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  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 00:00
    Imogen Heap’s Music-Controlling Gloves #WearableWednesday



    Cool performance by Imogen Heap, Q&A on the glove controller below:

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 23:00
    Responsive Bike Jacket #WearableWednesday



    Parsons design & technology student Nour Chamoun writes in about her responsive bike jacket:

    The bike jacket is composed of 3 features:

    1- 2 tilt sensors on each arm to sense the right or left motioning of arms, flashing lights indicating right or left.

    2- An accelerometer to sense the deceleration of the cyclist, flashing a red warning light on the back of the jacket.

    3- An infrared sensor to the left side of the cyclist to sense if any vehicles or other cyclists are getting too close and sets off a small vibrating motor to warn the cyclist.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 23:00
    Gundam Cosplay Tutorial


    unicorn gundam costume

    Taking on the task of building a mech or a Gundam is not simple. You’re committing to spending a lot of time and depending on the materials used, a fair amount of cash. If you’re interested though, RPF user Clivelee has put together an informative tutorial (it even has a table of contents) to walk you through the process. He created the Unicorn Gundam pictured above, so he knows his stuff. He goes over planning, materials, where to find the right tools, and each part of the body. Here’s a sample:

    gundam_mecha_cosplay_costume_tutorial___lesson_1_1_by_miragecld-d5evr29

    You can see the entire tutorial at The RPF.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 22:00
    Pixeldelic Vest #WearableWednesday


    explor2

    explor3

    Joshua Herbert made this vest with 324 LEDs! Brookleynn Morris caught up with him at the Exploratorium wearables event last week and writes in:

    Joshua Herbert’s Pixeldelic leather vests are covered in 324 LEDs that can be programmed to play any pattern or image. Anything seen on a computer screen, including videos right off of YouTube, live video and hand drawn patterns can be shown on the vest.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 21:30
    Five Ways to Use a Plastic Trash Can in Cosplay


    trash can helmet

    Plastic trash cans are affordable and can be found just about anywhere. Even grocery stores usually stock smaller models. They come in various shapes from round domes to standing rectangles, and you can choose from different heights. All of those factors make them an ideal material for cosplay. Whether you leave them as is and paint them or cut them up to utilize the plastic in a different way – there are options. Here are five suggestions on how to use a plastic trash can in a costume:

    trash can - r2-d2

    Picture from Geek Mom

    Astromech droid – When I see a trash can with a flip top dome, I can’t help but think of R2-D2 from Star Wars. And he’s far from the only astromech in the saga. To make the kid-sized costumed, you’d just have to cut out the bottom of the trash can, create armholes, secure the lid (you could wrap the dome part in papier mache), and then paint the trash can to look like Artoo or one of his pals. You can take it to the next level by adding a red LED and sound effects.

    Captain America’s shield – Have a round Rubbermaid-style trash can that comes with a lid? That round top is just waiting to become Captain America’s shield. You’d just need to prime it, use a protractor and pencil to sketch out the concentric circles, use a template to outline the star, and carefully paint it. It won’t be as strong as vibranium, but you shouldn’t be trying to stop bullets with it anyway.

    trash can - eve costume

    EVE from WALL-E – A tiny trash can with a dome is perfect for another kind of robot: EVE from WALL-E. Again, cut out the bottom and make armholes (be sure to cushion them) and add some LED lighting. For the robot’s face, you have to cut a hole in the lid and make a face plate from the plastic, mesh, and black pantyhose. Drwave has a helpful Instructable with all the details.

    Helmets – Some office-sized trash cans are smaller at the bottom but flare into a wider opening at the time. Those types of trash cans are wonderfully suited for helmets. You can slide them on without having to worry about it being too tight. Think about where you want the eyes and mouth to be, and once you’ve traced the outlines onto the trash can, use a Dremel or tin snips to cut away. From there you can add additions like craft foam, paint, horns, you name it.

    fett armor

    Armor – While Worbla, Sintra, and similar materials are wonderful for building armor, so are plastic garbage cans. You can slice and dice Boba Fett armor from 13 and 8 gallon trash cans. The Dented Helmet user AFettFullofDollars simply traced templates onto the trash cans to get the proper curves and cut them apart using tin snips. Not into Fett? You can also build a set of Iron Man Mark V armor.

