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  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 17:00
    Inside a Secret Apple Room Where iPhone Software Was Born


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    Inside a Secret Apple Room Where iPhone Software Was Born – Digits – WSJ.

    The secret meeting room where most of the design decisions for the original iPhone’s software were made is “hallowed ground” to Greg Christie, who designs the software interface for Apple products and one of the first members recruited to work on the device in 2004.

    Check out the tester!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 17:00
    3D Printer Assembly Workshop, April 12-13th @ DM+D in Philadelphia #3DThursday #3DPrinting #reprap


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    A few spots left to sign up to build a 3D printer with master bot builder John Abella — 3D Printer Village community leader and long time Adafruit customer (since 2007!). He is reprising the affordable 3D printer group build + class he and his dad offered last October, this time at Philadelphia’s Department of Making + Doing this weekend. As of last night there was still a spot or two left, so hurry if you are interested!

    This two-day workshop helps class attendees build their own RepRap 3D printer from scratch, from general assembly and wiring, through tuning and printing. Included in the $999 workshop fee: all parts required to build the printer, a set of allen wrenches to work on the printer later, USB and power cords, and a set of sample plastics to get started printing. Food is provided each day.

    ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR – John Abella has written for Make magazine, runs the World Maker Faire 3D Printer Village, and is on the Board of Directors for Barrel of Makers, Delaware’s first makerspace. He currently has six 3D printers at home.

    Read More.

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    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 16:00
    3D Printer World Records Attempts: Aleph Objects and LeTourneau University #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    In a friendly competitive spirit, we are seeing companies and colleges starting to compete for various Guinness Book of World Records’s categories for “most simultaneously running 3D printers.” Check out the impressive video above from Aleph Objects with their LULZBOT TAZ printers counting off as well as a photo of the students at LeTourneau University in Longview, Texas below who have already filed their World Record claim.

    These competitions are fun if anything for the way they are indicating the new “herding” and “farming” behaviors around desktop 3D printing that would be too costly for a similar quantity of industrial machines.

    From Aleph Objects:

    At Aleph Objects, Inc, we believe we hold the world record for most 3D printers running simultaneously. On April 3rd, 2014 we recorded 109 LulzBot 3D printers running simultaneously. If you know anyone who has done more, let us know!

    We will be contacting the Guinness World Records to submit our claim for the record.

    Read More.

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  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 15:01
    Interview with Gael Langevin, Inventor of the Open Source Lifesize 3D Printed InMoov Robot #3DxRobotics #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Interview with Gael Langevin from the InMoov Robot from Wevolver on Vimeo.

    Wevolver shared this great interview with
    Gael Langevin, Inventor Behind the Open Source Lifesize 3D Printed InMoov Robot. Via 3Ders.org.

    Since October 2012, Gael Langevin has been building the InMoov robot step-by-step. Starting with an Arduino-controlled hand and forearm, the robot slowly came to life. The InMoov robot’s “skin,” joints, gears and many other pieces have been 3D printed.

    Since 2012 people all over the globe have been printing and building the Inmoov robot. Right now parts of the InMoov are even being “hacked”to use as prosthetics. Truly amazing.

    Wevolver invited Gael to come to the 2014 Arduino Day in Amsterdam to show and tell about his InMoov robot, since we are huge fans!

    Read More.

    InMoov

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    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 15:00
    Alien Chestburster Costume


    alien chestburster

    If you’re not up for creating a full on Xenomorph costume, go smaller and make a Chestburster. Instructables user Fiery She-Beast made one from wood, foil, and clay. On top of that you’ll need an old t-shirt you’re okay with ruining and fake blood and a few other essentials. She’s how she made the little baby alien:

    Stuff the pipe with tin foil, creating a lump on top of the pipe, this forms the alien’s head shape. Squash a few lumps of clay onto to pipe, and begin to sculpt the alien. It has a large forehead with no eyes, make the facial area smooth. The mouth has no apparent lips, but it has lots of sharp teeth, so be sure in include those. The temples in jaw consist of random lines and patterns with one main line running from the bottom of the jaw and curving upward on both sides. The tail is wrapped around the alien at the base of where is busted out. I found it fun to make a few intestines and flesh lumps around it from where it came out.

    Read more at Instructables.

