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Planet adafruit-industries

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 14:01
    Code Mode Light


    Adafruit 2964

    Code Mode Light @ Fairgoods.

    Jessica Hische has spent a lot of time learning web design and development over the past few years — and a lot of time asking her husband for help. “I noticed his concentration was impenetrable when he was coding and to bring him out of it was to wish death upon yourself. Once I started doing web work myself I would go intosilence zone mode or code mode often. Now I use the term to describe any time I’m in the zone with work and can ignore just about everything else.” She wanted to make something for her wall to let her studio mate know her code mode status, “so he wouldn’t think I was ignoring him. I just get too deep in work to know when he’s talking to me!”

    Jessica hand-lettered the words IN CODE MODE, and the light itself — which is made from powder-coated steel, powder-coated white aluminum, and translucent vinyl — was built by Palette Industries.

    You could make/mod a net-connected version or one that knew you were actually coding too!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 14:01
    LED Bib Necklace #WearableWednesday



    Agy writes:

    I’ve always wanted to make a bib necklace but didn’t get around to doing it as I wasn’t really sure what materials to use. Then a friend passed me an old jean skirt that no longer fitted her toddler. I used the jeans as the necklace base and strengthened it with felt. I added black lace scraps from the upcycled LBD project, a few Swarovski crystals (a few because they were so expensive!) and a couple of craft gems. The project was finished off with a black ribbon.

    To give the project a sparkle, I sewed on the LilyPad board, light sensor and LED lights. This project glows when it is dim or dark, and flickers when it is bright. You don’t have to do the electronics, but I think I’m hooked ever since doing the blink bike bag! Read below for the tutorial.

    bibNecklace

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 13:00
    FLORAbrella – LED Umbrella with NeoPixels #WearableWednesday



    You’ll be a rainbow in any storm with the FLORAbrella. With its NeoPixel LED strips and color sensor, you’ll be able to match your clothing, or display rainbow and rain patterns. Get ready to have an entourage at the next parade! Follow along with the FLORAbrella guide on the Adafruit Learning System where you’ll find a circuit diagram, sample code, and step-by-step instructions for building your own, written by Leslie Birch!

    Les_florabrella03

    Les_florabrella02


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 12:00
    Stopmotion Oculus Rift Animation #WearableWednesday
  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 11:00
    This Jacket Heated by Arduino #WearableWednesday



    A group of physical computing students in Italy have created a stylish jacket with heat functionality. The zipper activates a heating unit in the collar, while capacitive sensors initiate heaters in the pockets. The jacket uses an Arduino Uno and comes complete with IKEA-like instructions on the inside flap. We actually think the instructions are a nice touch as they transcend any language, making this product ready to go for international sales.

    The group cleverly named their jacket Odisseo, the Italian name for Odysseus.  Just as Odisseo is the hero of the Trojan war, this jacket is the hero of daily life. Considering the latest in temperature swings, this jacket may continue to be a hero in spring. Thinking about heating up your own wearable? You might want to look at our electric heating pad.

    Heating Pad


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 10:00
    The Faint’s new high-tech live tour features Adafruit neopixels! @thefaint #neopixels #wearablewednesday


    NewImage

    The creators project sat down with The Faint to talk about their new tour and they name dropped Adafruit!

    Can you talk about the new show, and the programming you’ve done for it?

    We’re certainly still in the middle of it. I’m using a few programs to create the content. We have lights that are programmed, many via MIDI, and that’s the way we’ve done it for ten years or so.

    We’ve got a strand of video panels straight back and scattered around the stage, and thats what I’m just starting to create content for: the videos, that will show up on the screens. They’re triggered via MIDI at this point, and we’re using a variety of programs to make that all happen.

    There’s this program called Isadora: we’ve been using it since the very first time we did projections back in 2000. The program was recommended to us by a friend, and it worked great, but didn’t have one thing we needed. We got ahold Mark, who writes the program, and he wrote a new section of the actor that we could use so the videos preloaded and would start instantly when they were hit with any note. It’s user-friendly like that; he’s helped us out every time we’ve run into an obstacle. There’s just so much you can do with video, lighting, and MIDI with that program, it’s amazing. Any time I have an idea, I seem to be able to write a program in Isadora that will do it.

    Do you have a programming background?

    Other than The Faint, no (laughs). This is all stuff that I’ve figured it out. The first time we got a Groovebox, I’d never touched anything like it. I started figuring it out, then we started running our show on an MPC. I guess I’m the kind of guy who decides to learn something he doesn’t know anything about. I always enjoy that stressful process—in the end it’s rewarding; I’ve figured something out. Once you start to understand the aspects of one programming language, the others start making more sense. I randomly dove into Isadora, bit by bit.