    Top picture from Luis Linares.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 20:58
    LED Stego Flex Spike Hoodie #WearableWednesday



    Rawr! Build a stego spike hoodie with glowing LEDs! This easy project mashes up 3D printing and sewing to make your own super-custom flexible spiky hooded sweatshirt. Watch the video on YouTube and read the complete guide on the Adafruit Learning System to make your own.

    becky-stern-stego-spike-hoodie


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 20:00
    GEMMA + NeoPixel Ring Altimeter #WearableWednesday


    Bjzw1AZIQAARDm_

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 19:00
    Wearable Electronics with Becky Stern 04/9/2014 – Technical Difficulties





    Sorry everybody, no show today due to streaming tech problems! We’ll be back again next week!

    Join Becky Stern and friends every week as we delve into the wonderful world of wearables, live on YouTube. We’ll answer your questions, announce a discount code for the Adafruit store, and explore wearable components, techniques, special materials, tools, and projects you can build at home! Ask your wearables questions in the comments, and if your question is featured on a future episode, you’ll be entered to win the show giveaway!

    Show links:

    —————————————–
    Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube

    Join our weekly Show & Tell on G+ Hangouts On Air

    Watch our latest project videos

    New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System
    —————————————–

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 19:00
    Wearable Electronics with Becky Stern 04/9/2014 – LIVE 2pm ET



    Join Becky Stern and friends every week as we delve into the wonderful world of wearables, live on YouTube. We’ll answer your questions, announce a discount code for the Adafruit store, and explore wearable components, techniques, special materials, tools, and projects you can build at home! Ask your wearables questions in the comments, and if your question is featured on a future episode, you’ll be entered to win the show giveaway!

    Show links:

    —————————————–
    Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube

    Join our weekly Show & Tell on G+ Hangouts On Air

    Watch our latest project videos

    New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System
    —————————————–

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 19:00
    A look at the Sony Walkman TPS-L2


    Static.Squarespace
    Sony Walkman TPS-L2 @ Minimally Minimal.

    Legends. These are the truly great, revolutionary products that change everything. They elevate themselves from being merely a design icon to a cultural icon. The Sony Walkman TPS-L2 introduced in 1979 is one of those legends. It’s the first Walkman ever made and the first product I’m showcasing that’s older than myself. This was the first time music became truly portable making it historically more significant than even the iPod. The TPS-L2 has become a collector’s favorite so expect to pay a premium for one in good condition. I was lucky and purchased this from a university museum for a reasonable price.

    Fantastic write up and photos.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 18:55
    Why you’ll want a do-it-yourself, NSA-proof, open-source laptop (interview) #oshw


    Bunnie-Huang1
    Why you’ll want a do-it-yourself, NSA-proof, open-source laptop (interview) by Dean Takahashi.

    Andrew “Bunnie” Huang lists a bunch of reasons why you’ll want his open-source laptop, the Novena. You can modify it yourself so that its battery will last however long you want it to. You can inspect the software to see if there’s any present from the National Security Agency. And you don’t have to pay a tax to any big corporation just because you want to do some computing.

    It’s all part of the do-it-yourself hardware movement that is giving us things like 3D printing, cool robots, and virtual reality headsets. Huang recently unveiled his ARM-based quad-core Novena laptop, which has air-pump hinges so you can easily get under the hood and modify it. He is raising $250,000 on Crowd Supply so that he can build and ship initial units to crowdfunding contributors. The machine costs about $1,995 now, but that price could come down over time if volume sales are good.

    Huang, a Singapore resident who gained fame for hacking the original Microsoft Xbox game console,introduced the machine as a “labor of love” at the recent Embedded Systems Conference in San Jose, Calif. He hopes that a community of hardware hackers will rally around the machine and contribute all sorts of modifications. We interviewed him at the ESC.