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 14:00
    Artist Ion Popian’s Mental Fabrications Project Transforms Brainwaves into Physical Forms #3DxArt #3DThursday #3DPrinting


    Mentalfabrications LANDSCAPES

    Artist Ion Popian’s Mental Fabrications Project Transforms Brainwaves into Physical Forms:

    ION POPIAN – Mental Fabrications Exhibit Brief

    Technology has long since adapted our bodies to the world. Voyager-Challenger Deep-impact suits, these have all extended our purview higher, deeper, and guarded us against the destructive forces we bring upon ourselves. Mental Fabrications proposes a technological intervention focused on our own depths in order to extend our mental not physical facilities. It proposes a human-machine relationship, a pairing that isolates our unconscious from our entirely too human subjective filter. Where a pencil extends our intellectual world through the stylized articulations of our hands, this project explores the potential for architecture and urbanism to develop by giving our unconscious lives an unmediated chance to be formative in the design process. Before we are human we are something else. Base pairs making up our DNA strands combine according to non-human attraction infinitely reorienting in relation to one another to create diversity. A computer code modeled after these processes can exceed its computational potential becoming generative in its own right. Creating a forum where this peculiar human-nonhuman relationship can flourish opens the way to design that is responsive, living, and can contribute to the world it inhabits.

    Read More.

    Mentalfabrications LANDSCAPES

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 13:00
    Multi-materials, Noise-canceling 3D-printed Chaise Longue by Neri Oxman #3DxArchitecture #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Multi-materials, Noise-canceling 3D-printed chaise longue by Neri Oxman. From Dezeen:

    This chaise longue by architect, designer and MIT professor Neri Oxman features 44 different composite materials 3D-printed inside a wooden enclosure, creating a multi-coloured recliner.

    …Each of the materials has a different rigidity and colour, and is arranged to cushion the user. The choice of shapes is also informed by their noise-cancelling properties.

    “The chaise is designed to use curved surfaces that tend to reflect the sound inwards,” said Oxman. “The surface structure scatters the sound and reflects it into the 3D-printed skin that absorbs that sound, and creates a quiet and calm environment.”

    The outer layer is made from a solid wood shell milled using a CNC machine by New York company SITU Fabrication. It follows the contours of the body, with a deep seat, back rest, and a curving head piece that immerses the user and helps block out sound.

    Gemini Alpha was designed in collaboration with W. Craig Carter, professor at MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

    It is currently on display at Le Laboratoire art and design centre in Paris and the second piece, Gemini Beta, will be unveiled in September.

    Read More.

    NeriOxmanAcousticLounge

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    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 12:00
    3D Materials Inspiration – Fish3d: A New Touch-sensitive, Interactive Modeling Environment #3DThursday


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    3D Materials Inspiration – Fish3d: A New Touch-sensitive, Interactive Modeling Environment. From SolidSmack.com:

    If you’ve been fishing, you know the layer of slime that covers the fish, protecting it from your nasty hand bacteria. It’s also a defense mechanism that helps protect the fish from predators and, as it turns out, is much more than what it seems. Particularly in the case of the Hagfish. Researches at MIT’s Media Ecology Lab have discovered a new way to interact with our Hagfish friends via the slime they produce while at the same time developing parametric surface geometry, a development that could very well push product design into your surrounding and away from the desktop.

    A small amount of slime is first scraped from the body of an anesthetized Hagfish. Added to distilled water, the tightly bundled cells unravel, immediately binding the threads together to form large amounts of viscous material. This material is highly formable where the addition of electric current manipulates the substance to form on, around, or against items, even to the level of separate ‘parts’ being created, color added or opaqueness adjusted through simple touch/gestural interaction. The slime threads are the key. Dr. Fudge (real name) of the Comparative Biomaterials Lab states:

    The slime is composed of fine protein slime threads as well as a mucus component that comes packaged in tiny vesicles. When these components are ejected from the slime glands, they combine synergistically to form a slime mass in which a large volume of water is entrained. Recent work by Julia Herr has investigated the chemical composition of the slime and the mechanisms of mucin vesicle stabilization a deployment. Tim Winegard recently published a paper on the mechanisms of thread skin deployment, which involves the unravelling of 15 cm long threads from subcellular structures…

    These “slime threads” are similar to spider silk in their dimensions, but they differ in a couple of important ways that make them excellent candidates for such a biomimetic project. Slime threads are built within cells from intermediate filament proteins via a process of hierarchical self-assembly. This is quite different from the dynamic spinning process that transforms liquid crystalline spider silk proteins in the silk gland into an insoluble fibre.

    These slime threads have even more potential for an interactive 3d modeling experience when they are still attached to the creature. Apparently, the Hagfish itself can be used as somewhat of an input device, directing viscosity of the materials, attach points and even patterned geometry….

    Read More.