    One other element of the show is this clear drum set I had made by C&C, and I installed LED lights in them that are all custom programmable through this Arduino board I built. It’s a little micro-controller, so I built a little Arduino controller.

    This is my first Arduino project, using the first board I’ve bought. Basically, Adafruit sells these strips of NeoPixels with sixty LEDs per meter. They’re each individually programmable, and you have to write software in Arduino to get them up and running. I built a little box that powers them, and I can send the data and power through quarter-inch cables. I have quarter-inch jacks built into each of the drums, and so I can trigger the MIDI with drumsticks, or a sensor. As far as what the patterns do, it’s however many looks I program in the software. I’ve got some software writing to fix for sure, because I’m just guessing, and when it doesn’t work, guessing again.

    Do you find any intersections between writing code and writing music?

    They’re very different, but if I’m in the same process of writing a song or jamming out on things, I end up with parts in my head when I go out to eat. You hear little melodies and you think, ‘Oh, I should try that.’ Oddly enough, the same thing happens with writing code. If I’m in that mode, I’ll be out driving around, and my brain starts running functions to turn the turn signal on. You get sucked into both, and in that way it’s similar. But as far as actual thought processes go, it’s pretty different. I wouldn’t relate it other than that your mind gets locked into whatever creative mode when you’re doing it a lot.

    Since 1998, your growth as a band has run parallel to the dawn of all this contemporary technology. The world has changed very drastically since. I’m wondering how you guys have responded to this brave new world, and where you see it going.

    Technology has changed a bunch, which is good for us. Originally, we always had ideas for things that didn’t exist yet. Or, we’d find crappy versions of those ideas, implement them into our set, and by the end of the tour, find out about new programs that would have made things way easier. We’d been running the set on MPCs for years, and at some point I was like okay, if we switch over to a laptop it’s going to be a lot safer to go out and back it up. In a day, you could have your show ready for that night, and try out your software. An MPC is a solid machine, but if something does go wrong, it’s hard to find one that has the right amount of RAM, and all the outputs, plus they’re getting rarer and rarer…

    We had to shift, like, ‘Let’s update into the modern world for our live show so we don’t get stuck too far behind.’ I think in general, we keep up on most things. I don’t feel like I’ve really embraced the social media part of technology, but everything else I feel like I’m in tune with, as far as computers and knowing what’s up are concerned.

    Read more.

    NewImage


    Featured Adafruit Product!

    NewImage

    Adafruit NeoPixel Digital RGB LED Weatherproof Strip 60 LED -1m: You thought it couldn’t get better than our world-famous 32-LED-per-meter Digital LED strip but we will prove you wrong! You wanted twice the LEDs? We got it (well, its 1.875 times as many but that’s within a margin of error). You wanted thinner strips? Now only 12.5 mm wide, 10 mm if you remove the strip from the casing. You wanted less noticable strip color – this strip has white-colored flex PCB, which will be less visible against white-painted walls. This is the strip with white flex PCB, its identical to the black 60 LED/meter except it has a different color mask on the flex strip Read more.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 09:00
    Dog Gets Amazing Technicolor LED Raincoat #WearableWednesday


    Dog Raincoat

    Gladys Delgado-Garced of DogGoneCouture is creating some of the best examples of wearable tech for dogs, and this raincoat is no exception. BlinkyTape LED strips have been inserted into clear vinyl pockets to form little matrices. The BlinkyTape allows you to generate interesting color patterns using easy-to-use software, so she had colors mingling in no time for her dog, Pierre.  Check out the software at work!

    One of the nice things about BlinkyTape is that it is beginner friendly — you don’t need to have a microcontroller or programming skills to get amazing light patterns. That means your dog can look as cute as  little Pierre in no time. You want it, right? Get your BlinkyTape here!

    BlinkyTape


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 08:00
    Neopixel altimeter in action! #WearableWednesday



    We’ve posted about aonsquared‘s neopixel project before but it’s super cool to see it in action!


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 07:00
    LED Bike Helmet Gets Shouts #WearableWednesday


    LED Helmet On

    K-Fai Steele started to get concerned about riding her bike without a helmet as she heard more stories about head injuries. However, the thought of having the typical helmet just seemed like a downer. Luckily she stumbled across our LED Helmet tutorial that fit her fashion needs.

    I feel like when you put a helmet on, you lose the cool factor, but with this helmet, I get a lot of shouts from people when I’m riding.