    Read more.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 18:00
    MIT researchers bring Javascript to Google Glass #WearableWednesday


    032714-soldering

    MIT workshop brings Javascript to Google Glass on Network World:

    Brandyn White, a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland, and Scott Greenwald, a PhD candidate at MIT, led a workshop at the MIT Media Lab to showcase an open source project called WearScript, a Javascript environment that runs on Google Glass. The category of wearables is still evolving. Besides activity trackers and smartwatches, the killer wearable app is yet to be discovered because wearables don’t have the lean back or lean forward human-machine interface (HMI) of tablets and smartphones. Wearscript lets developers experiment with new user interface (UI) concepts and input devices to push beyond the HMI limits of wearables.

    The overblown reports of Google Glass privacy distract from the really important Google Glass discussion – how Glass micro apps can compress the time between user intent and action. Micro apps are smaller than apps and are ephemeral because they are used in an instant and designed to disappear from the user’s perception once completing their tasks. Because of the Glass wearable form factor, micro apps deviate from the LCD square and touchscreen/keyboard design of smartphone, tablet, and PC apps, and are intended to be hands-free and responsive in the moment. Well-designed Glass apps employ its UI to let the user do something that they could not otherwise do with another device. Glass’s notifications are a good example of this; want to get breaking news or preview important email without interruption from a phone or PC? Tilt your head up slightly and capture it in a glance, but if you want to read the news or give a detailed response to an email – better to pick up a smartphone, tablet or PC. The best consumer-facing Google Glass experiences highlight how apps can leverage this micro app programmable wearable form factor.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 18:00
    Test your server for Heartbleed (Adafruit is safe)


    Adafruit 2886
    Test your server for Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) – here is Adafruit. We are not vulnerable, we have not been running vulnerable versions of OpenSSL.

    The Heartbleed Bug is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. This weakness allows stealing the information protected, under normal conditions, by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet. SSL/TLS provides communication security and privacy over the Internet for applications such as web, email, instant messaging (IM) and some virtual private networks (VPNs).

    More @ Heartbleed. Be careful out there folks!

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 17:11
    Contruction worker uniforms – 鳶TOBIカセヤマ


    Img55

    These are great, putting this in wearables for today! Contruction worker uniforms – 鳶TOBIカセヤマ via Pink Noise.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 17:00
    NeoPixel Ripple Animation



    Balázs Suhajda describes his NeoPixel animation above as “a much improved version of my Arduino ripple effect with 2 waves and a fading background” — get it on Github.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 16:23
    “The he Raspberry Pi generation”


    Heartbleed
    Heartbleed Bug is making the news, but check out what they’re calling the next generation…

    “Someone with a moderate level of technical skills running their own scripts – the Raspberry Pi generation – would probably be able to launch attacks successfully and gain sensitive information.”

    BBCHeartbleed via Eben on Twitter.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 16:23
    “The Raspberry Pi generation”


    Heartbleed
    Heartbleed Bug is making the news, but check out what they’re calling the next generation…

    “Someone with a moderate level of technical skills running their own scripts – the Raspberry Pi generation – would probably be able to launch attacks successfully and gain sensitive information.”

    BBCHeartbleed via Eben on Twitter.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 16:00
    GEMMA NeoPixel Ring T-Shirt #WearableWednesday



  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 15:00
    Adorable Rapunzel and Flynn Costumes


    rapunzel and flynn costumes

    Whenever I consider a Rapunzel costume from Tangled, I immediately get hung up on the hair. She has a lot of it and about the only way to wear it and make it look believable is in the giant braid we saw in the movie. RPF user aelynn000 came up with a lightweight way to fashion the braid, and I’m impressed by how she put it together. It looks like it’s right from Tangled! She used foam strips covered by beige semi-shiny nylon and hair. Here’s how she tackled it:

    It will be done, however, by making beige-blonde coloured sleeves for foam strips ( about 3-4 inches wide and about 1.75 inches thick ) and then attaching wefts around the widths in intervals. The ‘sleeves’ are just to cover any white that may show through the hair. I’d rather have a slightly thin layer of hair with a coloured base as opposed to a 7 lb wig ( which I’ve heard many girls’ are ). The foam is pretty much weightless and the one tube which I wrapped in hair ( the method that was scrapped ) remains pretty close to weightless so so far, so good!

    Read more at The RPF.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 14:00
    25 Dresses for 25 Cities #WearableWednesday



    Jule Waibel was commissioned by Bershka to make 25 paper dresses, one for each of their strode windows around the world. via Feel Desain

    25cities

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