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  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 11:00
    EU Iniative to 3D Print Food for the Elderly by 2015 #3DxKitchen #3DThursday #3DPrinting


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    EU Iniative to 3D Print Food for the Elderly by 2015. From Horizon:

    Researchers are working to revolutionise mealtimes for elderly people with swallowing problems – by 3D-printing their food.

    The 3D printer will be able to create easily digestible food, which not only maintains the shape and taste of the real thing, but can also be fortified with specific nutrients.

    Studies suggest that more than one in five people over the age of 50 have problems swallowing their food – a condition known as dysphagia. Those with this problem have difficulties eating because the larynx fails to close properly during swallowing, so that food ends up in the lungs instead of the stomach.

    …Kück expects that elderly residents will be able to choose from different menus each week and the meals will be prepared in a processing plant before delivery. It is hoped that the new technology will also mean that food can be personalised, adding specific vitamins or nutrients – for example folic acid – as required by residents.

    …The 3D printer will work in the same way as a conventional inkjet device – except the cartridges are filled with liquefied food, instead of ink.

    ‘If you have people who don’t want vegetables, you might fortify the meat with certain vitamins – there really are no restrictions in terms of what food can be recreated.’

    Read More.

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    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 10:00
    3D Design (Counter) Inspiration: 15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects #3DThursday


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    3D Design (Counter) Inspiration: 15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects, via WIRED:

    How can an object be incredibly, exquisitely, perfectly designed–and a colossal pain in the ass to use?

    That’s precisely what Katerina Kamprani shows us with “The Uncomfortable,” a collection of familiar household objects rendered aggravatingly unusable with a few simple adjustments. The ranks include open-toed rain boots, a pitcher that pours back into itself, and a button as thick as thumb.

    Kamprani, a designer and architect in Athens, creates the objects with 3D rendering software. Her first stubborn creation was a closet with doors that opened inward.

    The conceit is clever enough on its own, but Kamprani’s poetic execution is what makes the project so great. Each object stays largely faithful to the materials and forms of the original; typically there’s just one deft change that sends its utility flying out the window.

    Kamprani starts by recreating the steps it takes to use an object, isolating a single interaction to sabotage. She consults with friends and draws sketches, auditioning a variety of tweaks and transformations until she’s found just the right one. “I know an idea is good when it is so ridiculous I even surprise myself,” she says….

    Read more.

    An imperfect cookie

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    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 09:00
    Ultimaker Pitches in 3D Printers to Help Zuyd University Compete in Shell Eco-marathon with 3D Printed Car (VIDEO) #3DThursday #3DPrinting



    Ultimaker Pitches in 3D Printers to Help Zuyd University Compete in Shell Eco-marathon with 3D Printed Car:

    Geldermalsen, the Netherlands, 9 April 2014 – Zuyd University of Applied Sciences is participating in the 2014 Shell Eco-marathon with a car for which 3D printing technology has been used in the production process. The Shell Eco-marathon is an annual competition that aims to challenge student teams to develop, build and test ultra-efficient cars.

    Zuyd University is participating for the fifth time, but it is the first time that 3D printing technology is being used during the production process. A desktop 3D printer makes car parts like the dashboard, steering wheel, mirrors and handles. On top of that, 220 molds are printed to make the carbon fibre parts for the body of the car.

    Ultimaker supports the Zuyd University team with ten Ultimaker Original 3D printers to make the printing as fast and efficient as possible.

    “The main goal is to make a car that is as sustainable as possible, and the energy consumption must be as low as possible,“ says Professor Rob van Loevezijn of Zuyd University’s Faculty of Beta Sciences and Technology. 3D printing has been chosen because this technology is budget and environmentally friendly. The PLA plastics used in the 3D printer are environmentally friendly and biodegradable. Making the molds with a 3D printer is also a lot faster than making the traditional wooden molds….

    Read More.


    649-1

    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 08:00
    Hot Wax Pen EggBot Accessory – Electro-Kistka from Evil Mad Scientist #3DThursday #eggbot


    Electro Kistka

    Hot Wax Pen EggBot Accessory – Electro-Kistka from Evil Mad Scientist:

    The Electro-Kistka for EggBot is a compact kistka — a hot wax dispensing pen — designed to work with the EggBot. With it, you can use the traditional wax-resist and dye (batik) method to produce stunning colorful eggs in the same fashion as Ukranian pysanky eggs.

    In the example shown here, we first “paint” the wax logo on a bare (white) egg, and then dye the egg red and allow it to dry. We then paint additional wax onto the egg (the words “Electro-Kistka”), and finally dye the egg black and allow it to dry again. Then, after melting away the surface wax, we reveal the design: a black background, with red and white areas.