    K-Fai is no stranger to technology, as she heads up a program with the Philadelphia Library called Maker Jawn — an initiative which is turning teens into makers at local library branches. So, needless to say, she is comfortable with a soldering iron and programming. In fact, the helmet is another example project she can show off and everyone loves LEDs. She feels the helmet, which uses a FLORA microcontroller and a NeoPixel strip,  is still a work in progress.

    I didn’t use the GPS module like in the tutorial, but I did add an accelerometer. I’m interested in finding out whether I can affect the lights with how fast I’m going.

    LED Helmet Guts

    She hasn’t done the coding yet for the accelerometer, but it is in the works. In the meantime, she is famous for being the rainbow bright rider on the streets of Philly. Our thoughts — why leave the LED fun just for the helmet?  Why not get to work on bike bling with our LED Handlebar tutorial. Biking never looked so good, and it is preventative medicine for crashes. So, light up the night.

    leds_LED-handlebars-adafruit-11


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 06:00
    Bionics pioneer Hugh Herr’s prosthetic ankle mimics the power and control of its biological counterpart #WearableWednesday


    NewImage

    MIT News has a great profile on Hugh Herr and his incredible work on bionics.

    These days, Hugh Herr, an associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT, gets about 100 emails daily from people across the world interested in his bionic limbs.

    Messages pour in from amputees seeking prostheses and from media outlets pursuing interviews. Then there are students looking to join Herr’s research group. “The technology inspires young people to get into the field, which is wonderful,” Herr says.

    It’s a mark of the groundbreaking work Herr has done at the MIT Media Lab over the past two decades. An amputee himself, Herr has been designing (and wearing) bionic leg prostheses that, he says, “emulate nature” — mimicking the functions and power of biological knees, ankles, and calves.

    Last month, Herr’s TED talk made headlines, as Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a professional dancer whose leg was partially amputated after the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, used one of his prostheses to rumba on stage.

    Most of these prostheses have reached the world through Herr’s startup, BiOM (originally called iWalk). Since 2010, the company has brought the world’s first bionic foot-and-calf system to more than 900 patients worldwide, including some 400 war veterans.

    “It’s always good to design something people will use. It’s great to do the science, yes, but it’s also great to see humanity using something that one has invented,” Herr says, adding: “Translating technology out of the lab keeps engineers honest.”

    NewImage

    Initially developed by Herr’s research group, BiOM’s prosthesis, dubbed the BiOM T2 System, simulates a biological ankle (and connected calf muscle), delivering a “natural ankle function” during strides.

    Using battery-powered “bionic propulsion,” two microprocessors and six environmental sensors adjust ankle stiffness, power, position, and damping thousands of times per second, at two major positions: First, at heel strike, the system controls the ankle’s stiffness to absorb shock and thrust the tibia forward. Then, algorithms generate fluctuating power, depending on terrain, to propel a wearer up and forward.

    When fitting the prosthesis to patients, prosthetists can program appropriate stiffness and power throughout all the stages of a gait, using software created by Herr’s group — a process the company calls “Personal Bionic Tuning.”

    Among other things, the system restores natural gait, balance, and speed; lowers joint stress; and drastically lowers the time required to acclimate to the prosthesis (which can take weeks or months with conventional models). “Often, within minutes, a patient is walking around, even running around,” says Herr, BiOM’s chief technology officer.

    The system, Herr says, could also help prevent osteoarthritis, a joint condition caused by age and leg strain, by providing calf and ankle power and support even in old age. 


    Read more.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 - 00:00
    Pro Trinket 5V final proto testing!





    From the desk of Ladyada – Pro Trinket 5V final proto testing!

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 23:00
    Make Your Own Battlestar Galactica Sidearm Replica


    bsg gun

    Even though I look at tons of cosplay stuff, I sometimes forget that anything can be fashioned from PVC foam (Sintra is one option). Instructables user Goombah Squad used the material to make some cool Battlestar Galactica guns to go with his costume. After he purchased blueprints from another builder, he used the foam to piece together the gun. After that it was all abut the shaping. Here’s the steps he took to get the gun just right:

    I use a Dremel with a sanding bit for 80% of the work. The remaining 20% is a variety of needle files, various grits of sandpaper, or the occasional grinding and engraving bit. I started by shaping and gluing the main frame of the gun. Once everything was how it needed to be, other pieces were added: grips, various rails along the side of the barrel. The two halves of the slide action were each crafted separately. So was the grenade launcher attachment.

    Once everything’s shaped, break out your Bondo. Bondo is an automotive filler typically used to fill in car dents and dings but as you’ll find, it’s widely used in propmaking. Anywhere you see unsightly seems or low areas, mix up some Bondo. Wait about 20 mins for it to cure when it becomes unworkable.

    gun pattern

    Read more at Instructables.

