that! Needless to say, it was out of the question.

    He started by purchasing a new more efficient dust extractor and an electric log splitter, and then he built an ingenious feeder system. He’s replaced the log splitter blade with a long metal dowel with a protrusion at the end (helps keeps the briquettes in one piece), which is slightly smaller than the compression tube he’s built.

    The really cool part of this build is his home-made auger system. He’s cut out metal donuts from sheet metal and cut notches around the inside diameter — he then bent them into a semi-spiral, and welded a whole series of them onto a metal bar.

    38

    To prevent the wood chips from bridging over the auger, he’s also made wooden gears that simply follow the top of the auger — he’s really thought of everything! All in, the project cost a bit shy of 1000 Euros — still a pricey investment, but well worth it considering the amount of wood he goes through — and at 10% of the cost of a commercial offering, we think he’s done a pretty good job!

    The project is definitely worth a read, and you should also check out his drool-worthy workshop!

    [Thanks Joe!]

    Filed under: green hacks, tool hacks

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Google Summer of Code 2014 #makereducation

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    Student Application Deadline has been set for Google’s 10th Summer of Code – 2014: March 21 at 19:00 UTC

    Google Summer of Code 2014 has been announced! Please take a look at the Timeline for more information on deadlines.

    About Google Summer of Code

    Google Summer of Code is a global program that offers student developers stipends to write code for various open source software projects. We work with many open source, free software, and technology-related groups to identify and fund projects over a three month period. Since its inception in 2005, the program has brought together over 7,500 successful student participants from 97 countries and over 7,000 mentors from over 100 countries worldwide to produce over 50 million lines of code. Through Google Summer of Code, accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor or mentors from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios and the opportunity for employment in areas related to their academic pursuits. In turn, the participating projects are able to more easily identify and bring in new developers. Best of all, more source code is created and released for the use and benefit of all.

    Read more.


    Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 15:00
    Typographica’s Favorite Typefaces of 2013 #ArtTuesday

    Screen Shot 2014 03 12

    Typographica has chosen their 53 favorite typefaces for 2013. What’s your favorite?

    This year marks another step in the typographic diversi­fi­cation we observed in our previous annual. The global spread of independent font makers and the variety of new ideas in type design continues unabated.

    As evidence of that diversity, the 53 typefaces selected from 2013 were created by designers from at least 20 countries…

    This new phase of globalization and democratization of the font market began in earnest about a decade ago, propelled by newly accessible digital tools, online commerce, and post-graduate education in type design. It is a sea change. For centuries, places like Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, Lebanon, and New Zealand were vastly under­repre­sent­ed in a type design community that was dominated by western Europe and North America. (And this only goes for Latin-based type. The burg­eon­ing production of fonts in other scripts tells another fascinating story.) We will have much more detail about these changes in an upcoming report by Ruxandra Duru on the current state of typefounding around the world.

    The diversity of the contributors to our annual is also invig­orating. This year’s writers are almost as international as the typefaces they cover. More importantly, they represent a variety of perspectives from both sides of font making and using. Type designers, print and web designers, educators, writers, historians — we can all learn from the manifold ways that people from such divergent backgrounds perceive a typeface.

    Read more.

  • Mardi, Mars 18, 2014 - 14:56
    Innovation Economy – 25 Makers Who Are Reinventing the American Dream – Popular Mechanics @PopMech – Limor “Ladyada” Fried @adafruit

    Cover Iphone
    Innovation Economy – 25 Makers Who Are Reinventing the American Dream – Popular Mechanics @PopMech – Limor “Ladyada” Fried @adafruit.

    Now, as never before, DIYers are empowered to design, manufacture, and market their creations. Call it the maker movement, a fresh industrial revolution, or the new innovation economy. By any name, it’s a great time to be an innovator. And these visionaries are leading the way.

    G+Inside Promo

    Ipad Spread

    READ MORE – Our Ladyada is featured along with a whole bunch of awesome makers!


    While working on her master’s degree at MIT, Limor Fried used to relax at night by building synthesizers and other DIY electronics projects, then posting the instructions online. After fans started asking for help locating parts, she launched Adafruit. The company now sells electronics kits with open-source licenses, encouraging would-be inventors to experiment and have fun. The popular MintyBoost, for example, is a mobile-device charger housed in an Altoids-size tin. Fried’s site includes vibrant forums and video tutorials, and she awards badges for coding and welding. Her work is clearly making an impact: After watching the pink-haired engineer’s webcasts, one girl asked her father, “Are there any boy engineers?”

    Mission statement: Fried calls Adafruit “an educational company that just happens to have a gift shop at the end.”

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