    Repeated application with care can produce more detailed designs, with additional color layers.

    (These intense red and black colors are from our batik egg dyes.)

    This kit contains the complete Electro-Kistka attachment for EggBot and basic accessories that you need to get started. It comes assembled, tested, and ready to install on your EggBot. It is compatible with both The Original Eggbot (white chassis) and Ostrich Eggbot.

    Read more.

    Egg bot electro kistka

    Egg Bot Beauty

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 07:00
    Handheld 3D Scanning with the Sense Comes to the Mac #3DThursday #3DPrinting #3DScanning


    Sense Scanner

    Handheld 3D Scanning with the Sense Comes to the Mac:

    All Mac users can now enjoy the Sense at home 3D Scanner as much as the PC user has been doing for a few months now. Released in late 2013, the Sense 3D scanner is Fully integrated with Cubify.com and the Cube 3D printer, the Sense allows scans to upload directly for 3D printing, either at home or through the cloud. It releases STL files and PLY files.

    …The Sense is the first 3D scanner designed for easy consumer use and optimized for 3D printing. …The Sense software V1.1 features Mac support and other feature upgrades including improved scan tracking and stability, upgraded auto-enhancement for correct brightness and color.

    These features build on the very easy-to-use interface that allows anyone to focus, crop, delete and share color 3D data. Sense printables can be sent to Cube® and CubeX™ 3D printers, or directly uploaded to Cubify.com for cloud printing in a range of materials, including Ceramix, Aluminix and Clear….

    Read More.

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    Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

    Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

    The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 02:00
    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show!





    ASK AN ENGINEER – LIVE electronics video show! (video).

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:30
    SHOW-AND-TELL Google+ LIVE Hangout! (video)
  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 00:26
    NEW PRODUCT – 74AHC125 – Quad Level-Shifter (3V / 5V)


    1787 00 SM

    NEW PRODUCT – 74AHC125 – Quad Level-Shifter (3V / 5V): Level shifting chips let you connect 3V and 5V devices together safely. This chip is similar to others in the shop (such as the 74LVC125) except this one is particularly good at converting 3V logic up to 5V. This is in demand especially when connecting some 3V devices such as the Teensy 3 to NeoPixels! Just power the 74AHC125 with 5V, it will detect 3V logic properly. You can also use it to connect 5V logic out to 3V logic in, that’s when you want to power the 74AHC125 with 3V, it can safely read 5V logic on the input pins.

    To use, apply 3-5V power to the VCC pin, common ground to the ground pin, and tie the /OE (output enable) pins to ground. Data goes in on the A pins and goes out on the matching Y pins. Check the datasheet for the pinouts!

    In stock and shipping now!

    1787 01 SM

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 00:00
    Imogen Heap’s Music-Controlling Gloves #WearableWednesday



    Cool performance by Imogen Heap, Q&A on the glove controller below:

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 23:00
    Responsive Bike Jacket #WearableWednesday



    Parsons design & technology student Nour Chamoun writes in about her responsive bike jacket:

    The bike jacket is composed of 3 features:

    1- 2 tilt sensors on each arm to sense the right or left motioning of arms, flashing lights indicating right or left.

    2- An accelerometer to sense the deceleration of the cyclist, flashing a red warning light on the back of the jacket.

    3- An infrared sensor to the left side of the cyclist to sense if any vehicles or other cyclists are getting too close and sets off a small vibrating motor to warn the cyclist.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 23:00
    Gundam Cosplay Tutorial


    unicorn gundam costume

    Taking on the task of building a mech or a Gundam is not simple. You’re committing to spending a lot of time and depending on the materials used, a fair amount of cash. If you’re interested though, RPF user Clivelee has put together an informative tutorial (it even has a table of contents) to walk you through the process. He created the Unicorn Gundam pictured above, so he knows his stuff. He goes over planning, materials, where to find the right tools, and each part of the body. Here’s a sample:

    gundam_mecha_cosplay_costume_tutorial___lesson_1_1_by_miragecld-d5evr29

    You can see the entire tutorial at The RPF.

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 22:00
    Pixeldelic Vest #WearableWednesday


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    Joshua Herbert made this vest with 324 LEDs! Brookleynn Morris caught up with him at the Exploratorium wearables event last week and writes in:

    Joshua Herbert’s Pixeldelic leather vests are covered in 324 LEDs that can be programmed to play any pattern or image. Anything seen on a computer screen, including videos right off of YouTube, live video and hand drawn patterns can be shown on the vest.


    Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

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