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 21:39
    Adafruit and Solve for X Present: Moonshot Meet Up with Ayah Bdeir from littleBits on Google+ Friday, April 25 at 11 am PT/2 pm ET



    Adafruit and Solve for X Present: Moonshot Meet Up with Ayah Bdeir from littleBits on Google+ Friday, April 25 at 11 am PT/2 pm ET.

    +Solve For X is a place to hear about and discuss radical technology ideas for solving global problems. Created by Google, +Solve for X embraces moonshot pioneers with a Huge Problem to solve, a Radical Solution for solving it, and Breakthrough Technology to make it happen. The ‘Moonshot Meet Up’ Hangout on Air series was created by +Solve for X to connect community members with engaging, hands-on discussions with Moonshot Pioneers and to further the discussion of technology moonshots.

    Limor “Ladyada” Fried from Adafruit will be interviewing Ayah Bdeir from littleBits and Catherine Wong.

    Ayah Bdeir is the founder and CEO of littleBits, an award-winning library of Electronics dubbed “LEGOs for the iPad generation.” Bdeir is an engineer, interactive artist and one of the leaders of the open hardware movement. Bdeir’s career and education have centered on advancing open source hardware to make education and innovation more accessible to people around the world. She is a co-founder of the Open Hardware Summit, a TED Senior Fellow and an alumna of the MIT Media Lab. Bdeir was named one of Fast Company’s 1000 Most Creative People in Business and one of Popular Mechanics’ 25 Makers Who Are Reinventing the American Dream. littleBits was named as one of CNN’s top 10 Emerging Startups to watch. In two short years, littleBits has garnered praise as the most extensive, versatile and easy to use hardware platform out there and partnered with leading science, art and technology organizations such as MoMA and KORG. Originally from Lebanon and Canada, Ayah now lives in New York City.

    littleBits is an opensource library of electronic modules that snap together with tiny magnets for prototyping, learning, and fun.

    littleBits (spelled lower case L, upper case B, all one word) consists of tiny circuit-boards with specific functions engineered to snap together with magnets. No soldering, no wiring, no programming, just snap together for prototyping, learning and fun. Each bit has a specific function (light, sound, sensors, buttons, thresholds, pulse, motors, etc), and modules snap to make larger circuits. Just as LEGO™ allows you to create complex structures with very little engineering knowledge, littleBits are small, simple, intuitive, blocks that make creating with sophisticated electronics a matter of snapping small magnets together.

    With a growing number of available modules, littleBits aims to move electronics from late stages of the design process to its earliest ones, and from the hands of experts, to those of artists, makers, students and designers.

    Catherine Wong is a previous Google Science Fair Finalist and she is working on building hackerspaces for schools Specifically, aiming to bring hackerspaces – filled with relatively inexpensive but awesome equipment ranging from 3D printers to soldering stations, as well as stations for CS and engineering classes – to the high schools or communities of students in disadvantaged neighborhoods; our mission is to reignite the excitement of learning in students who might otherwise be struggling by giving them access to the tools to build and make.

    Limor “Ladyada” is a MIT engineer, open source hardware and software pioneer and entrepreneur. She is the founder of the educational electronics company, Adafruit. Her goal was to create the best place online for learning electronics and making the best designed products for makers of all ages and skill levels. Limor was the first female engineer on the cover of WIRED magazine, an EFF Pioneer Award recipient for open-source software & hardware and was recently awarded Entrepreneur magazine’s Entrepreneur of the year.

    See you there!

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 21:00
    3D Paper Artwork by Maud Vantours #ArtTuesday


    Pasted Image 4 21 14 11 20 PM

    3D Paper Artwork by Maud Vantours:

    Maud Vantours was born in 1985 in France. Designer and artist, she lives and works in Paris. A graduate from the parisian school Duperré, Maud follows a Design training with a specialisation in textiles and materials research.

     

    Color, material and patterns have an important place in her work, like paper, which became her favorite material. She sculpts it in 3D layer after layer, by superimposing paper and colors to create inspired patterns in volume.

     

    Maud’s work transcending a simple material and transforming it into a work of art. Her design creations are original graphics of multicolored and dreamlike landscapes….

    Read More.

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    Pasted Image 4 21 14 11 24 PM

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 20:52
    Earth Day 3d Printing Project #3dprinting


    Happy Earth Day! Help raise neighborhood recycling rates with this cool 3d printing project:

    3D printed recycle bins for bottles and cans

    3D printed recycle bins for bottles and cans. They connect together with a modular design which allows you to use them in sets or one at a time. This project connects two communities: the locals and the makers. Urban Hubs act as exchange points for local residents to drop off empty bottles and cans so that neighbors can collect them and redeem them for cash.

    You can download the files from UrbanHubs

    connect together design

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 20:37
    Knit Glitch throw rug


    Adafruit 2955

    Knit Glitch throw rug @ Fairgoods.

    Phillip Stearns’ glitch textiles are the result of “transcoding glitches in the cold, hard logic of digital circuits into soft, warm textiles. I wanted to find ways to give digital and computer-generated images life beyond the screen.” The design for this cotton throw was created by manually short circuiting a low-resolution digital camera, then made using computerized weaving and knitting machinery.

    Learn more.

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 20:00
    A Collection of Comic Maps #arttuesday


    IsabelGreenberg

    Last week, Hyperallergic highlighted the great work being done on the blog Comic Cartography, which has an extensive catalogue of graphics and maps taken from comics. Hyperallergic’s Jillian Steinhauer writes about the importance of these maps in the fictional world building of the comic book genre:

    Comics are an especially apt medium for this type of construction, since, well, they’re visual. Diagrams and maps in comics can do different kinds of work: they can be used as exposition, to help readers get their bearings in a story, or to create a mood or feeling, or simply as a prop. They’re not even necessarily made-up — Jason Lutes’s Berlin is a series of fictional stories set in a historical place.

    Comic Cartography, a lovely blog that I discovered today, collects images of maps from all different kinds of comics, from Lutes’s Weimar-Era Berlin to the office layout of the Daily Bugle, the fictional newspaper featured in the Spider-Man comics. The wide range of work makes the blog engrossing, as it highlights the many forms and shapes that maps can take but also their underlying commonality: we use them to make sense of the world, even if that world exists only in our heads. To that end, there’s also something wonderfully meta about seeing these images within images — they seem to simultaneously represent a homing in and a zooming out.

    DarwynCooke

    Read more.

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 19:30
    #Z4 + #BeagleBoneBlack + #Arduino + #Neopixels = Shift Lights! #beagleboneblack @TXInstruments @beagleboardorg



    Cool project from Twitter user Owen McAree!


    BeagleBone Adafruit Industries Unique fun DIY electronics and kits

    Each Tuesday is BeagleBone Black Day here at Adafruit! What is the BeagleBone? The BeagleBones are a line of affordable single-board Linux computers (SBCs) created by Texas Instruments. New to the Bone? Grab one of our Adafruit BeagleBone Black Starter Packs and check out our extensive resources available on the Adafruit Learning System including a guide to setting up the Adafruit BeagleBone IO Python Library. We have a number of Bone accessories including add-on shields (called “capes”) and USB devices to help you do even more with your SBC. Need a nice display to go along with your Bone? Check out our fine selection of HDMI displays, we’ve tested all of them with the Beagle Bone Black!

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 19:00
    Paper Dreams: How one maker’s paper model building hobby landed him a job with a formula one racing team #ArtTuesday



    Check out this inspirational mini documentary that Siemens posted on their YouTube channel- just goes to show that sharing your projects with the world can lead to great things! We encourage all makers out there to keep building and sharing with the community – you never know where it could land you.

    Paul used to build race cars out of paper. Today, he designs the real thing with sophisticated software, as part of the Infiniti Red Bull Racing team.

    Read more.

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 18:32
    Happy Earth Day 2014! Here’s some giant images of the Earth via NASA #earthday2014


    NewImage

    Today is Earth Day! Every year we celebrate by posting some of our favorite images of the earth. These are from the NASA catalog called visible earth. You can view more images here. Here’s a little background on the history of earth day:

    Earth Day is an annual event, celebrated on April 22, on which events are held worldwide to demonstrate support for environmental protection. It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network, and celebrated in more than 192 countries each year.

    In 1969 at a UNESCO Conference in San Francisco, peace activist John McConnell proposed a day to honor the Earth and the concept of peace, to first be celebrated on March 21, 1970, the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere. This day of nature’s equipoise was later sanctioned in a Proclamation written by McConnell and signed by Secretary General U Thant at the United Nations. A month later a separate Earth Day was founded by United States Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in first held on April 22, 1970. Nelson was later awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award in recognition of his work. While this April 22 Earth Day was focused on the United States, an organization launched by Denis Hayes, who was the original national coordinator in 1970, took it international in 1990 and organized events in 141 nations. Numerous communities celebrate Earth Week, an entire week of activities focused on environmental issues.

    Read more.

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    NewImage

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